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Full text of "New York Hospital School of Nursing Announcement"

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New York Hospital, 



WEST FIFTEENTH STREET. 



RULES FOR NURSES, 



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NEW YORK : 

Albert B. King & Co., Printers, 105 William Street 

189G. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/newyorkhospitals18961940newy 



PATIENTS. 

i. No patient shall leave the house, unless by permission of 
the Superintendent, nor gamble within the Hospital, nor intro- 
duce any liquors into the house. 

2. No patient shall enter the dead-house, engine-rooms, 
kitchen, laundry, or any of the nurses' or servants' apartments, 
under any pretense whatever. 

3. No male patient shall go into the women's apartments or 
Wards, nor any female patient into those of the men. 

4. No patient shall be allowed to have any book, pamphlet, 
newspaper, print or picture of an immoral or indecent char- 
acter. 

5. If any patient shall not conform to the foregoing regula- 
tions, or shall use profane or indecent language, or get drunk, 
or behave rudely or indecently, the Superintendent may imme- 
diately discharge him, if he deems it necessary, and shall report 
the case to the Visiting Committee at their next meeting. 

6. No officer or servant of this Institution shall accept any 
gift or bequest from or in behalf of any patient, except with the 
approbation of the Visiting Committee. 

7. Patients must be treated kindly and firmly, and may 
neither direct a nurse nor give orders in any way. 

8. Care must be taken that patients are served with their 
meals, or other food, promptly. Empty dishes and pitchers 
must be returned to the kitchen without delay. 

9. Patients must have a full bath each week, unless other- 
wise ordered, but never sooner than two hours after a full meal. 

10. No patient will be permitted to leave the Ward till after 
the morning rounds of the House Staff, nor at any other time 
without permission from the Nurse in charge of the Ward. 

n. Patients may not receive visits from friends in the 
Solarium, nor may their friends visit through the Hospital 
without permission from the Office. 









4 NURSES. 

NURSES. 

i. The hours of duty for Nurses by day shall be from 7 
o'clock a. m. to 7 p. m. ; and by night from 7 o'clock p. m. to 

7 A. M. 

2. Each Nurse must be in her Ward promptly at 7 o'clock 
in the morning. She must be neatly dressed, with her hair 
smoothly arranged. Her clothing and person must be kept 
scrupulously clean. 

3. The Assistant Nurses and Orderlies must regard them- 
selves as subordinate to the Head Nurse of the Ward and obey 
her orders. No commands shall be received from patients. 

4. Nurses must observe proper decorum and civility toward 
patients, Orderlies, and each other. 

5. Nurses on the entrance of an Officer or stranger into the 
Ward shall at once rise, if seated, and give all visitors prompt 
attention. No strangers should be admitted to the Wards, with- 
out passes. The ordinary length of a visit is half an hour. This 
limit should not be exceeded except in special cases, in the dis- 
cretion of the Nurse. All passes to Wards expire at 7 p. m., 
unless a later hour is distinctly stated in writing. 

6. The Nurses will take their meals in the Nurses' Dining 
Room. They will be served as follows : Coffee and Rolls, 
6.20 a. m.; Breakfast, 8 to 9.15 a. m.; Dinner, 1 to 2.15 p.m.; 
Supper, 6 to 7.15 p. m. They will use the stairs in going to 
the dining-room and the large elevator in returning. 

7. Meals must be punctually attended by the Nurses in turn ; 
one Nurse always remaining in the Ward or within call. 

8. No food, drink or fruit sent in for any patient by friends 
or other persons outside, shall be given to the patient except on 
the approval of the House Physician or Surgeon. 

9. The appropriation by any employe of any article of food 
or drink prescribed for a patient will be deemed an offense 
justifying the dismissal of the person so offending. 

10. It shall be the duty of the Head Nurse to report 



NURS1 5. 



promptly to the Superintendent's office everything in the Ward 
requiring attention, and especially the failure of the supply o* 
ice and milk, and any misbehavior or insubordination of patients 
or persons employed. The omission to do this will be con- 
sidered a serious offense. 

n. After the morning or afternoon prescriptions have been 
completed, the Head Nurse of the Ward shall call the elevator 
and send them down to the Apothecary, together with the 
empty bottles. The Apothecary shall promptly fill the pre- 
scriptions and send the articles and medicines by the elevator to 
the Ward. Any failure to supply medicines or surgical appa- 
ratus must be immediately reported to the Superintendent's 
office. 

12. All medicines, dressings, etc., must be kept in the medi- 
cine closet provided for that purpose, and the closet kept always 
locked. Surgical appliances, not in use, should be sent to Splint 
Room. 

13. Any unfavorable condition taking place in a patient 
must be promptly reported to the House Physician or Surgeon, 
or in his absence to the Senior Assistant. 

14. The affairs and condition of all patients are to be con- 
sidered as strictly private. 

15. The Nurse in charge will be held responsible for the 
whereabouts of the patients of the Ward. 

16. Nurses must refuse to receive patients into their Wards 
without cards, excepting emergency cases, during the night. 
When such cases are thus received the absence of cards should 
be promptly reported to the office in the morning. 

17. When a patient is to be discharged, the House Physician 
or Surgeon will sign his Hospital card. The Nurse will see that 
the patient is properly dressed, and takes away all his effects ; 
and shall accompany such patient to the Superintendent's office, 
and there deposit his card. 

18. In the event of the death of a patient, the date and hour 
of death should be noted on the Hospital card, and the card 
without delay deposited in the Superintendent's office. 



O NURSES. 

19. An accurate account must be kept of the condition and 
stock of the linen of the Ward. 

20. All waste material must be put in the waste pail at once, 
and all soiled clothes or other material for the laundry in the 
clothes basket. At five minutes before 9 a. m. the pail and 
clothes bag must be placed at the door of the small elevator. At 
9 a. m. the elevator will collect them. The clothes will be 
taken to the laundry and the pails to the engine-room, and the 
bags and pails promptly returned. 

21. Each Head Nurse will be held responsible for the good 
condition of her Ward, including the dining-room, closets and 
lavatory attached, and for the clean and serviceable condition of 
all utensils. 

22. No attempts to regulate excessive heat or cold should be 
made in the Wards. Such excess should be at once reported to 
the Office, where it will receive prompt attention. When the 
sun is too bright or warm, the blinds on the Fifteenth Street 
side must be closed. 

23. Beds and bedding must be aired carefully, some each 
day, that all may be fresh at least once a week. 

24. When a patient leaves the Hospital, his bed must be aired 
thoroughly. 

25. Every direction of the Medical Officers must be care- 
fully noted and obeyed, and medicines must be administered 
faithfully at the time and in the quantity prescribed. 

26. At the discretion of the Directress, Nurses will be 
allowed leave of absence one afternoon in each week; and they 
shall also, if the pressure of their duties and the condition of the 
weather permit, spend an hour every day in the open air. They 
will also be excused from duty a part of each Sunday. They 
must not be out after 10 p. m. without permission from the 
Directress. And they shall have a vacation of two weeks in 
each year, the time of which shall be determined by the 
Directress according to the exigencies of the Hospital Service 
with just regard to their wishes and convenience. 

27. Nurses and Orderlies are not to visit other W T ards or 



N l R 7 

talk with other Nurses and Orderlies when on duty, except in 
performance thereof, nor to visit any Wards when off duty. 

28. The Night Nurses will be in their rooms between the 
hours of 9 a. m. and 4 p. M., unless permission to the contrary 
is granted by the Directress. They must not remain in the 
Wards during their leisure hours. 

29. Male patients must, upon admission, invariably have a 
bath in the Reception Ward, unless the contrary is distinctly 
ordered by the House Physician or Surgeon. 

30. Upon admission to the Wards, patients should invariably 
be informed by the Nurse in charge that valuables can be kept 
in the Wards Only at the risk of the owners. All valuables 
should be kept in the safe in the Office. The Hospital refuses 
to assume any responsibility for losses which may occur. 

31. In no case should any property of patients (including 
clothing) be delivered to any one other than the owner without 
an order from the Office. 

32. A careful record should be kept of patients' clothing, 
and diligence exercised to secure the return of all articles sent 
to the Laundry or Disinfecting Tank. If such articles are not 
returned in due season, a prompt investigation should be made. 

^^. Patients' clothing may be sent once to the laundry if 
necessary, but not more than once, without the Superintendent's 
permission. 

34. On the death of a patient all property (including cloth- 
ing) should be delivered to the Office. Before the body is sent 
to the Dead-House it should be carefully inspected and all 
jewelry and other valuables removed. 

35. The doors leading from the Wards to the Lavatory 
passages must never be left open. 

36. No liquor shall be brought into the House without the 
knowledge and consent of the Superintendent. 

37. Loud talking across Wards or Halls, or unnecessary 
noise of anv kind, is forbidden. 









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''Nursing is an Art : and if it is to be made an art, 
requires as exclusive a devotion, as hard a preparation as 
any painter's or sculptor's work ; for what is the having 
to do with dead canvas or cold marble, compared with 
having to do with the living body — the temple of God's 
Spirit. ... It is one of the Fine Arts ; T had almost 
said the finest of the Fine Arts." 

FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE. 







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APPROACH TO THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL IN 1851 



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THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 

6-16 West Sixteenth Street and 7-23 West Fifteenth Street, 
New York Citv 



BLOOMINGDALE HOSPITAL 

FOR MENTAL DISEASES 

White Plains. New York 



CAMPBELL COTTAGES 

FOR CONVALESCENT CHILDREN 

White Plains, New York 



GOVERNORS 

President 

EDWARD W. SHELDON" 

Vice-President 

PAYNE WHITNEY 

Treasurer 

PAUL TUCKERMAN 

Hermann H. Cammann Henry G. Barber 

Henry W. de Forest Cornelius N. Bliss. Jr. 

Richard Trimble William Woodward 

Howard Townsend Arthur Iselin 

George F. Baker G. Beekman Hoppin 

Augustine J. Smith Lewis Cass Ledyard, Jr. 

Charles S. Brown Henry R. Taylor 

Bronson Winthrop R. Horace Gallatin 

Frank K. Sturgis Walter Jennings 

David B. Ogden Joseph H. Choate. Jr. 

Other Officers of the Corporation 

Henry W. Crane. Secretary 

G. Howard Wise, Asst. Secretary 

United States Trust Co.. Asst. Treasurer 

Superintendent of the Hospital 

Thomas Howell. M. D. 

Directress of the Training School 
Minnie H. Jordan. R. N. 



Medical Officers 

Lewis A. Conner, M. D., President Medical Board 
Edward Cussler, M. D., Secretary Medical Board 

Consulting Staff 

PHYSICIANS 

Charles E. Hackley, M.D. L. Duncan Buckley, M. D. 

Edward L. Partridge, M. D. Samuel W. Lambert, M. D. 

SURGEONS 

Robert F. Weir, M. D. Francis W. Murray, M. D. 

Percy R. Bolton, M.D. 

Attending Staff 
Medical Service 
First Division Second Division 

ATTENDING PHYSICIANS 

Lewis A. Conner, M. D. William R. Williams, M. D. 

ASSOCIATE ATTENDING PHYSICIANS 

Joseph C. Roper, M. D. Theo. B. Barringer. Jr., M. D. 

Nellis B. Foster, M.D. Edward Cussler, M.D. 

ASSISTANT ATTENDING PHYSICIANS 

Ralph G. Stillman. M.D. Benj. Michailovsky, M.D. 

Arthur L. Holland, M. D. Harold E. B. Pardee, M. D. 

Robert A. Cooke, M. D. 

Surgical Service 

First Division Second Division 

ATTENDING SURGEONS 

Charles L. Gibson, M. D. Eugene H. Pool, M. D. 

ASSOCIATE ATTENDING SURGEONS 

Percy R. Turnure, M. D. Frederick W. Bancroft M. D. 

James M. Hitzrot, M. D. Seward Erdman, M. D. 

Burton J. Lee, M. D. 

ASSISTANT ATTENDING SURGEONS 

Charles E. Farr, M. D. John A. Vietor, M. D. 

Paul A. Dineen, M. D. 



Specialists 



NEUROLOGISTS 

J. Ramsey Hunt, M. D. Foster Kennedy, M. D. 

OPHTHALMOLOGISTS 

Coleman W. Cutler, M. D. Francis W. Shine, M. D. 

OTOLOGIST 

James P. Erskine, M. D. 

SYPHILOLOGISTS 

Fielding Lewis Taylor, M. D. James M. Kent, M. D. 

William J. Elser. M. D., Director of Laboratories 
Oswald S. Lowsley, M. D., Director Dept. Urology 
Archibald H. Busby, M. D., Director Dept. Radiology 
Henry J. Spencer, M. D., Physician to Training School 



Faculty and Teaching Staff 

Directress of the Training School 

Minnie H. Jordan, R. N., 

New York Hospital Training School, New York City. 

Assistant Directress 
M. Abbie Robinson, R. N., 

New York Hospital Training School, New York City. 

Instructors 

Lydia E. Anderson, R. N., 

New York Hospital Training School, New York City. 

Sarah E. Moore, R. N., 

New York Hospital Training School, New York City. 

Esther Eveleigh, 

New York State College for Teachers, Albany, N. Y. 

Thelma Pfeiffer, 

Battle Creek Sanitorium. School, Battle Creek, Michigan. 

Lecturers 

Ralph G. Stillman, M. D., 

Henry J. Spencer, M. D., 

Paul A. Dineen, M. D., 

Hannah L. Josephi. R. N., 
New York Hospital Training School, New York City. 



Supervisors 

Isabel J. Walton, R. N., Out Patients Dept. 
A. Maud Moffatt, R. N., Private Patients Building. 
Mary E. YVarrixger. R. N., Public Operating Room. 
Irene Field, R. N., Private Operating Room. 
Tassie M. Stevens, R. X., Urological Department. 
Elsie G. Davies, R. N., Night Supervisor. 

Head Nurses and Assistant Instructors 

Nellie M. Rough, R. N., Private Pavilion. 
Olive Van C. Secord, R. N., Private Pavilion. 
Maude O. E. Lund, R. N., Private Pavilion. 
Marie Frasius, R. N., Male Med. Wards. 
Helen Savre, R. N., Female Med. Wards. 
Edith B. Jones, R. N., 1st Surg. Wards. 
Eileen Dalv, R. N., 2nd Surg. Wards. 
Isabel O. Cernv, R. N., Children's Wards. 
Hazel Emmett. R. N., Admission Wards. 
Kathrvn Ryan, R. N., Suture Nurse. 
Eunice Minor, R. N., Suture Nurse. 
Eleanor Bartlett, R. N., Suture Nurse. 

Matron Nurses Home 

Albertine L. Given 




n e- 



BRIEF HISTORY OF THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 
AND TRAINING SCHOOL 

The New York Hospital, the second oldest hospital in 
America, received its charter of incorporation from George 
Third of England, on the 13th day of June, 1771, under the 
title of Society of New York Hospital, in the City of New 
York in America; subsequently by an Act of the Legis- 
lature in 1810 the title was changed to the Society of the 
New York Hospital. 

Although only a stone's throw from the present site 
of the Brooklyn Bridge, the building known as the New 
York Hospital was erected so far out of town that it was 
considered at too great a distance from the activities of 
the City. This Institution added new buildings and con- 
tinued its usefulness to the community until 1874, when 
it was deemed advisable to rind a new location. The prop- 
erty known as the Thorne Mansion was purchased ; this 
was located on the south side of Sixteenth Street, between 
Fifth and Sixth Avenues, and extending through to Fif- 
teenth Street. In 1877 the buildings were erected and 
ready for use, some of which are still occupied. 

Shortly after the opening of the Hospital it was deter- 
mined to establish a Training School for Nurses, which 
would offer to a limited number of young women desirous 
of devoting themselves to the care of the sick, the oppor- 
tunity for education in the Art of Nursing. From the first 
class in 1878 until the present time almost 1.100 students 
have graduated from the School. Since its organization 
the Training School has undergone many changes and im- 
provements, as time and conditions have varied. 



11 



GENERAL STATEMENT 

The New York Hospital Training School was organ- 
ized in 1877, and as an integral part of the Hospital is 
under the same government. It is the purpose of the 
Governors to give a thorough scientific training to the 
student nurses, and prepare them for the many fields open 
to them. 

Equipment 

In 1890 an exceptionally well-equipped building was 
erected for the accommodations of the Nurses on the 
Hospital grounds and connected with the main building. 
Since that time the School has so increased that the Junior 
Nurses occupy two private residences opposite the Hospital. 

The Hospital affords exceptional advantages, con- 
taining in all its departments 300 beds, and treating 
annually 30,000 patients, in the "Medical, Surgical, Urologi- 
cal and Pediatric services. All these departments are 
under the supervision of graduate nurses, who give the 
students bedside instruction and ward training. 

Valuable experience is gained in the numerous clinics 
of the Out-patient Department, where over 14,000 patients 
are treated during the year. 

The Diet Kitchen is under the direction of two resi- 
dent Domestic Science graduates, who give instruction in 
the Diets in Disease, and conduct the practical classes. 

The Operating Rooms have competent Supervisors in 
charge, and the active Ambulance Service affords unusual 
opportunities for specializing in this branch of the work. 

The Hospital has no Maternity Wards, but affiliations 
exist with Sloane Hospital for Women, Lying-in Hospital, 
and Manhattan Maternity Hospital, at one of which each 
student is required to take a three months' course during 
her training. 

Well equipped class rooms are furnished for recitations 
and lectures, and for practical demonstrations. The school 
also possesses a Reference Library, which contains the 
standard reference and text books. 

12 



Requirements for Admission 

Candidates should be between twenty-one and thirty- 
three years of age, and must be single women or widows. 
They must be in sound physical condition, and send with 
their application a certificate from a physician. A blank 
form of this certificate of health will be sent to all regis- 
tered applicants for admission. They must also give the 
names and addresses of two persons, not relatives, to whom 
the Hospital may refer. A High School education, or its 
equivalent is required, and women of superior qualifica- 
tions will be preferred. 

Candidates when called are expected to report promptly, 
and to bring with them the means of returning to their 
homes, should they not successfully pass their preliminary 
term. Any change of address of a candidate whose name 
is on the waiting list, should be immediately reported to 
the Directress of the Training School. 

The qualifications of pupils for the work are deter- 
mined by the Directress of Nurses, and it is her privilege 
to retain or dismiss them at the end of the Preliminary 
period. She may also, with the approval of the Execu- 
tive Committee, terminate at any time the connection of 
any pupil with the School, for reasons which may be 
deemed sufficient. 

Expenses 

There are no tuition fees. Candidates are required 
to provide at their own expense the regulation uniform for 
the Probationary term, in accordance with specifications 
which will be furnished them upon appointment. 

If accepted as a pupil at the end of this period, the 
materials for the school uniform will be provided by the 
Hospital, also full maintenance, all necessary text books, 
and an allowance of ten dollars a month from date of 
entrance, for incidental expenses. 

Should the student leave the school for any reason, 
the uniforms become the property of the Hospital. The 

13 



text books remain the property of the Institution, unless 
the student is desirous of retaining them at cost price. 

Hours of Duty 

The hours of duty average eight hours daily, or fifty- 
two hours weekly. The nurses are allowed one afternoon 
each week and half of Sunday off duty. Night nurses have 
from two to three days vacation at the end of the service, 
depending on the length of time. 

While in the Operating Room, the time may be irregu- 
lar, and students are expected to meet emergencies which 
may arise cheerfully and willingly. 

Vacation — Leave of Absence 

A vacation of three weeks is granted each year. Pupils 
are not permitted during their course of instruction to 
nurse sick relatives, nor to absent themselves for other 
personal reasons. Absences are not allowed; except for 
extreme cause, and for a limited time. If for any reason 
the pupil is obliged to be away from the school for a 
period exceeding four weeks, the date of her returning to 
the school, and her class standing will be determined by 
the Directress of Nurses. All time lost for any reason 
must be made up. 

Illness 

In illness the pupils are cared for gratuitously by a 
physician appointed by the Board of Governors. 

Recreation: 

Realizing the value of relaxation and that good spirits are 
as essential to success in nursing as in other lines of work and 
study, the student nurses are encouraged in a wholesome, 
social and recreational life. An attractive reception room, 
tennis courts and roof garden are at their disposal for enter- 
tainment, exercise and relaxation, and through the winter 
season tickets for theatres and concerts are provided for their 
entertainment. 

14 



Course of Instruction 

The course of instruction covers a period of three 
years from the date of entrance. During the last six 
months of the course the services are elective. The stud- 
ent will be privileged to have additional experience in any 
service in which she desires to specialize, or she may choose 
any two of the following elective courses: 

1. Mental and Nervous Diseases, at Bloomingdale 
Hospital. 

2. Communicable Diseases, at Willard-Parker 
Hospital. 

3. Visiting Nursing, at Henry Street Settlement. 

4. Hospital Social Service, in Social Service De- 
partment, New York Hospital. 

Examinations 

The standing of the student is based on her ability to 
meet the physical and mental strain of nursing, her deport- 
ment, practical work and the results of theoretical and prac- 
tical examinations. Final examinations are conducted by a 
committee of the Medical Board. 

Complete records of class work, examinations and gen- 
eral deportment of all pupils are kept on file in the 
Training School Office. 

Graduation 

Graduating Exercises are held annually in March. The 
diploma and medal of the School are awarded to those who 
have passed the examinations and completed satisfactorily 
the full term of training. This diploma entitles the gradu- 
ate to take the State Examinations required to qualify 
her as a registered nurse. 

Alumnae Association 

All registered graduates of the School are qualified 
for membership in the Alumnae Association, which was 
organized in 1893. and has over six hundred members. This 
Association is affiliated with the County and State Organi- 
zations, as well as the American Nurses' Association. 

15 



Under the direction of its Executive Board the Alumnae 
Association has established a Registry and Club, at 317 
West 45th Street, where there are attractive living accom- 
modations and club-rooms for its members. 

The object of the Association is the promotion of 
unity and good feeling among the members, and the ad- 
vancement of the profession of nursing. Under the direc- 
tion of the Alumnae Association a Sick Benefit Fund is 
maintained. In case of illness the members are entitled 
to an allowance for six weeks during the year. 

A room in the Private Patients Pavilion has been pro- 
vided by the Governors of the Hospital for the use of sick 
nurses, where they may have, without expense, the advan- 
tages of medical and nursing care. 

Correspondence 

All inquiries concerning the Training School should 
be directed to the Directress of Nurses, 8 West Sixteenth 
Street, New York. 

Applications will be considered throughout the year. 
It is desired that a personal application be made if pos- 
sible, and the Directress of Nurses will interview the can- 
didates on Monday and Thursday mornings, between the 
hours of 11 and 1 o'clock. 



16 



COURSE OF INSTRUCTION 

Anatomy and Physiology 

This course is planned to give a practical working 
knowledge of the structure and functions of the body. 

Laboratory work includes dissection and demonstra- 
tion. 

Bacteriology 

The object of this course is to help the pupils to 
understand the characteristics and habits of micro-organ- 
isms, so that they may be able to protect themselves, their 
patients and the public from infection. To teach them 
something of laboratory technique, so that they will appre- 
ciate better the necessity for surgical asepsis and learn 
to apply the same careful methods in their nursing pro- 
cedures, cleaning, cooking, etc. 

Hygiene 

The object of this course is to impress upon the pupil 
the importance of good health, to help her to protect her- 
self and keep herself well through practicing the funda- 
mental laws of health, to develop a rational and scientific 
attitude towards the whole question of health preservation 
and disease prevention. 

Chemistry 

This course serves as a basis for the more intelligent 
study of Physiology, Dietetics, Materia Medica and other 
nursing subjects. To make the pupil more observant of 
the chemical phenomena of every day life. 

Nutrition and Cookery 

A study of the principles and methods of simple cook- 
ery for well and sick people, and the nutritive values of 
foods and the preparation of a balanced dietary. To apply 

19 



the fundamental principles of cookery and nutrition to 
the dietary treatment of the more common diseases. 

Drugs and Solutions 

A study of the more important drugs, the weighing 
and measurement of drugs accurately, standard solutions 
and the pharmaceutical preparations used in the Wards, 
the terms and symbols used in Materia Medica, as a prep- 
aration for further study of therapeutic action of drugs. 

Principles and Practice of Nursing, Including Bandaging 

The object of this course is to give a clear understand- 
ing of the fundamental principles which underlie all good 
nursing, to develop habits of observation, system, economy 
and manual dexterity, and to establish a uniform and fin- 
ished technique in nursing practice ; to test out the apti- 
tude of pupils with a view to selecting those who are fitted 
to continue the work. 

Nursing Ethics 

This course deals with the principles of Ethical Con- 
duct in relation to the attitude of the nurse toward various 
problems, her obligation to herself, to the profession and 
to the public. 

History of Nursing 

A studv of Nursing History, reviewing the early 
growth of the nursing profession, the stages of develop- 
ment through which it has passed, the people and influ- 
ences which have aided in establishing the profession upon 
its present basis. 

Materia Medica 

A studv of the sources, classification and therapeutic 
action of drugs ; their dosage and administration, their 
dangerous and untoward actions. 

20 



Medical Nursing 

The object of this course is to give the nurse a practi- 
cal understanding of the causes, symptoms, prevention and 
treatment of the various types of Medical Diseases, so 
that she may intelligently care for her patients, and give 
skilled assistance to the Physician. 

Surgical Nursing 

A study of the principal surgical conditions, their na- 
ture, causes, complications, treatment and nursing care. 
The nursing care of emergencies following accidents and 
surgical operations, including hemorrhage, burns and frac- 
tures. 

Diseases of Infants and Children 

This course deals with the care of the normal and the 
abnormal child, the principal diseases which affect children, 
what their special manifestations are, and how to adapt 
nursing measures to fit the needs of sick children. The 
preparation of infant feedings, emphasizing the importance 
of proper feeding as a therapeutic measure in the diseases 
of infancy. 

Operating Technique 

The instruction in the technique of the Operating 
Room, the principles and practice of asepsis and antisepsis, 
the preparation, sterilization and use of all supplies, and 
preparation for the various operations. 

Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat 

Lectures dealing with the care and treatment of the 
eye. ear. nose and throat in normal and abnormal condi- 
tions ; to arouse an interest in this branch of nursing which 
will lead nurses into the field equipped with a basis for 
further specialization for preventive and educational work. 

21 



Obstetrical Nursing 

This course consists of lectures, clinics and demonstra- 
tions, the object — to make nurses intelligent and com- 
petent in the nursing care of Obstetrical cases, both nor- 
mal and abnormal, and in the care of small babies ; to 
arouse an interest in Obstetrical nursing and a keener 
appreciation of its importance. 

Professional Problems 

A study of the problems which will confront the pupils 
when they graduate, and to help them meet their difficul- 
ties in a rational, right-minded and effective way. To 
awaken their interest in professional organization. 



22 




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ELECTIVE COURSES 

Mental and Nervous Diseases Including Massage 

Introductory lectures on the comparative anatomy in 
relation to instinctive and acquired behavior. The rela- 
tion of fault}- adaptability to habit and conduct disorders 
and mental suffering; the nature causes, characteristic care 
and management of the various types of the minor and 
major Mental disorders presented in lectures, lantern slides 
and clinical demonstrations : the incidence of mental suffer- 
ing in everyday life, in general hospital practice and in 
psychiatric hospitals and significance for nurse training 
and practice. 

Massage: Lecture-, demonstration and practice. This 
course deals with the history and practice of muscular manipu- 
lation of the body. Indications and contraindications for treat- 
ment and various modes of application, local and general 
effects. 

Communicable Diseases 

A study of the nature of the principal infectious dis- 
eases, to ensure intelligent nursing care and prevent the 
spread of disease to others. In Public Health Nursing, em- 
phasis is laid on the importance of detecting the early symp- 
toms of infectious diseases, and the social and economic 
aspects of the whole question of preventable disease. 

Laboratory instruction is given in the preparation of 
diphtheria antitoxin, various vaccines and sera. 

Visiting Nursing Service 

The aim of this course is to give the student an intro- 
duction to the held of Public Health Xursing. As only 
ten percent of sickness is cared for in the Hospitals, society 
has come to recognize the social and educational value of 
nurses in the homes. The Visiting Xurse Service teaches 
the student to give the sick in their homes skilled nursing 

25 



care, and also as far as possible to solve the related social 
and economic problems that are met with in the families. 

Hospital Social Service 

The object of this course is to give the pupil nurse 
an introduction to extension medical service in the Social 
Service Department of this Hospital. This will be given 
through field work under supervision in the wards and 
clinics and in the homes and through lectures. It will 
relate the need for education in hygiene and prevention, 
in order to complete the bedside care and to prevent re- 
currence. She will be shown the continuity of care of the 
hospital social service ; — the correct approach to the patient 
and his family upon his entry to the hospital ; the close 
co-operation with the medical and nursing service and, if 
necessary, the rendering proper convalescent care after he 
is discharged to either a special home or to his own home, 
and the giving of encouragement until he is ultimately 
discharged well from the follow clinic of the hospital. 

Visits will be arranged to the important convalescent 
homes, and the nurse will become somewhat familiar with 
the health work and institutions of the City. 

Lectures will be given on the following subjects: 

Organization, Social History and Budget Making, 
Proper Convalescence, Co-operation with Other Agencies, 
Health Classes, Race Psychology. 






26 



[ 



THE 
NEW YORK HOSPITAL 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 



PRELIMINARY ANNOUNCEMENT 

BY 

THE SOCIETY OF THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 

YORK AVENUE AT SEVENTIETH STREET 
NEW YORK 




THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 



THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Associated with Cornell University 

The Course of Study 

The curriculum now being reorganized will extend 
over a period of three years with ten weeks vacation. 
The first eight months will be devoted to the study of 
pre-clinical subjects— anatomy, physiology, chemistry, 
psychology, hygiene, bacteriology, pathology, nutri- 
tion and cookery, materia medica, elementary nursing, 
nursing history, ethics, social and economic aspects of 
health and disease. Subsequent time will be devoted 
to the study of clinical subjects— medical nursing, dieto- 
therapy, surgical nursing, pediatric nursing, obstetrical 
and gynecological nursing, communicable disease nurs- 
ing, psychiatric nursing and public health nursing with 
necessary theoretical courses. 

Students will be admitted September 30, 1932. 

[3] 



Association with Cornell University 

In June of 1927 the New York Hospital formed 
an association with the Cornell University Medical 
College known as The New York Hospital-Cornell 
Medical College Association. Faculty members of the 
Medical College will participate in the instruction of 
students. 

Negotiations are now in progress to obtain for stu- 
dents completing the curriculum of the School of 
Nursing credit at Cornell University toward the 
Bachelor of Science degree in the College of Home 
Economics or the Bachelor of Arts degree in the Col- 
lege of Arts and Sciences. 

Facilities for Teaching 

The new hospital opening September 1932 has a 
potential capacity of one thousand medical, surgical, 
pediatric, obstetrical, gynecological and psychiatric 
patients and will provide unusual clinical facilities for 
teaching students in nursing. A large out-patient de- 
partment will give opportunity for the study of am- 
bulatory patients; Willard Parker Hospital and the 
Henry Street Visiting Nurse Association offer affilia- 
tions for the study of communicable diseases and public 
health nursing, respectively. 

Well equipped class rooms, laboratories and libraries 
are provided in the new nurses' building and in Cornell 
University Medical College. 

[4] 



Housing Accommodations 

A beautiful new fireproof, sixteen story residence 
has been erected adjacent to the hospital and the Med- 
ical College for the students and staff of the School of 
Nursing. Every effort has been made in its construction 
to provide for the normal healthy life of students. Each 
student will have an attractively furnished single room 
with stationary lavatory. Each residence floor of fifty 
bedrooms has a small sitting room, with adjoining 
kitchenette, for informal social affairs, laundryette and 
adequate bathing and toilet facilities. Lounges, read- 
ing, reception, recreation and dining rooms are gener- 
ously provided. 

The major part of the ninth floor has been reserved 
for an infirmary of fifteen beds which will have the 
necessary staff for promoting student and staff health, 
as well as caring for common minor illnesses. For se- 
rious illnesses students will be cared for in the hospital 
gratuitously for a limited time. Vaccinations against 
typhoid fever and smallpox, Schick and Dick tests will 
be requested of all students before or after admission 
to the school. 

Admission Requirements 

Applicants for admission to the School of Nursing 
must present credentials of graduation from an accred- 
ited high school or other recognized preparatory school 
with fifteen units of study as follows: 

[si 



English 3 units 

History i unit 

Mathematics 2 units— Algebra 1 unit- 
Plane Geometry 1 
unit 

Science 2 units— Preferably Chem- 
istry and Physics 

Foreign Language 4 units 

Electives 3 units 

Total 15 units 

Applicants who have had college study will be given 
preference in admission to the school. 

Besides these scholastic admission requirements, stu- 
dents should be at least twenty and not over thirty years 
of age and must present evidence of physical and per- 
sonal fitness for nursing. All applications for admission 
should be addressed to the Director of the School of 
Nursing, York Avenue at 70th Street, New York, N.Y., 
and should be filed not later than June 1 st, for admission 
to the school the fall of 1932. 

A personal conference of the student and her parent 
or guardian with the Director of the School of Nursing 
is desirable and should be arranged at the time of ap- 
plication or soon thereafter, if possible. An appoint- 
ment for an interview can be made upon request. 

Advanced Standing 
Advanced standing may be granted those students 

C6] 



who present credentials showing satisfactory comple- 
tion of courses of study taken in colleges or other schools 
of nursing deemed of similar and equal value to those 
given in the New York Hospital School of Nursing. 

Requirements of 
Scholarship and for Graduation 

Students will be graded in their studies as follows: 
A— excellent; B— good; C— average ; D— pass; E— con- 
ditioned; F— failure. 

A grade of C or better must be acquired in at least 
two-thirds of the credit hours taken in any one year. 
No credit will be given for a course graded E unless 
a passing mark is secured through the repetition of the 
course or by examination determined upon the judg- 
ment of the Committee on Promotions. Courses marked 
F— failure, will require repetition. 

Upon the recommendations of the Faculty of the 
School of Nursing the Diploma in Nursing will be 
granted by the Board of Governors of the Society of 
the New York Hospital to those who have satisfac- 
torily completed the prescribed curriculum in nursing. 

The Faculty of the School of Nursing reserves the 
right to recommend to the Council of the School of 
Nursing the withdrawal of any student because of con- 
tinuous poor scholarship, ill-health or misconduct. 



Fees 

Matriculation Fee $ 10.00 

Payable at first registration; not refunded. 

Laboratory Fee 10.00 

Payable at first registration; not refunded. 

Tuition Fees for First and Second 

Trimesters 100.00 

$50.00 payable at registration each Tri- 
mester; not refunded after second week for 
any cause of withdrawal. 

Health Service Fees for First and 
Second Trimesters First Year . . . 10.00 
$5.00 payable at registration each Tri- 
mester; not refunded. 

Student Activities Fees— Annually 

$5.00 i5-oo 

Payable in two installments First and Sec- 
ond Trimesters each year; not refunded. 

Graduation Fee 10.00 

Payable at registration Third Trimester, 
Third Year; refunded if student is not 
graduated. 

Total Fees for Three Years . . $155.00 

All fees should be paid by check, money order or 
draft drawn to the order of the New York Hospital. 

[8] 




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RESIDENCE OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 



Maintenance and General Expenses 

Room, board and limited laundry will be provided 
each student upon her admission to the school. Uni- 
forms also will be provided each student, but in case 
of withdrawal of the student from the school, will re- 
main the property of the school. Text books and mis- 
cellaneous expenses, largely determined by personal 
requirements, must be paid for by each student; these 
may be estimated to be approximately $25.00 per year. 
As regular physical exercise will be required of each 
student, the necessary regulation suit must be provided 
by the student. 

A complete announcement of the School of Nursing 
is now in course of preparation and will be forwarded 
upon request. 



►->—<-< 



Address all communications concerning the school 
or concerning admissions to: 

DIRECTOR OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 

YORK AVENUE AT SEVENTIETH STREET 

NEW YORK, NEW YORK 

[10] 






The Society of the New York Hospital 

Governors 

Edward W. Sheldon President 

Wilson M. Powell Vice-President 

Bronson Winthrop Treasurer 

Henry W. deForest Arthur Iselin 
Howard Townsend G. Beekman Hoppin 
George F. Baker Lewis Cass Ledyard, Jr. 
Augustine J. Smith R. Horace Gallatin 
Charles S. Brown Walter Jennings 
Frank K. Sturgis Joseph H. Choate, Jr. 
Henry G. Barbey Frank L. Polk 
Cornelius N. Bliss Frederic W. Allen- 
Paul TUCKERMAN JOHN HaY WHITNEY 

William Woodward William Vincent Astor 

Barklie McKee Henry 

G. Howard W 7 ise, Secretary 

United States Trust Company of New York 
Assistant Treasurer 



New York Hospital-Cornell Medical 
College Association 

(not incorporated) 

Joint Administrative Board 

Edward W. Sheldon, Chairman Livingston Ferrand 

Frank L. Polk J. Du Pratt White 

William Woodward Walter L. Niles, M.D. 

J. Pierpont Morgan 

G. Canby Robinson, M.D., Director 



Anna D. Wolf, M. A., R.N., Director of the School of Nursing 

En] 



THE SOCIETY OF THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 



The 
NEW YORK HOSPITAL 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 



PRELIMINARY ANNOUNCEMENT 



Complete Announcement will be sent upon request 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

The New York Hospital School of Nursing which is an 
integral part of the second oldest hospital in America, main- 
tained by private endowment, offers a three year course of 
study in nursing to qualified young women. The curriculum 
includes the basic sciences and principles underlying nursing 
and the methods to use in the care of the sick, in the preven- 
tion of disease and in health instruction. 

Requirements for Admission 

The matriculation requirement is satisfactory graduation 
from an accredited high school or recognized preparatory 
school in which the following units of study have been taken: 

English 3 units 

History 1 unit 

Civics -J unit 

Mathematics 2 units 

(Algebra 1 unit; plane geometry 1 unit) 

Science 2 units 

(Chemistry required; physics advised) 

Foreign language 3 units 

(Three units of one language or two in each of two) 

Electives H units 

Besides these scholastic requirements students should be at 
least nineteen and not over thirty years of age and must present 
evidence of physical and personal fitness for nursing. 

Accrediting by Cornell University 

To those students who may later wish to matriculate at the 
New York State College of Home Economics, Cornell Uni- 
versity, if they present all other necessary requirements, the 
curriculum of the New York Hospital School of Nursing 
will be credited to the amount of not less than forty-five hours, 
which is equivalent to one and a half academic years of college 
credit, toward the Bachelor of Science degree. 



Expenses 

Matriculation Fee $10.00 

Tuition Fee 60.00 

Laboratory Fee 10.00 

Health Service Fee 5.00 

Chemistry Lab. Breakage Fee 5.00 

Graduation Fee 15.00 

Tuition Fee, Public Health Nursing 25.00 $130.00 

In addition a Student Activity Fee of $5.00 is paid each 
year to the Student Organization. 

A single room with board and limited laundry is provided 
each student in a new fireproof building with adequate social 
facilities. 

First year students must furnish their own aprons and bibs, 
purchased through the school of nursing at a cost of approxi- 
mately $16.00. Except for these all uniforms are furnished 
each student during her course of study. 

The cost of text books, educational supplies and miscella- 
neous items largely determined by personal requirements 
must be borne by each student. These are estimated to amount 
to about $75.00 for the first year and $50.00 for the second 
and third years. 

For the three year course it is estimated that the total cost 
to the student will be approximately $360.00. 

Registration 

Only one class is admitted to the school each year. The 
next class will be registered 

If you fill the above requirements and are interested in 
entering the New York Hospital School of Nursing a com- 
plete bulletin of the school together with an application 
blank will be sent to you upon request. 

Address all correspondence to the Director of the School 
of Nursing, 525 East 68th Street, New York, New York. 



THE 
NEW YORK HOSPITAL 

ITS PROGRAM 




LOOKING NORTH ON YORK AVENUE 



THE 
NEW YORK HOSPITAL 

ITS PROGRAM 



A PRELIMINARY ANNOUNCEMENT 

BY 

THE SOCIETY OF THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 

1931 



Foreword 

The Society of the New York Hospital, 
chartered June 13, 1771, maintains: 

NEW YORK HOSPITAL 

6 TO l6 WEST SIXTEENTH STREET 
NEW YORK CITY 

BLOOMINGDALE HOSPITAL 

FOR MENTAL DISEASES 
WHITE PLAINS, NEW YORK 

CAMPBELL COTTAGES 

FOR CONVALESCENT CHILDREN 
WHITE PLAINS, NEW YORK 

In a little more than a year the New York 
Hospital will move to its new home in the 
teaching hospital center which is now being 
built along the East River, just north of the 
Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research. 
Although there have been a number of an- 
nouncements dealing with this development, 
it is believed that those whose interest in the 
Society is close and personal will welcome a 
more complete statement. 



The Society of the New York Hospital 

Governors 

Edward W. Sheldon President 

Bronson Winthrop Treasurer 

Henry W. deForest Arthur Iselin 

Howard Townsend G. Beekman Hoppin 

George F. Baker* Lewis Cass Ledyard, Jr. 

Augustine J. Smith R. Horace Gallatin 

Charles S. Brown Walter Jennings 

Frank K. Sturgis Joseph H. Choate, Jr. 

Henry G. Barbey Frank L. Polk 

Cornelius N. Bliss Frederic W. Allen 

Paul Tuckerman John Hay Whitney 

William Woodward William Vincent Astor 

G. Howard Wise, Secretary 

United States Trust Company of New York 

Assistant Treasurer 

New York Hospital-Cornell Medical 
College Association 

(not incorporated) 

Joint Administrative Board 

Edward W. Sheldon, Chairman Livingston Farrand 
Frank L. Polk J. Du Pratt White 

William Woodward Walter L. Niles, M.D. 

J. Pierpont Morgan 

G. Canby Robinson, M.D. 3 Director 

♦Deceased 






The New York Hospital 

zA Teacht7tg Center 

Governor Colden, whom the "Sons of Liberty" 
burned in effigy, had been replaced by the concilia- 
tory Sir Henry Moore. The hated Stamp Act had 
been repealed. In the troubled decade that preceded 
the Revolution, 1769 was one of the quietest years. 
Citizens of New York had time to turn some thought 
to the needs of peace, chief among which was the 
need for a hospital. 

In the entire Colony, with its rapidly growing 
population of 300,000, there was not a single hos- 
pital. The plight of the sick poor was pitiable. 
Equally serious was the fact that no adequate provi- 
sion was being made for the practical instruction of 
future doctors. Thus it was, when Dr. Samuel Bard 
delivered the memorable plea that led to the found- 
ing of the New York Hospital, he appealed for the 
establishment of a teaching hospital — one where men 
might be trained properly to alleviate the suffering 
and guard the health of all. 

First among this City's hospitals, second to be 
founded in this country, the New York Hospital was 
founded as a teaching hospital, devoted to the dis- 
covery and dissemination, as well as to the most direct 
and humane applications, of medical and surgical 

m 



knowledge. Although the War of the Revolution 
delayed until 1791 the formal opening of the New 
York Hospital, it then rapidly gained national rec- 
ognition as an outstanding school of medicine and 
surgery. Its first staff was organized as a medical 
faculty. At one time as many as 600 students at- 
tended the clinics and lectures of its staff. The stu- 
dents of King's College were the first to enjoy these 
privileges. From 1807 t0 ^69 those of the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons received instruction at 
the New York Hospital. Members of its staff par- 
ticipated in founding the medical colleges of Rutgers 
and of New York University, and from 1866 to 
1869 tne Hospital housed the latter school. 

For the last two decades the chief educational 
affiliation of the New York Hospital has been with 
the Medical College of Cornell University, which 
has maintained high scholarship, forceful and pro- 
gressive teaching and a constant pursuit of new med- 
ical knowledge. It was in response to the desire of the 
Governors of the Hospital to add to its own splendid 
traditions as a teaching institution that the late 
George F. Baker, in 1 9 1 2, gave the funds enabling 
the Hospital to devote an additional portion of its 
wards and services to teaching, in which the Hos- 
pital staff and the College faculty cooperated. 

When, in 1927, the legacies of the late Payne 
Whitney opened the way for the New York Hospital 

[6] 



to make another notable advance as a center of hu- 
manitarian service, teaching and medical research, 
it was natural that it should wish to strengthen its 
relationship with the Medical School. This was ac- 
complished by an agreement with Cornell Univer- 
sity under which a Joint Administrative Board was 
established, composed of three Governors of the 
New York Hospital, three representatives of Cor- 
nell, with J. Pierpont Morgan as the seventh mem- 
ber. This Board, which is unincorporated, serves as 
a medium to facilitate attainment of the mutual 
objects of both institutions. 

The Need for a New Building 

The first home of the New York Hospital served 
it for nearly a century. There are still residents of 
this City who remember the venerable gray stone 
building just north of Duane Street, on Broadway. 
In 1 877 the Hospital, in order to expand its service 
to the public, moved to West Sixteenth Street near 
Fifth Avenue. Slowly the growing City rose higher, 
shutting off the light, shifting the population which 
the Hospital served. The second building itself was 
representative of sound steps toward much that is 
best in modern hospital construction, but the advances 
which have been made during the past fifty years 
have added other compelling reasons why the Hos- 
pital should seek a new home. 

[7] 



The New Home of the Hospital 

In planning the new home of the New York 
Hospital, the Governors have thought not alone of 
the immediate needs of the institution and the public 
which it serves, but in terms of the next hundred 
years. First came the problem of an adequate and 
ample site. This was acquired, over a number of years, 
by the purchase of virtually the entire area of three 
city blocks along York Avenue between Sixty-eighth 
and Seventy-first Streets. The East River, on the east, 
and the grounds of the Rockefeller Institute for 
Medical Research, on the south, insure against en- 
croachment and shutting off of sunlight. 

Ground was broken for the new plant on June 1 7, 
1929, and the cornerstone of the Hospital's new 
main building was laid on June 12, 1930. Since then 
there has risen a majestic group of buildings repre- 
sentative of an effort to create the ideal facilities and 
environment for a teaching hospital center. 

Chief among them is the central building of the 
Hospital, an imposing structure twenty-seven stories 
in height. It faces Sixty-eighth Street in a plot cover- 
ing two entire blocks. On the east it is flanked by 
three special hospitals, one for women, another for 
children and a third for curative treatment of nerv- 
ous and mental illness; on the west by the buildings 
of the Medical College. All are joined with the main 

[8] 



structure to form one unified hospital group, admir- 
ably equipped both for teaching and for that first 
purpose of a hospital — the care of the sick. 

In the block to the north of this group are the 
Nurses' Residence and School and a compound build- 
ing containing the power plant, service building, 
laundry, parking garage and, in the tower above, 
an employees' dormitory. This northern group is 
joined to the Hospital by tunnels running under 
Seventieth Street. 

When opened in the fall of 1932 the project will 
provide approximately 1,000 beds for patients and 
correspondingly ample facilities for treatment of 
out-patients. There will be living quarters for ap- 
proximately 125 resident doctors, 500 nurses, and 
200 employees. Instruction will be provided for 
about 300 undergraduate medical students and for 
many advanced students. 

The Main Hospital 

The main building of the Hospital is in reality 
three buildings, one superimposed upon another; the 
general hospital, the private hospital, and the living 
quarters for the resident staff. The general hospital 
forms the base of the structure. Its two southern 
wings, with ample sun rooms, house the medical and 
surgical wards, devoted primarily to the Hospital's 
traditional mission of relief for the sick poor. One of 

[9] 



the northern wings contains the out-patient service ; 
the other, manifold facilities for various therapies 
and radiology. Floor for floor the nature of the out- 
patient and bed patient facilities correspond, so that 
the closest unity may be preserved in each depart- 
ment of the medical and surgical services. 

In the central section of the general hospital every 
ward floor has its own diet kitchens, treatment rooms, 
diagnostic laboratories and rooms for teaching. Each 
floor is thus virtually a hospital unit in itself. 

Along the corridors which connect the main build- 
ing with the special hospitals on the east, and the 
Medical College on the west, are laboratories de- 
voted to diagnostic purposes and to those phases of 
research most closely related to problems involved in 
the immediate needs of the patients. 

All the operating rooms of the main hospital, 
nineteen in number, including the surgical amphi- 
theatre, are on the tenth and eleventh floors, which 
divide the general from the private hospital. 

The Special Hospitals 

The three special hospitals facing the East River 
are all integral units of the New York Hospital. 
Each in itself, however, is a complete institution 
for the care of the sick, teaching and research in its 
special field. The Women's Hospital at Seventieth 
Street has been erected with funds provided by the 

[10] 



Laura Spelman Memorial in memory of the late 
Mrs. John D. Rockefeller. It is the new home of the 
Lying-in Hospital which becomes part of the New 
York Hospital. The two hospitals were first affiliated 
more than a century ago. The New York Hospital 
now incorporates the work of the Lying-in Hospital, 
this expansion being made possible not only by a trans- 
fer of the endowment of the Lying-in Hospital but 
also by generous gifts by J. Pierpont Morgan, the 
late George F. Baker and George F. Baker, Jr., to 
the New York Hospital. 

Funds for the erection of the Children's Hospital, 
which will be joined to and work in closest coopera- 
tion with the Lying-in Hospital, were provided by 
the Manhattan Maternity and Dispensary which has 
been acquired by the New York Hospital. The Psy- 
chiatry Hospital, for which Payne Whitney made 
special provision in his will, is the most southern of 
the buildings facing the East River. Through the 
Society of the New York Hospital, it will be affiliated 
with Bloomingdale Hospital at White Plains, where 
curative work requiring a longer period of patient 
residence and an ideal community environment will 
be continued. Bloomingdale Hospital, maintained by 
the Society since 1821, was the first provision made 
in New York State for the mentally ill. 



en] 




LOOKING NORTHWEST 



Plan of Organization 



Even the most modern of teaching hospital build- 
ings and equipment depend primarily for their ef- 
fectiveness, in relief of the sick and the advancement 
of medicine, on the character and ability of the phy- 
sicians and surgeons who compose the staff. 

The Hospital staff is being organized in five divi- 
sions. The first two, those of Medicine and Surgery, 
are to care also for all the special fields other than 
those dealing with the care of women and children 
and the treatment of mental troubles. These are to 
be included in the divisions of Obstetrics and Gyne- 
cology, Pediatrics, and Psychiatry. 

All medical teaching which has to do directly with 
the treatment of patients will be conducted by mem- 
bers of the Hospital staff who will also hold appoint- 
ments in the faculty of the College. The Surgeon- 
in-Chief of the Hospital, for instance, is to be the 
Professor of Surgery, and the Physician-in-Chief, 
the Professor of Medicine. 

Departmental Organization 

Each department is to be headed by a single chief 
of staff, who will devote his entire time to his duties 
within the Hospital with the unified and mutually 
helpful objects of giving the best possible care to 
patients, of conducting thorough teaching to medi- 

[13] 



cal students and graduates in medicine, and of pur- 
suing medical research. 

In order to attain these objectives each department 
staff will consist of a central group of men, closely 
attached to the head of the department and devoting 
their entire time to its work, and of a larger but thor- 
oughly affiliated and indispensable group of men who 
are also engaged in private practice. It is the aim to 
organize the staff in such a manner that the associa- 
tion of these groups will be intimate, cordial and con- 
stant. Each group should benefit by a continuous in- 
terplay of ideas and influences with the other. By 
such an organization, based on ideals of cooperation 
and mutual helpfulness, can clinical departments 
best carry out their varied and complex functions of 
the care of patients, of teaching and of research ac- 
tivities that are so closely allied and interdependent. 
No one of these functions can be neglected without 
harmful consequence to the others. 

Full-Time Staff 

The fact that each departmental chief will devote 
all his time to the Hospital and to teaching and re- 
search should insure that each department, includ- 
ing its wards, out-patient departments and labora- 
tories, as well as its staff, may be directed constantly 
by a man of high intellectual attainments, spiritual 
ideals and professional ability. It is believed that no 

[Hi 



man can exert his full energies in the development 
of a department who has to depend on his activities 
outside the Hospital and the School for a large part 
of his financial support. Consequently, full-time ap- 
pointments have been made not in the spirit of limit- 
ing the activities or restricting such men, but with a 
view to providing them with sufficient financial sup- 
port so that they may devote their whole energy, 
thought and spirit to the development and mainte- 
nance of high standards of service and attainment in 
their respective departments. 

Part-Time Staff 

The full-time group will form an important fea- 
ture of the staff, augmenting rather than replacing 
the staff of the Hospital as organized in the past. 
Numerically, the major portion of the staff will con- 
tinue to be composed of men who are also engaged 
in private practice. They are not only essential in 
order to link the Hospital to the community and to 
the general practice of medicine, but also for their 
influence on the full-time members of the staff and 
on students. 

Selection of the part-time staff is to be on the basis 
of their professional attainments and ideals, and their 
value as teachers. The careful appointments that have 
been made in the past to positions on the staff of the 
New York Hospital and to the faculty of Cornell 

[15] 



University Medical College fortunately have 
brought together a large number of physicians and 
surgeons who fulfill the requirements for organizing 
the part-time staff. As the Hospital has been oper- 
ated on this basis in the past, the new development 
only offers them wider opportunities than have been 
possible in the past. Under the new conditions these 
members of the staff will have better facilities for 
the exercise of their professional abilities ; greater 
opportunities to pass on their knowledge through 
teaching and to enlarge their contributions to med- 
ical science through research. 

Provision for a complete private patient section of 
the Hospital will also serve to give facilities for the 
practice of leaders who are members of the staff and 
of the teaching faculty. The provision of such facili- 
ties will tend to bring frequently to the Hospital the 
type of practitioners who are invaluable as teachers 
and as examples to the students. Their influence and 
standing will be a decided asset to the atmosphere and 
general spirit of the center. 

Special Services 

Several services are being provided in the Hospital 
to be used in common by all departments. There are 
to be central laboratories in which the more compli- 
cated diagnostic procedures will be carried out by 
experts in their respective fields. Although it is 

[16] 



planned that the simpler routine laboratory methods 
used in the study of patients be carried out within 
the various departments by their own staffs, much 
can be added in efficiency and accuracy by having 
well-organized central laboratories on which all de- 
partments may call. A series of such laboratories has 
been planned to accommodate various types of bac- 
teriological, chemical and microscopic work, but all 
under the direction of a single head. 

An extensive department of radiology is incor- 
porated in the plan, where not only examinations by 
means of the X-ray may be carried out, but where the 
X-ray is to be used for its therapeutic value. Depart- 
ments of physio- and hydro-therapy, occupational 
therapy and dieto-therapy are also to be used in com- 
mon by all departments not provided with their own 
facilities for such purposes. It is designed that all 
these activities should add to the educational and 
research facilities as well as to those for the treat- 
ment of patients. 

Public Health 

Modern medicine is laying ever greater emphasis 
on the problems of the prevention of disease. It is 
planned that the idea of preventive medicine should 
pervade the entire curriculum of the Medical School 
and be an ever present ideal in the Hospital, so that 
it should become a part of the thought and effort of 

[17] 



all students who pass through the School and of all 
members of the Hospital staff. Students should also 
gain an understanding of the methods and of the 
agencies now employed in conserving the public 
health, so that they may as physicians be intelligently 
cooperating adjuncts to the governmental and offi- 
cial efforts in this direction. A general hospital also 
affords an opportunity for study in epidemiology, 
vital statistics and other fields of public health which 
should be of great value to special students of public 
health. Together with workers in the field of medi- 
cal social service, the department of public health 
may make valuable contacts with the community and 
also serve as experts in many public health undertak- 
ings, thus making contributions which add distinctly 
to the usefulness of the teaching hospital center. 

Social Service 
A department of social service is planned, staffed 
by a group of persons technically trained in social 
work as related to medicine and to public health. 
Such a department adds greatly to the efficiency of a 
general hospital from the point of view of the ser- 
vice it renders to those who come to it for help in 
times of distress. Social service is a powerful thera- 
peutic agent in many cases. It also aids materially in 
developing a pervading atmosphere of understand- 
ing and effective sympathy which is so desirable in 

[18] 



all hospitals, but especially important in a teaching 
hospital, where students should see and feel the spirit 
of service intelligently applied in all its phases. In 
this latter respect, an efficient department of social 
service is to be regarded as an effective element in 
the training of physicians. 

Nursing 

The time has gone by when a school of nursing of 
the best type can be conducted merely as a by-product 
of the hospital nursing service. In order to attract 
and train women for leadership in nursing, educa- 
tional facilities comparable to those provided in 
other fields of education are necessary. A comfort- 
able and attractive residence for nurses containing 
teaching rooms, a library and recreational facili- 
ties is part of the new plant and will be important in 
building up a nursing school capable of training 
nurses to meet the high qualifications needed in the 
Hospital and in the community. 

Conclusion 

Holding fast to the principle that the interests of 
human welfare are to take precedence over all other 
considerations, the development of the New York 
Hospital will be accomplished so that all of its long 
established traditions may be preserved and its fields 
of usefulness be greatly widened. 

[19] 








| A || 




NEW YORK HOSPITAL 

A Century and a Quarter 

of Cancer Treatment 

THE Society of the New York Hospital was incorporated in 
1771 by royal charter from George III, but due to a fire 
and subsequent reconstruction, it was not occupied until 1776 
when several continental soldiers were hospitalized for casu- 
alties as a result of an engagement between shore batteries 
and two British warships attempting to force a passage up 
the Hudson. 

In 1798, the year the frigate Constitution made her maiden 
voyage, two people came to the Hospital and were treated 
for cancer. These were the first definitelv recorded cases. The 



annual report shows that one was discharged as "relieved;" 
the other as "cured." 

During the next two decades about thirty more cases passed 
through the Hospital's doors, and then Dr. A. H. Stevens, 
feeling that his experience warranted it, wrote a short paper 
in an attempt to characterize two species of the disease. 

In 1813 Dr. Stevens successfully removed a fungus tumor 
of the upper jaw. The early detailed account of that type of 
operation was written in Dr. Stevens' own hand and toward 
the end he observed that, "the patient, now, nearly seven 
years from the operation, enjoys perfect health." 

But cases of apparent complete recovery like that were 
more the exception than the rule in those days. There were 
many dark moments. When it was concluded that the disease 
was not local, one doctor wrote that, "it offered a strong 
inducement to the surgeon to limit his views to the smooth- 
ing of the avenues to the grave, from which he can neither 
free nor respite his unhappy patient." 

The Beginning of a New Era 

Nevertheless the fight to conquer cancer went on. The 
time came when Dr. Wm. H. Draper peered through a micro- 
scope at cancer cells and decided to make drawings of them. 
These drawings appear to be among the earliest of their kind 
existent in this country today. They were made in 1856 
when Dr. Thaddius M. Halsted was attending surgeon. 

During its entire existence the New York Hospital has 
taken part in, and has been keenly aware of the steps in the 
progress of cancer control. Its present plant which covers 
three city blocks along the East River between 68th and 71st 
Streets, was planned and constructed in an attempt to include 
the most modern and scientific equipment for the treatment 
of disease. 

In many hospitals a separate department of cancer is main- 
tained and a few are entirely devoted to the treatment of can- 
cer. In the New York Hospital it, however, seems more 



desirable to divide the work according to the types of treat- 
ment of all diseases including cancer. 

In the Hospital all of the modern devices for diagnosis are 
maintained and the Central Laboratories contribute what- 
ever laboratoryfindingsmayassist the physicians. The interne- 
resident system not only assures the patient adequate exam- 
ination and care but also trains doctors. 

Department of Medicine 

In the Department of Medicine the activities are largely con- 
centrated on diagnosis rather than treatment. Many of the 
early signs and symptoms of cancer may be due to other non- 
cancerous diseases and it is necessary to investigate thorough- 
ly and study any given case before surgical removal or x-ray 
treatment is recommended. This department in cooperation 
with other departments and outside agencies has given special 
attention to cancer of the lung. A direct view of the earliest 
types of internal cancers can be obtained by what is termed 
"endoscopic" examination, which is really the use of an in- 
verted periscope with a light on the end of it. 

Department of Surgery 

The New York Hospital has today continued w T ith vigor the 
surgical attack upon cancer. In the past two and a half years 
2.50 cancers have been removed with encouraging results in 
the early cases. 

More important, perhaps, is the attack upon lesions in the 
body that are known to be cancer forming. By removal of 
these non-malignant growths, undoubtedly many are saved 
from suffering the dire results of the disease. The operation 
is usually simple, not dangerous, and can be done adequately 
with very little loss of time to the patient. 

Special operating instruments are used in removing a can- 
cer, such as electric coagulators and the cauterv, which tend 
to prevent the spread of the disease bv handling. 



Woman's Clinic 

The work on cancer in the Woman's Clinic or Lying-in Hos- 
pital is divided into three classes: prevention, treatment, and 
follow-up. 

All Mothers who have their babies in the Hospital are 
carefully examined ten days after delivery, and again six 
weeks after delivery. In this way cancer, if it exists, is caught 
at a very early stage. 

The combination of radium, deep x-ray therapy and sur- 
gery places the woman's clinic of the New York Hospital in 
a position to deal with all forms of malignancy peculiar to 
woman. 

The Woman's Clinic has a very excellent staff of social 
service workers who have perfected a thorough follow-up 
system. This is exceedingly important for the proper care of 
patients having cancerous lesions, not only from the point of 
view of giving the patient prolonged, adequate supervision 
and treatment, but also for the purpose of accumulating valu- 
able, correct statistical information. 

X-Ray Department 

In all parts of the Hospital there are available thirty-two 
x-ray machines. The X-Ray Department has two condensor 
type x-ray machines which make it possible to get more exact 
photographs at a greater distance and gives far less distortion. 

Most of the machines are for diagnostic use although in 
1934, 1,646 x-ray treatmets were given for cancer. 



The dark picture of the early part of the Nineteenth Cen- 
tury has been greatly brightened as a result of painstaking 
research and study. Today it may be said that there is seldom 
a cancer that cannot be removed successfully if it is recog- 
nized in the early stages and the proper medical and surgical 
treatment is given. 



■ 



THE 

NEW YORK HOSPITAL 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

1932-1933 



VOLUME I NUMBER II 



THE 

NEW YORK HOSPITAL 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Associated with Cornell University 




Announcement 



*93 2 • 1933 



Volume i 



Number ii 



CALENDAR 



1932 

qP 1 . . . Matriculation and Registration 

October 3 First Trimester begins — Classes 

convene. 

November 24-27 . . Thanksgiving Recess (First year 

students only). 

December 24-26 . . Christmas Recess (First year stu- 
dents only). 

1933 

January 21 .... First Trimester ends — Registration. 

January 23 ... . Second Trimester begins — Classes 

convene. 

February 22 . . . . Washington's Birthday — A holiday. 

May 13 Second Trimester ends — Registration. 

May 15 Third Trimester begins — Classes 

convene. 

May 30 Memorial Day — A holiday. 

September 30 . . . Third Trimester ends. 

Four weeks' vacation within the 
third trimester. 

September 29 and 30 Matriculation and Registration. 

October 2 First Trimester begins — Classes 

convene. 



HISTORY AND GENERAL 
STATEMENT 

THE New York Hospital, the second oldest hospital in 
America, received its charter of incorporation under 
George the Third of England on the 13th day of June, 1771, 
under the title of Society of New York Hospital in the City 
of New York in America. Subsequently by an Act of the 
Legislature in 18 10 the title was changed to The Society of 
The New York Hospital. 

Although only a stone's throw from the present site of 
the Brooklyn Bridge, the building known as the New York 
Hospital was then erected so far out of town that it was con- 
sidered at too great a distance from the activities of the 
city. This institution added new buildings and continued 
its usefulness to the community until 1870, when it was 
deemed advisable to find a new location. The property 
known as the Thorne Mansion was purchased, on the south 
side of Sixteenth Street, between Fifth and Sixth Avenues, 
and extending through to Fifteenth Street. In 1877 tne 
buildings were completed, some of which have been occupied 
up to the present time. 

Shortly after the opening of the hospital at its new site 
it was determined to establish a School of Nursing, the first 
class of which was admitted in 1877. Since then more than 
1,200 students have been graduated, many of whom are 
to be found in important positions of administration and 
teaching in schools of nursing and in public health organ- 
izations as well as in the field of private nursing. 

In June, 1927, the New York Hospital formed an asso- 
ciation with the Cornell University Medical College, known 
as the New York Hospital-Cornell Medical College Asso- 

[5] 



ciation. The resources of each institution were increased and 
an extensive program of building was begun. 

The new plant, situated on York Avenue between Sixty- 
eighth and Seventy-first Streets, will be opened September, 
1932, and will offer unusual opportunities and facilities for 
the progressive development of the School of Nursing. The 
hospital, with a potential capacity of one thousand beds, 
will care for all types of acutely ill patients, including medi- 
cal, surgical, obstetrical, gynecological, pediatric and psy- 
chiatric, and the out-patient department will provide ample 
opportunity for the study of ambulatory patients. 

A special building for the School of Nursing has been 
erected adjacent to the hospital buildings. It provides ade- 
quate and well-equipped classrooms, laboratories, library 
and recreation rooms, as well as attractive and comfortable 
living accommodations for the students and faculty. 

Further necessary laboratory and library facilities are 
available through the use of these facilities of the Cornell 
University Medical College. 

As has previously been arranged, affiliations for the teach- 
ing of public health nursing, communicable diseases and 
psychiatric nursing will be continued with the Henry Street 
Visiting Nurse Service, the Willard Parker Hospital, and 
Bloomingdale Hospital, respectively. 

The School of Nursing is registered with the Regents of 
New York State which permits its graduates to take the State 
Board examinations in order to secure state registration. 

The Curriculum 

The three-year curriculum of the School of Nursing is so 
planned as to give each student a thorough understanding 
of the basic sciences and principles underlying good nursing 

[6] 



and of the best methods to use in the care of the sick, in the 
prevention of disease, and in health education. 

Each of the three school years is divided into trimesters of 
sixteen weeks each. Classes are admitted to the school each 
autumn. To carry out the program of study, each student 
shares proportionately in the nursing services of the hos- 
pital, out-patient department, and affiliating organizations. 

During the first two, the pre-clinical trimesters, limited 
practice is assigned in the wards of the hospital and the 
clinics of the out-patient department, while a greater amount 
of time is spent in class and laboratory. In the subsequent 
seven trimesters, the students' nursing practice increases in 
length of time and in responsibility and a sequence is planned 
to include the various types of clinical services during day, 
evening and night periods in order that the students may 
acquire complete understanding of patients' needs. 

For a conscientious study of her patients the schedule of 
each student will include lecture, laboratory, clinic, or class 
periods, relative to the subject, which, with the assigned 
nursing practice, will approximate forty-four hours per 
week. Personal and group conferences and case studies will 
be required of all students. 

Accrediting by Cornell University 

To those students who may later matriculate at the New 
York State College of Home Economics, Cornell University, 
if they present all other necessary requirements, the cur- 
riculum of the New York Hospital School of Nursing will 
be credited to the amount of 45 to 60 hours, which is equiva- 
lent to one and a half to two academic years of college credit 
toward the Bachelor of Science degree. 

Requirements for Admission 

Applicants for admission to the School of Nursing must 
present credentials of graduation from an accredited high 

[7] 



school or other recognized preparatory school with fifteen 
units of study as follows: 

English 3 units 

History i " 

Mathematics 2 

(Algebra, 1 unit; Plane Geometry, 1 unit) 

Science 2 

(Preferably Chemistry and Physics) 

Foreign Language 4 

Electives 3 



n 



a 



tt 



Total 15 units 

Applicants who have had college study will be given 
preference in admission to the school. 

Besides these scholastic admission requirements, students 
should be at least 20 and not over 30 years of age and must 
present evidence of physical and personal fitness for nursing. 

Applications for admission should be addressed to the 
Director of the School of Nursing, New York Hospital, 
York Avenue at Seventieth Street, New York, N. Y., and 
should be filed as soon as possible for admission to the 
school in the fall of 1932. 

A personal conference of the student and her parent or 
guardian with the Director of the School of Nursing is 
desirable and should be arranged at the time of application 
or soon thereafter, if possible. An appointment for an inter- 
view can be made upon request. 

Advanced Standing 

Advanced standing may be granted those students who 
present credentials showing satisfactory completion of 

[8] 



courses of study taken in colleges or other schools of nursing 
deemed of similar and equal value to those given in the 
New York Hospital School of Nursing. 

Requirements of Scholarship and for Graduation 

Students will be graded in their studies as follows: A — 
excellent; B — good; C — average; D — pass; E — conditioned; 
F — failure. 

A grade of C or better must be acquired in at least two- 
thirds of the credit hours taken in each year. No credit will 
be given for a course graded E unless a passing mark is 
secured through the repetition of the course or by exami- 
nation determined upon the judgment of the Committee 
on Promotions. Courses marked F — failure, will require 
repetition. 

Upon the recommendation of the Faculty of the School 
of Nursing the Diploma in Nursing will be granted by the 
Board of Governors of the Society of the New York Hospital 
to those students who have satisfactorily completed the 
prescribed curriculum in nursing. 

The Faculty of the School of Nursing reserves the right 
to recommend to the Council of the School of Nursing the 
withdrawal of any student because of continuous poor 
scholarship, ill health or misconduct. 

Health Regulations and Service 

The School of Nursing maintains a health service for its 
students. A well-equipped infirmary and necessary staff are 
provided in the nurses' building. For illnesses requiring 
constant attention students will be cared for in the hospital 
gratuitously tor a limited time. 

A physical examination by the school physician is re- 

[9] 



quired upon admission to the school and subsequent annual 
physical examinations will be held. 

Vaccinations against typhoid fever and smallpox will be 
requested of all students before admission to the School. 
Schick and Dick tests will be given during the preclinical 
period. To all students having positive Schick tests im- 
munization will be required. 

Vacations and Other Absences 

Two vacations of four weeks each are given during the 
first and second years and one of two weeks in the third 
year. These vacations are arranged by the School of Nursing 
to conform to the requirements of the educational program 
and the fields in which clinical practice is obtained. 

Except for first-year students during their first and second 
trimesters, holidays are observed only in connection with 
class schedules. As a result of absences the repetition of a 
course of study or special examinations may be required; 
class registration may be changed and in most instances 
nursing practice will have to be made up. 

Fees 

Matriculation Fee $ 10.00 

Payable at first registration; not refunded. 

Laboratory Fee 10.00 

Payable at first registration; not refunded. 

Tuition Fees for First and Second Trimesters ioo.oo 
$50.00 payable at registration each Trimester; 
not refunded after second week for any cause of 
withdrawal. 

Health Service Fees for First and Second 

Trimesters First Year 10.00 

$5.00 payable at registration each Trimester; 
not refunded. 

[10I 



Student Activities Fees — Annually, $5.00 . . $15.00 
Payable in two installments First and Second 
Trimesters each year; not refunded. 

Graduation Fee 10.00 

Payable at registration Third Trimester, Third 
Year; refunded if student is not graduated. 

Total Fees for Three Years $155.00 

Chemistry laboratory breakage fee of $15.00 to be de- 
posited at beginning of First Trimester, First Year. Amount 
not used for breakage to be refunded. 

All fees should be paid by check, money order or draft 
drawn to the order of the New York Hospital. 

Maintenance and General Expenses 

Room, board and limited laundry will be provided each 
student upon her admission to the school. Uniforms also 
will be provided each student, but in case of withdrawal of 
the student from the school, will remain the property of the 
school. Text books and miscellaneous expenses, largely 
determined by personal requirements, must be paid for by 
each student; these may be estimated to be approximately 
$25.00 per year. As regular physical exercises will be required 
of each student, the necessary regulation suit must be pro- 
vided by the student. 

Social and Extra-Curricular Opportunities 

Believing that the education of young women today must 
include activities relating to healthful social relationships, 
the Board of Governors has made generous provision for 
this development in the student life of the school. 

The beautiful new fireproof, sixteen-story residence, 

in] 



erected adjacent to the hospital buildings, will be the center 
for these activities. Every effort has been made in its con- 
struction to provide for the normal and healthy life of 
students and faculty. 

Each of the eight student residence floors contains attrac- 
tively furnished single bedrooms with lavatories for each 
student, ample common baths, showers and toilet facilities, a 
common sitting-room with adjoining kitchenette for informal 
gatherings and a laundryette. 

Comfortable lounges, reading, reception and dining rooms 
are on the first and ground floors. 

For further recreational activities, a large well equipped 
gymnasium, billiard-room, game room and porches are 
available. 

To insure the full benefit and proper use of these facilities 
well qualified instructors have been appointed to direct 
the social and extra-curricular activities of the school. 



12] 



THE CURRICULUM 

As the courses of study are now being reorganized the data 
relative to their content, sequence and length may be altered. 



FIRST YEAR 

First Trimester 

Nursing Practice Lecture and 

Hours Laboratory Hours 

Orientation Course ... 8 

History of Nursing ... 32 

Chemistry 96 

Anatomy ... 72 

Psychology ... 32 

Elementary Nursing 192 48 

Personal Hygiene ... 8 

Nursing Ethics ... 24 

Total 192 320 

Required Physical Education, four hours each week. 

Second Trimester 

Physiology ... 72 

Bacteriology and Pathology .... ... 72 

Social and Economic Aspects of 

Health and Disease ... 32 

Nutrition and Cookery 48 

Elementary Nursing 288 72 

Elementary Materia Medica .... ... 16 

Total 288 312 

Required Physical Education, four hours each week. 

[13] 



Third Trimester 

*Dietotherapy 180 48 

Materia Medica ... 32 

Medical Diseases ... 32 

*Medical Nursing 400 16 

Surgical Diseases 32 

Total 580 160 

*Note — In this trimester half the class will take Surgical 
Nursing (See First Trimester, Second Year) instead of Medical 
Nursing. Those so doing will postpone 90 hours of Dietotherapy 
practice until the next trimester. 



SECOND YEAR 

First Trimester 

Nursing Practice 
Hours 

Surgical Nursing 490 

Operating Room Technique .... 176 

Elements of Public Health 

Development of Behavior of Children 

Total 666 72 

Second and Third Trimesters 

Pediatrics ... 32 

Pediatric Nursing 600 16 

Tuberculosis Nursing 60 8 

Obstetrics and Gynecology ... 48 

Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing 600 24 
Principles of Public Health Nursing 

and Health Teaching ... 32 



Lecture and 


Laboratory Hours 


16 


8 


16 


32 



Total 1,260 160 

[14] 



THIRD YEAR 

First Trimester 

Nursing Practice Lecture and 

Hours Laboratory Hours 

Psychology of Deviate Behavior . . ... 32 

Psychiatry ... 32 

Psychiatric Nursing 520 32 

Special Therapeutics 80 

Total 600 96 



Second Trimester 

Communicable Diseases ... 32 

Communicable Disease Nursing . . . 500 24 

Medical Diseases and Practice ... 160 16 

Total 660 72 

Third Trimester 

Community Nursing 640 48 

Modern Social and Health Movements ... 32 

Professional Problems ... 16 

Total 640 96 

Total Hours First Year 1,060 792 

Total Hours Second Year 1,926 232 

Total Hours Third Year 1,900 264 

Total 4,886 1,288 



J 5 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

Anatomy 

A general understanding of the gross and microscopic structure 
of the normal human body. Lectures, recitations, demonstrations 
and dissection of gross specimens. 

72 Hours, First Trimester, First Year. 

Bacteriology and Pathology 

A study of the habits and morphology of micro-organisms 
emphasizing those of pathogenic character; sources, modes and 
prevention of infection; disinfection and asepsis; degenerative 
and regenerative changes in body tissues due to infection, new 
growths, trauma and other causes. Practical demonstrations and 
applications will be made which relate directly to nursing. Schick 
and Dick tests will be given each student. Lectures, recitations 
and laboratory. 

72 Hours, Second Trimester, First Year. 

Chemistry 

The fundamental principles of inorganic and organic chemistry 
with special application to those changes which are commonly 
met in nursing, and especially for a better understanding of 
physiological reactions, drug reactions and disinfection. Lectures, 
recitations and laboratory. 

96 Hours, First Trimester, First Year. 

Medicine 

1. Medical Diseases 

A general consideration of medical diseases with emphasis upon 
their etiology, pathology, symptomology, treatment and pre- 
vention. Lectures and clinics. 

32 Hours, Third Trimester, First Year. 

2. a. Principles of Medical Nursing. 

Through classes, demonstrations and conferences, students are 
taught the principles and methods in the nursing care of medical 
patients. 

16 Hours, Third Trimester, First Year 
or First Trimester, Second Year. 

[16] 



2. b. Principles of Medical Nursing. 

An advanced course for senior students, emphasizing the care 
of metabolic patients. Lectures, recitation and clinics. 

1 6 Hours, Second Trimester, Third Year. 

3. a. Practice of Medical Nursing. 

The application of the principles of nursing patients through 
supervised practice in the wards and out-patient department of 
the hospital. Case studies and conferences. 

400 Hours, Third Trimester, First Year, 
or First Trimester, Second Year. 

3. b. Practice of Medical Nursing. 

An advanced practice period in the care of medical patients. 
Conferences and case studies. 

160 Hours, Second Trimester, Third Year. 

4. Communicable Diseases. 

A study of communicable diseases with special emphasis upon 
their etiology, mode of transmission, prevention, complications 
and treatment. Lectures and clinics. 

32 Hours, Second Trimester, Third Year. 

4. a. Principles of Communicable Disease Nursing. 

Through classes, demonstrations and conferences, students are 
taught both the care of patients suffering from or exposed to 
communicable diseases and protective measures against infection. 

24 Hours, Second Trimester, Third Year. 

4. b. Practice of Communicable Disease Nursing. 

Applying by means of supervised practice, case studies and 
conferences, the principles of nursing patients with communicable 
diseases. 

500 Hours, Second Trimester, Third Year. 

5. Tuberculosis Nursing. 

A course designed to give the student an understanding of the 
prevalence, etiology, pathology and prevention of the disease and 
the care of tuberculous patients. Practice, recitations, clinics and 
demonstrations. 

68 Hours, Second or Third Trimesters, Second Year. 

[17] 



Nursing 
i. Orientation Course. 

This course is designed to give the beginning student a general 
conception of the field of nursing; the responsibilities and obli- 
gations of each individual in choosing the profession; the import- 
ance of general conduct in building up the right habits of living 
and attitudes of the nurse. Lectures and recitations. 

8 Hours, First Trimester, First Year. 

2. a. Elementary Nursing Principles. 

A course designed to give the student a basic understanding of 
the principles of nursing, with emphasis upon her attitude toward 
her patient, the existing social relationships, the physical require- 
ments for the proper care of patients, and the procedures found 
most helpful in their care. 

48 Hours, First Trimester, First Year. 

2. b. Principles of Nursing. 

A continuation of Nursing 2a with emphasis upon more compli- 
cated nursing procedures. 

72 Hours, Second Trimester, First Year. 

3. a. and 3. b. Elementary Nursing Practice. 

The application of the theories of nursing in laboratory practice 
and in the actual care of convalescent patients in the wards and 
out-patient department of the hospital. 

192 Hours, First Trimester, First Year. 
288 Hours, Second Trimester, First Year. 

4. History of Nursing. 

A survey of the historical development of nursing from its early 
conception to modern times. Lectures and recitations. 

32 Hours, First Trimester, First Year. 

5. Nursing Ethics. 

A general consideration of fundamental ethical and philo- 
sophical principles and their application to problems which arise 
in the practice of nursing. An attempt will be made to co-ordinate 
this course closely with each course of nursing practice through 
class discussions of pertinent problems. 

24 Hours, First Trimester, First Year, or throughout 
First and Second Trimesters, First Year. 

[18] 



6. Professional Problems. 

Through a general survey of the nursing field, the student has 
an opportunity to learn the trends and advances in the profes- 
sion; the need and opportunities for specialized preparation; the 
importance and types of legislation; the activities of professional 
organizations and the obligations of their members. Lectures and 
recitations. 

1 6 Hours, Third Trimester, Third Year. 

See description of other courses in nursing relating to specific 
clinical fields. 

Nutrition 
i. Nutrition and Cookery. 

An elementary course in normal human nutrition with emphasis 
upon the preparation and service of simple foods for the sick. 
Lectures, recitations, laboratory. 

48 Hours, Second Trimester, First Year. 

2. Dietotherapy. 

A course designed to present the underlying principles in the 
treatment of disease by means of special dietaries. Lectures, 
recitations, laboratory. 

48 Hours, Third Trimester, First Year. 

3. Practice of Dietotherapy. 

The application of the principles of dietotherapy in supervised 
practice in the laboratory, diet kitchens, wards and clinics of the 
hospital. 

180 Hours, Third Trimester, First Year, 
or First Trimester, Second Year. 

Obstetrics and Gynecology 

1. Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

This course deals with physiological and pathological changes 
during pregnancy, labor and the puerperium; the social signifi- 
cance of maternal and infant mortality; the relation of obstetrics 
to various gynecological conditions; the results of infection and 
tumor growth and the required surgical interference and operative 
treatment. Lectures and clinics. 

48 Hours, Second and Third Trimesters, Second Year. 

[19] 



2. Principles of Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing. 

This course emphasizes the importance of prenatal observation 
and care; obstetrical and gynecological nursing procedure with 
particular attention to infections and their special therapy. 
Classes and demonstrations. 

24 Hours, Second and Third Trimesters, Second Year. 

3. Practice of Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing. 

Under supervised practice in the wards, operating rooms, labor 
and delivery rooms, and out-patient department, students have 
the opportunity to observe and care for obstetrical and gyneco- 
logical patients. Case studies and conferences. 

600 Hours, Second and Third Trimesters, Second Year. 

Pediatrics 

1. Pediatrics. 

This course deals with the diseases of infancy and childhood, 
with emphasis on infant welfare, prevention of morbidity and 
mortality and dietotherapy. Lectures and clinics. 

32 Hours, Second and Third Trimesters, Second Year. 

2. Principles of Pediatric Nursing. 

The basic principles in the nursing care of infants and children, 
with emphasis on the social and educational aspects of their 
treatment and behavior. Classes and demonstrations. 

16 Hours, Second and Third Trimesters, Second Year. 

3. Practice of Pediatric Nursing. 

Under supervised practice in the wards, out-patient department 
and the formula room, students will have the opportunity to 
observe and care for infants and children, to carry out aseptic 
nursing procedures, and to study infant and child nutrition. Case 
studies and conferences. 

600 Hours, Second and Third Trimesters, Second Year. 

4. Development of Behavior of Children. 

A study of the normal child and his behavior. The susceptibility 
of the child's behavior responses to the various details of family 
life and of school will be emphasized. Lectures, recitations and 
clinics. 

32 Hours, First Trimester, Second Year. 

[20] 



Personal Hygiene and Public Health 

i. Personal Hygiene. 

An elementary course emphasizing the importance of physical 
and mental health, especially as it relates to the life of the nurse 
and is reflected in her work. Class discussions. 

8 Hours, First Trimester, First Year. 

2. Physical Education. 

Each student will be required to participate in regular physical 
exercise designed primarily to maintain positive health with 
emphasis upon posture and corrective measures and to stimulate 
sportsmanship. 

128 Hours, First and Second Trimesters, First Year. 
Time to be arranged for succeeding Trimesters. 

3. Social and Economic Aspects of Health and Disease. 

A course of study designed to give a true understanding of 
the social and economic factors which promote or retard health. 
Emphasis will be placed on individual and national character- 
istics to be found in patients, and the effects of environment 
upon the maintenance or restoration of health. Lectures and 
recitations. 

32 Hours, Second Trimester, First Year. 

4. Elements of Public Health. 

This course is planned to give the student an introduction to 
modern public health activities. Class discussions and excursions. 

16 Hours, First Trimester, Second Year. 

5. Principles of Public Health Nursing and Health Teaching. 
The problems of health and disease as they affect the family, 

the principles involved in their application to the care of patients 
in their homes, and the teaching of health to patients and their 
families are considered in this course. Lectures and recitations. 
32 Hours, Second or Third Trimesters, Second Year. 

6. Modern Social and Health Movements. 

An historical study of the progress of social and health work 
with consideration of the close relationship of health and welfare 

[21] 



agencies and of the responsibility and participation of the nursing 
profession. Lectures and discussion. 

32 Hours, Third Trimester, Third Year. 

7. Generalized Community Nursing (Principles and Practice). 

Supervised nursing practice in homes with emphasis upon 
health teaching and the relationships of various official and non- 
official social and health agencies. Practice, conferences, demon- 
strations. 

688 Hours, Third Semester, Third Year. 

Pharmacology 

1. Elementary Materia Medica. 

A course designed to acquaint the student with the fundamental 
weights, measures, terms and symbols used in the preparation 
and administration of drugs, common antiseptics, disinfectants 
and other solutions. Laboratory and class discussion. 

16 Hours, Second Trimester, First Year. 

2. Materia Medica. 

A study of important and commonly used drugs; their prepa- 
ration, dosage, administration, physiological and therapeutic 
actions, idiosyncrasies, cumulative and toxic effects, antidotes 
and emergency treatments. Emphasis is placed on the accurate 
administration of drugs and their effects, through supervised 
practice in nursing courses. Recitations and laboratory. 

32 Hours, Third Trimester, First Year. 

Physiology 

This course is designed to give a basic understanding of the 
functions of the normal human body as an essential pre- 
requisite to the study of health and nutrition and the pathological 
changes due to disease. Lectures, recitations, laboratory, demon- 
strations. 

72 Hours, Second Trimester, First Year. 

Psychiatry 
1. Psychiatry. 
A course of study designed to acquaint students with psycho- 

[aa] 



pathic conditions, their prevalence, social aspects, etiology, path- 
ology, prevention and treatment. Lectures and clinics. 

32 Hours, First Trimester, Third Year. 

2. Principles of Psychiatric Nursing. 

This course is organized to give students an understanding of 
the basic principles in the nursing care of psychopathic patients 
and the nursing procedure used in their treatment. Emphasis is 
placed also upon the relation of mental illness to physical illness, 
and the effects of child behavior on future adult life. Recitations, 
demonstrations, conferences and clinics. 

32 Hours, First Trimester, Third Year. 

3. Practice of Psychiatric Nursing. 

The application of the principles of psychiatric nursing through 
supervised practice in the care of children and adults in the hos- 
pital and out-patient department. Case studies required. 

520 Hours, Third Year. 

4. Special Therapeutics. 

This study gives the student an understanding of the use of 
hydrotherapy, occupational and recreational therapies in the 
care of mentally ill patients. Conferences and practice. 

80 Hours, First Trimester, Third Year. 

Psychology 

1. Elementary Psychology. 

An introduction to the study of human behavior and the under- 
lying principles of mental adjustments and habit formation. 
An effort will be made to apply this study to the adjustment of 
the student to her own personality as it effects her professional 
life, and to the better understanding of the adjustment of patients 
to their illnesses. Recitations and lectures. 

32 Hours, First Trimester, First Year. 

2. Psychology of Deviate Behavior. 

A study of the deviations from usual behavior in adults and 
children to an understanding of such adjustments patients may 
profitably make to their illnesses. Lectures, recitations and clinics. 

32 Hours, First Trimester, Third Year. 

[23] 



Surgery 
i. Surgical Diseases. 

A consideration of pathological conditions which require surgi- 
cal treatment including those relating to eye, ear, nose and throat; 
urology and orthopedics. Emphasis will be placed upon symptoms, 
diagnosis, complications and sequelae of surgical conditions. 
Lectures and clinics. 

32 Hours, Third Trimester, First Year. 

2. Principles of Surgical Nursing. 

Through classes, demonstrations and conferences students 
learn the principles of surgical nursing, with emphasis upon aseptic 
procedures, and preoperative and postoperative care of patients. 

16 Hours, Third Trimester, First Year, 
or First Trimester, Second Year. 

3. Practice of Surgical Nursing. 

The application of surgical nursing principles through super- 
vised practice in the care of preoperative and postoperative 
patients and emergency conditions. Case studies and conferences. 

490 Hours, Third Trimester, First Year, 
or First Trimester, Second Year. 

4. Operating Room Technique and Practice. 

This course is designed to give thorough preparation and to 
develop skill in surgical aseptic techniques; to observe symptoms 
and to assist in the treatments of patients under anaesthetics and 
in shock. Classes and supervised practice. 

184 Hours, First Trimester, Second Year. 



24] 



The Society of the New York Hospital 

Governors 

Edward W. Sheldon President 

Wilson M. Powell Vice-President 

Bronson Winthrop Treasurer 

Henry W. DeForest Cornelius N. Bliss Walter Jennings 

Howard Townsend Paul Tuckerman Joseph H. Choate, Jr. 

George F. Baker William Woodward Frank L. Polk 

Augustine J. Smith Arthur Iselin Frederic W. Allen 

Charles S. Brown G. Beekman Hoppin John Hay Whitney 

Frank K. Sturgis Lewis Cass Ledyard, Jr. William Vincent Astor 

Henry G. Barbey R. Horace Gallatin Barklie McKee Henry 

G. Howard Wise, Secretary 
United States Trust Company of New York 

Assistant Treasurer 



New York Hospital-Cornell Medical 
College Association 

(not incorporated) 

Joint Administrative Board 

Edward W. Sheldon, Chairman 

Frank L. Polk Livingston Farrand Walter L. Niles, M.D. 

William Woodward J. DuPratt White J. Pierpont Morgan 

G. Canby Robinson, M.D., Director 



Council of the School of Nursing 

Edward W. Sheldon, Chairman 

Wilson M. Powell Flora Rose Mary M. Roberts 

G. Canby Robinson Mary Beard Anna D. Wolf 

Livingston Farrand Eugene F. DuBois John R. Howard, Jr, 



Alumnae Committe of the School of Nursing 

Mary Beard, Chairman Annie W. Goodrich, Vice-Chairman 

Lydia E. Anderson Minnie H. Jordan Anna L. Reutinger 

Irene H. Sutliffe, Honorary Member Lillian D. Wald 

[ 25 ] 



OFFICERS OF 
ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY 

Anna D. Wolf, MA., R.N. 

Director of the School of Nursing 
and Director of the Nursing Service 

B.A. Goucher College, 191 1; Diploma in Nursing, The Johns 
Hopkins Hospital School for Nurses, 191 5; M.A. Teachers Col- 
lege, Columbia University, 1916; Robb Fellow, Teachers College, 
Columbia University, 1925-1926; Instructor and Assistant Super- 
intendent of Nurses, The Johns Hopkins Hospital School for 
Nurses, 1916-1919; Instructor of Nursing, Vassar Training Camp 
for Nurses, Summer 191 8; Superintendent of Nurses, Peking 
Union Medical College, Peking, China, 19 19-1924; Dean of the 
School of Nursing, ibid., 1 924-1925; Associate Professor of Nurs- 
ing and Superintendent of Nurses, The University Clinics, The 
University of Chicago, 1 926-1929; Associate Professor of Nursing 
and Director of Nursing, ibid., 1929-1931; Director of the School 
of Nursing and Director of the Nursing Service, New York 
Hospital, 193 1-. 



Irene H. Sutliffe, R.N. 

Directress Emeritus, School of 
Nursing 

Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 
1880; Organized Harmot Hospital, Erie, Pennsylvania; Organized 
School for Nurses, Long Island College Hospital, Brooklyn; 
Directress of Nurses, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 
1 886-1902; Charge of Nursing Service, Camp Black, during 
Spanish- American War; Organized Infantile Paralysis Emer- 
gency Hospital, New York, 1916; Directress Emeritus, New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; Member of the Society 
of the New York Hospital; Honorary Member of the Alumnae 
Committee of the New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-. 



* Other appointments now under consideration. 

[26] 



S. Margaret Gillam, M.A. 

Director, Department of Nutrition 

Teacher's Diploma, Home Economics, Mechanics Institute, 
Rochester, New York, 1916; B.S. Teachers College, Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1922; M.A., ibid., 1923; Dietitian, Rochester General 
Hospital, 1918-1919; Superintendent, Woman's Industrial Home, 
Medical Lake, Washington, 1919-1921; Director, Dietetics and 
Housekeeping, University of Michigan Hospital, 1923-1932; 
Instructor, Nutrition, Department of Public Health and Hygiene, 
University of Michigan, 1925-1932; Instructor in Nutrition, Ex- 
tension Division, ibid., 1930; Director, Department of Nutrition, 
New York Hospital, 1932-. 



Vf.rda F. Hickcox, B.S., R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing; 
Head of Obstetrical and Gynecological 
Nursing Instruction and Service. 

Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School for Nurses, 
Chicago, 1916; Certificate of Public Health, Chicago School of 
Civics and Philanthropy, 1919; B.S. Teachers College, Columbia 
University, 1927; Midwifery Course, General Lying-in Hospital 
and School of Midwifery, London, England, 1928; District School 
Teacher, 1910-1912; Chief Nurse, Longfellow Mining and Acci- 
dent Hospital, Morenci, Arizona, 1916-1918; General Staff Nurse, 
U. S. Army Base Hospital No. 13, France, 1918-1919; Psychiatric 
Social Worker, Psychiatric Hospital, Dunning, Illinois, 1920; 
Community Nurse, American Red Cross, Morenci, Arizona, 
1920-1922; Private Duty, 1922-1924; General Staff Nurse, Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin Hospital, 1924-1925; Private Duty, 1925- 
1926; Educational Director, Visiting Nurse Association, York, 
Pennsylvania, 1927-1928; Instructor and Assistant to Director, 
Brooklyn Maternity Center Association, 1928; Instructor of 
Midwifery and Supervisor of Obstetrical and Gynecological 
Departments, Siriraj Hospital, Bangkok, Siam, 1929-1931; 
Consultant Nurse, Maternity, Infancy and Child Hygiene, New 
York State Department of Health, 1931-1932; Assistant Director, 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 193 2-; Head of Obstetrical 
and Gynecological Nursing Instruction and Service, New York 
Hospital, 1932-. 

[29] 



Mary T. McDermott, M.A. 

Director, Nurses' Residence; 
Instructor, Physical Education 

Diploma, Bouve Boston School of Physical Education, 1916; 
Special Courses: Harvard University, 191 7, 1919, 1931; People's 
College, Denmark, 1926; B.S. New York University, 1930; 
M.A. New York University, 1932; Supervisor, Physical Educa- 
tion, Third Supervisory District, Greene County, N. Y., 
1915-1918; Supervisor, Physical Education, City Schools, Fitch- 
burg, Massachusetts, 1918-1919; Supervisor of Playground, 
Concord, Massachusetts, 19 19; Supervisor, Physical Education, 
City Schools, Revere, Massachusetts, 1919-1921; Supervisor of 
Playground, Brookline, Massachusetts, 1921; Director, Recrea- 
tion and Physical Education, Stockbridge, Massachusetts, 1921- 
1922; Director, Recreation, City of New Haven, 1922-1924; 
Director, Physical Education and Health, State Normal School, 
Fitchburg, Massachusetts, 1 924-1929; Director, Physical Educa- 
tion, Dalton Experimental School, New York, 1930-1931; Assis- 
tant Director, Student Activities, New York University, 193 1- 
1932; Instructor, Physical Education, New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, 1932-; Director, Nurses' Residence, ibid., 1932-. 



Alice Maude Moffatt, R.N. 

Head of Private Patients' Nursing Service 

Bishop Bethune College, Toronto, Canada, 1904-1906; Diploma 
in Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 191 2; Private 
Duty, 1912-1915; General Staff Nurse, Hopital Militaire V. R. 
76, France, 1915-1916; Supervisor, Private Patients' Building, 
New York Hospital, 1917-1932; Head of Private Patients' 
Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1932-. 

Sarah E. Moore, R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing; 
Administrative Assistant, Day Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 19 13; 
Part-time Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, and 
New York University, 1914, 1926, 1927, 1928; Teacher, Public 

[30] 



Schools, 1903-1908; Head Nurse, New York Hospital, 1913-1918; 
Instructor, Practical Nursing, New York Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1918-1922; Assistant Directress of Nurses, ibid., 1923- 
1932; Acting Directress of Nurses, ibid., 1932; Administrative 
Assistant, Day Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1932-. 



Bessie A. R. Parker, R.N. 

Administrative Assistant, Evening Nursing 
Service 

Graduate Provincial Normal School, Fredericton, N. B., Canada, 
1905; Diploma in Nursing, Rhode Island Hospital Training School 
for Nurses, Providence, 191 8; Teacher, Public Schools, 1905- 
191 5; Assistant Superintendent of Nurses and Instructor, Nursing 
Practice, Rhode Island Hospital Training School for Nurses, 
1918-1920; Assistant Superintendent of Nurses and Instructor, 
Nursing Practice, Bridgeport General Hospital School of Nursing, 
1920-1921; Assistant Superintendent of Nurses and Instructor, 
Nursing Practice, Methodist Episcopal Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing, Brooklyn, 1921-1926; Superintendent of Nurses, ibid., 1926- 
1932; Administrative Assistant, Evening Nursing Service, New 
York Hospital, 1932-. 



Agnes Schubert, M.S., R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing; 
Head of Pediatric Nursing Instruction 
and Service 

B.S. Northwestern University, 19 17; Diploma in Nursing, West- 
ern Reserve University School of Nursing, 1926; M.S. Teachers 
College, Columbia University, 1932; Supervisor, Babies' and Chil- 
dren's Hospital, Western Reserve University, 1926-1927; Assis- 
tant Instructor and Supervisor, ibid., 1927-1928; Assistant Direc- 
tor, ibid., 1 928-1930; Supervisor and Instructor, Bobs Roberts 
Hospital, The University of Chicago Clinics, 1930-1931; Assistant 
Director, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; Head of 
Pediatric Nursing Instruction and Service, New York Hospital, 
1932-. 

[31] 



Gertrude L. Tomlinson, R.N. 

Administrative Assistant, Night Nursing 
Service 

Graduate State Normal School, Mansfield, Pennsylvania, 1905; 
Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1920; 
Public School Teacher, 1905-1917; Directress of Nurses, Bloss- 
burg Hospital, Blossburg, Pennsylvania, 1921-1922; Private Duty, 
1922-1930; Night Supervisor, New York Hospital, 1930-1932; 
Administrative Assistant, Night Nursing Service, New York 
Hospital, 1 932-. 



3 2 J 



INSTRUCTORS AND SUPERVISORS* 

Esther Marie Anderson, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Medical Out- 
Patient Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, University of Minnesota School of Nursing, 
1922; Post-graduate Course, Public Health Nursing, University 
of Minnesota, 1922; Student, University of Minnesota, Summer 
1932; General Staff Nurse, Infant Welfare Society of Minne- 
apolis, 1922; Supervisor, Infant Welfare, and Assistant to Direc- 
tor, Waterbury Visiting Nurse Association, Waterbury, Connect- 
icut, 1922-1924; Night Superintendent, University of Minnesota 
Hospital, 1 924-1925; General Staff Nurse, Assistant Supervisor, 
and Supervisor, Henry Street Settlement Visiting Nurse Associa- 
tion, 1925-1928; Clinic Executive, Medical Department, Cornell 
Clinic, New York, 1 928-1932; Instructor, Medical Nursing, 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; Supervisor, Medical 
Out-Patient Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1932-. 

Gertrude Victoria Boquist, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Pediatric 
Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Lutheran Hospital School of Nursing 
Moline, Illinois, 1926; Student, Teachers College, Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1928-1929 and 1931-1932; General Staff Nurse, Obstet- 
rical Service, Research and Educational Hospital, Chicago, 1927; 
General Staff Nurse, Albert Merritt Billings Hospital, The Uni- 
versity of Chicago Clinics, 1927-1928; Head Nurse, Pediatric 
Service, Bellevue Hospital, Summer and Fall, 1929; Supervisor, 
Children's Memorial Hospital, Chicago, 1929-1931; Instructor, 
Pediatric Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; 
Supervisor, Pediatric Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1932-. 

Elsie Gertrude Davies, R.N. 

Supervisor, Student and Staff Health 

Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 
1910; Head Nurse, Surgical Ward, New York Hospital, 1910- 

*Arranged alphabetically. 

I33I 



1920; Night Supervisor, ibid., 1 921-1924; Supervisor of Clinics, 
Flushing Hospital, New York, 1 927-1928; Supervisor, Out-Pa- 
tient Department, New York Hospital, 1928-1932; Supervisor, 
Student and Staff Health, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 
1932-. 

Margaret DeWitt, R.N. 

Assistant Supervisor, General 
Operating Rooms 

Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 
1925; Night Suture Nurse, New York Hospital, 1 926-1927; Camp 
Nurse, Summer of 1927; Suture Nurse, Hackensack Hospital, 
1927; Suture Nurse, New York Hospital, 1927-1930; Supervisor, 
Public Operating Room, ibid., 1 930-1932; Assistant Supervisor, 
General Operating Rooms, New York Hospital, 1932-. 



Mrs. Mary A. Fabre, R.N. 

Assistant Night Supervisor, Medical 
and Surgical Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1904; 
Private Duty, 1904-1907; Head Nurse, Surgical Ward, Jamaica 
Hospital, 1 907-1908; Medical Supervisor, Boys' Camp, Summers 
1925, 1926; Private Duty, 1 926-1930; Assistant Night Supervisor, 
Grassland's Hospital, Valhalla, New York, 1930-1931; Assistant 
Night Supervisor, New York Hospital, 1931-1932; Assistant Night 
Supervisor, Medical and Surgical Nursing Service, New York 
Hospital, 1 932-. 



Caroline Elliot Falls, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Psychiatric 
Out-Patient Nursing Service 

Dipolma in Nursing, The Johns Hopkins Hospital School for 
Nurses, 1925; Post-graduate Course, Henry Phipps Psychiatric 
Clinic, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 1925; Part-time Student, Teach- 
ers College, Columbia University, 1929-1932; Student, ibid., 1932; 
Relief Day and Night Supervisor, Henry Phipps Psychiatric 
Clinic, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Summers, 1926, 1927; Psychiatric 

[34] 



Private Duty, 1926 and 1927; Supervisor, Neurological Clinic, 
Bellevue Hospital, 1927; Relief Supervisor, Training School 
Office, and Instructor, Practical Nursing, The Johns Hopkins 
Hospital School for Nurses, 1 927-1928; Head Nurse, Group 
Nursing, Private Floor, Henry Phipps Psychiatric Clinic, Johns 
Hopkins Hospital, 1928-1929; General Staff Nurse, Association 
for Improving Condition of the Poor, New York, 1929-1932; 
Instructor, Psychiatric Nursing, New York Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1932-; Supervisor, Psychiatric Out-Patient Nursing 
Service, New York Hospital, 1932-. 



Alice Marcella Fay, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Psychiatric 
Pediatric Service 

Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 
1923; B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1930; Post- 
graduate Course, Pediatrics, Yale University School of Nursing, 
1924-1925; Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, 
1932; Night Suture Nurse, New York Hospital, 1923; Supervisor, 
Pediatric Service, ibid., 1 923-1924; General Staff Nurse, East 
Harlem Nursing and Health Service, 1925-1928; Social Worker, 
Babies' Hospital, Columbia University Medical Center, 1928- 
1929; Instructor, Communicable Disease Nursing, New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1 929-1930; Part-time Field Nurse, 
Maternity Center Association, 1930; Research Assistant, Study 
of Infant Behavior, Clinic of Child Development, Yale Univer- 
sity, 1930-1931; Resident Nurse, Progressive School, Euthenics 
Institute, Vassar College, Summer 1931 ; Instructor, Psychiatric 
Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 193 2-; Supervisor, 
Psychiatric Children's Service, New York Hospital, 1932-. 



Violet Eleanor Hayden, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Urological Nursing 
Service 

Truro Normal School, Truro, Nova Scotia, Canada, 1924; Di- 
ploma in Nursing, Pasadena Hospital, 1925; Cystoscopic Nurse, 
Urological Service, New York Hospital, 1926-1930; Instructor, 

[35] 



Urological Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; 
Supervisor, Urological Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 
1930-. 

Cora E. Kay, R.N. 

Evening Supervisor, Medical and Surgical 
Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, St. Luke's Hospital School of Nursing, Chi- 
cago, 1 921; Student, University of Minnesota, and Teachers 
College, Columbia University, 1924, 1927, 1929; Instructor, 
Practical Nursing, and Supervisor of Wards, Allegheny Gen- 
eral Hospital, Pittsburgh, 1921-1923; Assistant Superintendent 
of Nurses, St. Luke's Hospital School of Nursing, St. Louis, 1925- 
1926; Instructor, Practical Nursing, St. Luke's Hospital School 
of Nursing, Chicago, 1 926-1927; Superintendent of Nurses, 
Chicago Memorial Hospital, 1927- 1928; Instructor, Practical 
Nursing, and Second Assistant to Superintendent of Nurses, 
Clifton Springs Sanatarium and Clinic, 1 929-1932; Evening 
Supervisor, Medical and Surgical Nursing Service, New York 
Hospital, 1 932-. 

Caroline Keller, B.A., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Surgical 
Nursing Service 

B.A. Smith College, 1921; Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian 
Hospital School of Nursing, New York, 1929; Instructor, Miss 
Day's School, New Haven, 1921-1924; Instructor, The Holman 
School, Philadelphia, 1924-1925; Head Nurse, Surgical Ward, 
New Haven Hospital, 1 929-1930; Assistant Supervisor, Surgical 
Nursing, New Haven Hospital, 1930- 193 2; Instructor, Surgical 
Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; Super- 
visor, Surgical Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1932-. 

Elizabeth Moser, B.A., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Surgical Nursing 
Service 

B.A. Bluffton College, Bluffton, Ohio, 1921; Diploma in Nursing, 
The Johns Hopkins Hospital School for Nurses, 1926; Staff Nurse, 

[36] 



McCash Infirmary, Princeton University, 1927-1929 and 1930- 
1931; Staff Nurse, Anglo-American Nursing Home, Rome, Italy, 
1929-1930; Instructor, Practical Nursing, Palmerton Hospital, 
Palmerton, Pennsylvania, 1931-1932; Instructor, Surgical Nurs- 
ing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; Supervisor, 
Surgical Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1932-. 

Elizabeth W. Rogers, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Pediatric Out- 
Patient Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 
Chicago, 1924; Full-time and Part-time Student, The University 
of Chicago, 1925-1932; School Nurse, Daytona Beach Public 
Schools, 1 926-1928; General Staff Nurse and Head Nurse, Max 
Epstein Clinics and Pediatric Out-Patient Department, The 
University of Chicago Clinics, 1929-1932; Instructor, Pediatric 
Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; Supervisor, 
Pediatric Out-Patient Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1932-. 

H. Margaret Rogers, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, General 
Operating Rooms 

Diploma in Nursing, The Johns Hopkins Hospital School for 
Nurses, 1923; Private Duty, 1923-1925; Relief Supervisor, Gyne- 
cological Operating Room, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Summer 
1925; Supervisor, Children's Ward, YVaterbury Hospital, 1925- 
1926; Assistant Night Supervisor, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Sum- 
mer 1926; Assistant Operating Room Supervisor, ibid., 1926-1929; 
Supervisor, Operating Room, Garfield Memorial Hospital, Wash- 
ington, 1929-1932; Instructor, Operating Room Technique, New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; Supervisor, General Oper- 
ating Rooms, New York Hospital, 1932-. 

Theressa Sanman, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Medical Nursing 
Service 

Student, Peru Normal School, Nebraska, Summer 191 8; Student, 
University of Nebraska, Summer 1920; Diploma in Nursing, 

[37] 



New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1925; Student, Teachers 
College, Columbia University, 1 927-1928; Part-time Student, 
ibid., 1930-1932; Teacher, Public Schools, 1917-1920; Private Duty 
1 925-1928; Teaching Supervisor, Medical and Surgical Service, 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1929-1931; Instructor, 
Medical Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; 
Supervisor, Medical Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1932-. 

Katherine Weiser, M.A., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, 

Surgical Out-Patient Nursing Service 

B.A. Smith College, 1917; Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian 
Hospital School of Nursing, New York, 1920; M.A. Teachers 
College, Columbia University, 1931; Reconstruction Work, 
France, 1920-1921; Assistant Supervisor, Visiting Nurse Associa- 
tion, Chicago, 1923-1924; General Staff Nurse and Supervisor, 
Pediatrics, Yale University School of Nursing, 1924-1926; Super- 
visor, Dispensary, Holyoke Hospital, 1 927-1930; Instructor, 
Surgical Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; 
Supervisor, Surgical Out-Patient Nursing Service, New York 
Hospital, 1 932-. 

Margaret Wyatt, B.A., R.N. 

Instructor, Nursing Principles and Practice 

B.A. Meredith College, 1923; Diploma in Nursing, New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1927; Student, Teachers College, 
Columbia University, Summers 1931, 1932; Instructor and Assis- 
tant to the Dean of Women, Meredith College, 1923-1924; Head 
Nurse, Surgical Ward, New York Hospital, 1927-1930; Instructor, 
Nursing Principles and Practice, New York Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1930-. 



38] 






ASSISTANT INSTRUCTORS AND 
HEAD NURSES* 

Anne Marie Anderson, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Women's Medical Ward 

Estella May Arthur, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Women's Surgical Ward 

Vera Beach, R.N. 

Head Nurse, Private Patients' Floor 

Mabel Louise Bichy, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Obstetrical Ward 

Mildred Elizabeth Colville, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Women's Surgical Ward 

Helen M. Daum, B.S., R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Men's Medical Ward 

Helen Eilola, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Obstetrical and Gynecological Isolation 
W T ard 

Helen Scammell Foley, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Isolation Ward 

Rosina Haubner, R.N. 

Assistant Head Nurse, 
Urological Ward 

Elizabeth Viola Kribs, R.N. 

Head Nurse, Private Patients' Floor 

*Arranged alphabetically. 

[39] 



Veronica Lyons, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Obstetrical and Gynecological Ward 

Lucy Jane MacDonald, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Accident Ward 

Kathleen Mills, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Men's Surgical Ward 

Marguerite Plow, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Men's Surgical Ward 

Myrna Evelyn Wight, R.N. 

Head Nurse, Private Patients' Floor 



ASSISTANTS IN ADMINISTRATION 



Flora Josephine Bergstrom, R.N. 
Dorothy Jacobus, B.A., R.N. 
Mrs. Edith A. Stephenson 



Librarian 

Secretary-Registrar 

Secretary 



[40 






CORNELL UNIVERSITY MEDICAL COLLEGE 
FACULTY PARTICIPATING IN INSTRUCTION* 

Charles R. Stockard, M.D. 

Professor of Anatomy 

Philip B. Armstrong, M.D. 

Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

William J. Elser, M.D. 

Professor of Bacteriology and Immunology 

George W. Wheeler, M.D. 

Assistant Professor of Bacteriology 

Ralph G. Stillman, M.D. 

Assistant Professor of Clinical Pathology 

Stanley R. Benedict, M.D. 

Professor of Chemistry 

Gladys J. Fashena, M.A. 

Assistant in Chemistry 

Eugene F. DuBois, M.D., and Staff 

Professor of Medicine 

Henricus J. Stander, M.D., and Staff 

Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Oscar M. Schloss, M.D., and Staff 

Professor of Pediatrics 

George S. Amsden, M.D., and Staff 

Professor of Psychiatry 

Herbert Spencer Gasser, M.D. 

Professor of Physiology 

George S. Heuer, M.D., And Staff 

Professor of Surgery 

*Arranged alphabetically according to Department. 



MEMBERS OF AFFILIATING ORGANIZATIONS 

Mrs. Lorna Doone Mitchell, R.N. 

Superintendent of Nurses 

Willard Parker Hospital 

Eloise A. Shields, B.S., R.N. 

Director of Nursing 

Bloomingdale Hospital for Mental Diseases 

Margaret A. Wales, M.A., R.N. 
General Director of Nursing 

Visiting Nurse Service, Henry Street Settlement 



42] 



THE SOCIETY OF THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 



THE 

NEW YORK HOSPITAL 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

1933-1934 



VOLUME II NUMBER I 



THE SOCIETY OF THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 

THE 

NEW YORK HOSPITAL 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Associated with Cornell University 




Announcement 



x 933 ' 1934 



Volume ii 



Number i 



CALENDAR 



T 933 

September 26 
October 2 . . . 
November 7 . . 
November 30-) 
December 3 j 
December 23-25 

J 934 

January 1 . 
January 20 
January 22 
February 22 
May 12 . . 
May 14 . . 
May 30 . . 
July 4 . . 
September 29 



September 25 
October 1 . 



Matriculation and Registration 

First Trimester begins — Classes convene 

Election Day — A holiday 

Thanksgiving Recess (First year students 

only) 
Christmas Recess (First year students 

only) 

New Year's Day — A holiday 
First Trimester ends — Registration 
Second Trimester begins — Classes convene 
Washington's Birthday — A holiday 
Second Trimester ends — Registration 
Third Trimester begins — Classes convene 
Memorial Day — A holiday 
Independence Day — A holiday 
Third Trimester ends 

Four weeks' vacation within the third 
trimester 
Matriculation and Registration 
First Trimester begins — Classes convene 



1935 

January 19 
January 21 
May 11 . . 
May 13 . . 
September 28 
September 24 



First Trimester ends 
Second Trimester begins 
Second Trimester ends 
Third Trimester begins 
Third Trimester ends 
Matriculation and Registration 



HISTORY AND GENERAL 
STATEMENT 

THE New York Hospital, the second oldest hospital in 
America, received its charter of incorporation under 
George the Third of England on the 13th day of June, 1771, 
under the title of the Society of the Hospital in the City of 
New York in America. Subsequently by an Act of the Legis- 
lature in 1 8 10 the title was changed to the Society of The 
New York Hospital. 

Although only a stone's throw from the present site of 
the Brooklyn Bridge, the building known as the New York 
Hospital was then erected so far out of town that it was con- 
sidered at too great a distance from the activities of the 
city. This institution added new buildings and continued 
its usefulness to the community until 1870, when it was 
deemed advisable to find a new location. The property 
known as the Thorne Mansion was purchased, on the south 
side of Sixteenth Street, between Fifth and Sixth Avenues, 
and extending through to Fifteenth Street. In 1877 the 
buildings were completed, some of which have been occupied 
up to 1932. 

The first systematic and scientific training for nurses, 
through lectures and practical instruction on the wards, 
was begun in 1799 under the direction and tutelage of Dr. 
Valentine Seaman and continued throughout his association 
with the hospital until 1817. 

Shortly after the opening of the hospital at its new site 
it was determined to establish a school of nursing, the first 
class of which was admitted in 1877. Since then more than 
twelve hundred students have been graduated many of 
whom are to be found in important positions of administra- 

[5] 



tion and teaching in schools of nursing and in public health 
organizations as well as in the field of private nursing. 

In June, 1927, the New York Hospital formed an asso- 
ciation with the Cornell University Medical College. The 
resources of each institution were increased and an exten- 
sive program of building was begun. 

The new plant, situated on York Avenue between Sixty- 
eighth and Seventy-first Streets, was opened September, 
1932, and offers unusual opportunities and facilities for 
the progressive development of the school of nursing. The 
hospital with a potential capacity of one thousand beds 
cares for all types of acutely ill patients including medi- 
cal, surgical, obstetrical, gynecological, pediatric and psy- 
chiatric, and the out-patient department provides ample 
opportunity for the study of ambulatory patients. 

A special building for the school of nursing is adjacent 
to the hospital buildings. It provides adequate and well- 
equipped classrooms, laboratories, library and recreation 
rooms as well as attractive and comfortable living accom- 
modations for the students and faculty. 

Further necessary laboratory and library facilities are 
available through the association with the Cornell Uni- 
versity Medical College. 

Affiliation is made with the Henry Street Visiting Nurse 
Service for field experience in public health nursing and 
with the Maternity Center Association for field experience 
in obstetrical nursing. 

The Social Service Department of the New York Hospital 
participates in the nursing program by the integration of 
social service throughout the entire course of study. 

The school of nursing is registered with the Regents oi 
New York State which permits its graduates to take the State 
Board examinations in order to secure state registration. 

[6] 



The Curriculum 

The three-year curriculum of the school of nursing is so 
planned as to give each student a thorough understanding 
of the basic sciences and principles underlying good nursing 
and of the best methods to use in the care of the sick, in the 
prevention of disease, and in health education. 

Each of the three school years is divided into trimesters of 
sixteen weeks each. Classes are admitted to the school each 
autumn. To carry out the program of study, each student 
shares proportionately in the nursing services of the hos- 
pital, out-patient department, and affiliating organizations. 

During the first two, or pre-clinical trimesters, limited 
practice is assigned in the pavilions of the hospital and the 
clinics of the out-patient department while a greater amount 
of time is spent in class and laboratory. In the subsequent 
seven trimesters the students' nursing practice increases in 
length of time and in responsibility and a sequence is planned 
to include the various types of clinical services during day, 
evening and night periods in order that the students may 
acquire complete understanding of patients' needs. 

For a conscientious study of her patients the schedule of 
each student will include lecture, laboratory, clinic, or class 
periods relative to the subject which with the assigned 
nursing practice will approximate forty-eight hours per 
week. Personal and group conferences and case studies will 
be required of all students. 

Accrediting by Cornell University 

To those students who may later matriculate at the New 
York State College of Home Economics, Cornell University, 
if they present all other necessary requirements, the cur- 
riculum of the New York Hospital School of Nursing will 
be credited to the amount of forty-five to sixty hours, which 
is equivalent to one and a half to two academic years of 
college credit, toward the Bachelor of Science degree. 

[7] 



Requirements for Admission 

Applicants for admission to the school of nursing must 
present credentials of graduation from an accredited high 
school or other recognized preparatory school and have 
satisfactorily completed two years of college, or its equiva- 
lent, which has included a course in introductory chemistry. 
Exceptions to these matriculation requirements may be 
made only by offering substitutions satisfactory to the Com- 
mittee on Admissions. It is advised that sudents have intro- 
ductory zoology and biology as preparation for the course 
in nursing. 

Besides these scholastic admission requirements students 
should be at least twenty and not over thirty years of age 
and must present evidence of physical and personal fitness 
for nursing. All applications for admission should be ad- 
dressed to the Director of the School of Nursing, 525 East 
Sixty-eighth Street, New York, New York. 

A personal conference of the student and her parent or 
guardian with the Director of the School of Nursing is de- 
sirable and should be arranged at the time of application or 
soon thereafter if possible. An appointment for an interview 
will be made upon request. 

Registration and Orientation Week 

First-year students must register at the school by three 
o'clock on Tuesday afternoon, September twenty-sixth. 
During this period, until classes convene on Monday, 
October second, students take required psychological tests, 
have necessary physical examinations, Schick and Dick tests, 
confer with faculty advisors and secure uniforms, books and 
other equipment. A program of orientation and recreation 
is followed so that the student becomes acquainted with her 
new surroundings and has the opportunity of organizing 
her methods of study and work before the period of instruc- 
tion begins. 



Advanced Standing 

Advanced standing may be granted those students who 
present credentials showing satisfactory completion of 
courses of study taken in other schools deemed of similar 
or equal value to those given in the New York Hospital 
School of Nursing. 

Requirements of Scholarship and for Graduation 
Students will be graded in their studies on a basis of 
weighted quality points with an average of two quality 
points required for promotion and graduation. 

The following grading system has been established: 

A — Excellent 4 quality points 

B — Good 3 quality points 

C — Average 2 quality points 

D — Pass 1 quality point 

F — Failure -1 quality point 

I — Incomplete . given in cases of absence and 

not because of poor scholarship 
Failure in any given subject may necessitate withdrawal 
from the school unless the student's scholarship is excep- 
tional in other respects in which case repetition of the course 
may be recommended by the instructor. 

Health Regulations and Service 
The school of nursing maintains a health service for its 
students. A well-equipped infirmary and necessary staff are 
provided in the nurses' residence. For illnesses requiring 
constant attention students will be cared for in the hospital 
gratuitously for a limited time. 

A physical examination by the school physician is re- 
quired upon admission to the school and subsequent annual 
physical examinations will be held. 

[9] 



Vaccinations against typhoid fever and smallpox will be 
requested of all students before admission to the School. 
Schick and Dick tests will be given during the preclinical 
period. To all students having positive Schick tests im- 
munization will be required. 

Vacations and Other Absences 

Two vacations of four weeks each are given during the 
first and second years and one of two weeks in the third 
year. These vacations are arranged by the school of nursing 
to conform to the requirements of the educational program 
and the fields in which clinical practice is obtained. 

Except for first-year students during their first and second 
trimesters holidays are observed only in connection with 
class schedules. As a result of absences the repetition of a 
course of study or special examinations may be required; 
class registration may be changed and in most instances 
nursing practice will have to be made up. 

Fees 

Matriculation Fee $ 10.00 

Payable at first registration; not refunded. 
Laboratory Fee 10.00 

Payable at first registration; not refunded. 
Tuition Fees for First and Second Trimester ioo.oo 

$50.00 payable at registration each trimester; 

not refunded after second week for any cause of 

withdrawal. 
Health Service Fees for First and Second 
Trimesters, First Year 10.00 

$5.00 payable at registration each trimester; 

not refunded. 

[10] 



Chemistry Laboratory Breakage Fee .... $ 5.00 
Payable at first registration. Amount not used 
for breakage to be refunded or excess breakage 
to be paid. 

Graduation Fee 10.00 

Payable at registration, third trimester, third 
year; refunded if student is not graduated. 

Total Fees for Three Years $145.00 

All fees should be paid by check, money order or draft 

drawn to the order of the New York Hospital. 

Maintenance and General Expense 

Room, board and limited laundry are provided each stu- 
dent while she is in the school. Uniforms are furnished each 
student but in the case of withdrawal of a student will re- 
main the property of the school. Text books, educational 
supplies and miscellaneous expenses largely determined by 
personal requirements must be borne by each student; 
these may be estimated to amount to approximately 
seventy-five dollars for the first year, fifty dollars for the 
second and third years. A list of limited necessary personal 
equipment will be sent each prospective student when her 
application is accepted. 

Scholarship Aid and Loan Fund 

Through the generosity of a friend of the school of nursing 
scholarship aid is made available to a limited number of 
students who have proven themselves well fitted for the pro- 
fession, who have high standards of scholarship and who are 
in financial need. A student loan fund has also been estab- 
lished to give necessary financial aid to those students who 
show promise in their chosen field. 

[ill 



Applications for scholarship aid and student loans should 
be made to the Director of the School. 

Social and Extra-Curricular Opportunities 

Believing that the education of young women today must 
include activities relating to healthful social relationships, 
the Board of Governors has made generous provision for 
this development in the student life of the school. 

The beautiful new fireproof, sixteen-story residence, 
erected adjacent to the hospital buildings, is the center 
for these activities. Every effort has been made in its con- 
struction to provide for the normal and healthy life of 
students and faculty. 

Each of the eight student residence floors contains attrac- 
tively furnished single bedrooms with lavatories for each 
student, ample common baths, showers and toilet facilities, a 
common sitting-room with adjoining kitchenette for informal 
gatherings and a laundryette. 

Comfortable lounges, reading, reception and dining-rooms 
are on the first and ground floors. 

For further recreational activities, a large well equipped 
gymnasium, billiard-room, game-room and porches are 
available. By special arrangement the swimming pool of the 
Lenox Hill Neighborhood Association is available for use. 

To insure the full benefit and proper use of these facilities 
well qualified instructors are appointed to direct the social 
and recreational activities of the school. 

School Government 
The school of nursing has a cooperative government in 
which the students take an active part. A student organiza- 
tion has been established and has developed plans for the 
social discipline of its group. 

[12] 



THE CURRICULUM 
FIRST YEAR 

Class and Approximate Credit 

Laboratory Hours Hours 
Hours Practice 

Anatomy 72 ... 3 

Bacteriology and Pathology .... 80 ... 3 

Chemistry 96 ... 4 

Physiology 72 ... 3 

Elementary Materia Medica .... 16 ... 1 

History of Nursing 32 ... 2 

Nursing Ethics 16 ... 1 

Nursing Principles and Practice . . 96 414 8 

Nutrition and Cookery 48 ... 2 

Social and Economic Aspects of Health 

and Disease 32 ... 2 

Dieto-Therapy 48 176 4 

Materia Medica 32 ... 2 

Psychology 32 ... 2 

Medical Diseases 40 ... lyi 

Communicable Diseases 24 ... lyi 

Medical Nursing 16 264 4 

Surgical Diseases 32 ... 2 

Surgical Nursing 16 264 4 



Total 800 1 1 18 5 



13] 



SECOND YEAR 

Class and 
Laboratory- 
Hours 

Nursing Ethics 8 

Medical Nursing 

Surgical Nursing 

Operating Room Technique .... 8 

Development of Behavior of Children 32 

Pediatrics 32 

Pediatric Nursing 34 

Obstetrics and Gynecology .... 45 

Obstetrical and Gynecological Nurs- 
ing 64 

Elements of Public Health 16 

Principles of Public Health Nursing 
and Health Teaching 32 



Approximate 

Hours 

Practice 


Credit 
Hours 




X 


I76 


3 


I76 


3 


35* 


4 




2 




2 


672 


9 




3 


667 


10 




1 



Total 271 2043 39 J/ 2 



14 



THIRD YEAR 

Class and Approximate Credit 

Laboratory Hours Hours 

Hours Practice 

Psychology of Deviate Behavior . . 32 ... 2 

Psychiatry 32 ... 2 

Psychiatric Nursing 32 546 9 

Special Therapeutics 126 2^ 

Surgical Nursing 16 270 4 

Medical Nursing 16 270 4 

Communicable Disease Nursing . . 16 180 3 

Community Nursing 768 8 

Modern Social and Health Move- 
ments 32 ... 2 

Professional Problems 16 ... 1 

Nursing Ethics 8 ... }4 

Total 200 2160 38 

First Year Total Hours 800 11 18 51 

Second Year Total Hours 271 2 °43 39^ 

Third Year Total Hours 200 2160 38 

Grand Total 1271 5321 128^2 



Students of a given class are divided into three sections during 
the second and third years. They are assigned to one of the three 
sequences of clinical practice for a consecutive period of sixteen 
weeks each. 

Physical Education, four hours each week, is required for first- 
year students; two hours each week for second and third year 
students from October i-May 31. 

[15] 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

Anatomy 

This course includes both gross and microscopical anatomy. 
The gross anatomy is taught by lectures, demonstrations and 
student dissection of the cadaver. The microscopical work is 
directly correlated with the gross dissection and includes lectures, 
demonstrations and a detailed study of prepared slides by the 
students. Significant embryological information is included in 
the lectures. 

72 Hours, First Year 
Dr. Armstrong 

Bacteriology and Pathology 
The study of the habits and morphology of microorganisms 
emphasizing those of pathogenic character; sources, modes and 
prevention of infection; disinfection and asepsis; the more impor- 
tant tissue changes occurring in the healing process, infections 
and neoplasms; clinical microscopy of the blood and blood group- 
ing; kidney function and urinalysis. Practical demonstrations and 
applications will be made which will relate directly to nursing. 
The blood group of each student will be ascertained and recorded. 
Lectures, recitations and laboratory. 

80 Hours, First Year 

Dr. Elser, Dr. Wheeler and Dr. Stillman 

Chemistry 
A course designed to acquaint students with the fundamental 
principles of inorganic and physiological chemistry with special 
application to nursing practice. Studies in the general composition 
of the blood and urine, and in the digestion and utilization of 
foods are included. Lectures, recitations and laboratory. 

96 Hours, First Year 
Miss Fashena 
Medicine 
1. Medical Diseases 

A general consideration of medical diseases with emphasis upon 
their etiology, pathology, symptomology, treatment and preven- 
tion. Lectures and clinics. 

40 Hours, First Year 
Dr. Du Bois and staff 

[16] 



2. Principles of Medical Nursing 

Through classes, demonstrations and conferences students are 
taught the principles and methods in the nursing care of medical 
patients. 

1 6 Hours, First Year or Second Year 

1 6 Hours, Third Year 

Miss Amberson and Miss Sanman 

3. Practice of Medical Nursing 

The application of the principles of nursing patients through 
supervised practice in the pavilions and out-patient department 
of the hospital. Case studies and conferences. 

710 Hours, First Year, Second Year and Third Year 
Miss Amberson, Miss Sanman and staff 

4. Communicable Diseases 

A study of communicable diseases, including tuberculosis, with 
special emphasis upon their etiology, mode of transmission, pre- 
vention, complications and treatment. Lectures and clinics. 

24 Hours, First Year 
Dr. Du Bois and staff 

5. Principles of Communicable Disease Nursing 

Through classes, demonstrations and conferences students are 
taught both the care of patients suffering from or exposed to com- 
municable diseases and protective measures against infection. 

16 Hours, First Year, Second Year or Third Year 

Miss Sanman and Miss Foley 

6. Practice of Communicable Disease Nursing 

Applying by means of supervised practice, case studies and con- 
ferences the principles of nursing patients with communicable 
diseases, including tuberculosis. 

180 Hours, First Year, Second Year or Third Year 

Miss Sanman and Miss Foley 

Nursing 
1. Orientation Course 

This course is designed to give the beginning student a general 
conception of the field of nursing; the responsibilities and obliga- 
tions of each individual in choosing the profession; the importance 

[17] 



of general conduct in building up the right habits of living and 

attitudes of the nurse. Lectures and recitations. 

8 Hours, First Year 
Miss Wolf and Miss Kennedy- 
No credit 

2. Principles of Nursing 

A course designed to give the student a basic understanding of 
the principles of nursing with emphasis upon her attitude toward 
her patient, the existing social relationships, the physical require- 
ments for the proper care of patients and the procedures found 
most helpful in their care. 

96 Hours, First Year 

Miss Wyatt and Miss Huey 

3. Practice of Elementary Nursing 

The application of the theories of nursing in laboratory prac- 
tice and in the actual care of convalescent patients in the pavilions 
and out-patient department of the hospital. 

4 1 4 Hours, First Year 
Miss Wyatt and Miss Huey 

4. History of Nursing 

A survey of the historical development of nursing from its early 
conception to modern times. Lectures and recitations. 

32 Hours, First Year 
Miss Anderson 

5. Nursing Ethics 

A general consideration of fundamental ethical and philosophi- 
cal principles and their application to problems which arise in the 
practice of nursing. An attempt will be made to coordinate this 
course closely with each course of nursing practice through class 
discussions of pertinent problems. 

32 Hours, First Year, Second Year and Third Year 

Miss Wolf 

6. Professional Problems 

Through a general survey of the nursing field, the student has 
an opportunity to learn the trends and advances in the profession; 
the need and opportunities for specialized preparation; the im- 
portance and types of legislation; the activities of professional 

[18I 



organizations and the obligations of their members. Lectures 
and recitations. 

1 6 Hours, Third Year 
Miss Wolf, Miss Kennedy and Miss Frost 
See description of other courses in nursing relating to specific 
clinical fields. 

Nutrition 

i. Nutrition and Cookery 
An elementary course in normal human nutrition with emphasis 

upon the preparation and the utilization of food by the body in 

health. 

48 Hours, First Year 

Miss Gillam and Miss Hague 

2. Dieto-Therapy 

A course designed to present the underlying principles in treat- 
ment of disease by means of special dietaries. Lectures, recita- 
tions and laboratory. 

48 Hours, First Year 

Miss Gillam and Miss Hague 

3. Practice of Dieto-Therapy 

The application of the principles of dieto-therapy in supervised 
practice on the pavilions in the hospital. Conferences and case 
studies. 

176 Hours, First Year or Second Year 
Miss Davis, Miss Hague and staff 

Obstetrics and Gynecology 
1. Obstetrics and Gynecology 

This course deals with physiological and pathological changes 
during pregnancy, labor, and the puerperium; the care of 
the normal newborn; the nutrition of the mother and baby; 
the prevention of complications; the social significance of infant 
and maternal mortality; the relation of obstetrics to various 
gynecological conditions; the results of infection and tumor 
growth and the required surgical interference and operative 
treatment. Lectures, clinics and conferences. 

45 Hours, Second Year 
Dr. Stander and staff 
Miss Davis 

[19] 



2. Principles of Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing 

This course emphasizes the importance of prenatal instruction, 
observation and care; infant, obstetrical and gynecological nurs- 
ing procedure with particular attention to infections and their 
special therapy. Classes, demonstrations and conferences. 

64 Hours, Second Year 

Miss Hickcox, Miss Jones, Miss Klein, Miss Treiber, 
Miss Boyer, Miss Geuss and staff 

3. Practice of Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing 

Under supervised practice in the pavilions, nurseries, operating 
rooms, labor and delivery rooms, and out-patient department, 
students have the opportunity to observe and care for infants and 
obstetrical and gynecological patients. Case studies and confer- 
ences. 

667 Hours, Second Year 

Miss Hickcox, Miss Jones, Miss Klein, Miss Treiber, 
Miss Boyer, Miss Geuss and staff 

Pediatrics 

1. Pediatrics 

This course deals with normal growth and development and 
the diseases of infancy and childhood, with emphasis on infant 
welfare, prevention of morbidity and mortality and infant nutri- 
tion. Lectures and clinics. 

32 Hours, Second Year 
Dr. Schloss and staff 

2. Principles of Pediatric Nursing 

The basic principles in the care of normal and sick infants and 
children are given an emphasis on the social and educational 
aspects of their treatment and behavior as normal children is 
stressed. Classes and demonstrations. 

34 Hours, Second Year 

Miss Schubert, Miss Rogers, Miss Boquist, Miss Sykes 

3. Practice of Pediatric Nursing 

This consists of supervised experience in aseptic nursing meth- 
ods in the care of infants and children on the pavilions, formula 

[20] 



laboratory, premature nursery and out-patient department. 
Case studies and conferences. 

672 Hours, Second Year 

Miss Schubert, Miss Rogers, Miss Boquist, Miss Sykes, 
Miss Geiger, Miss Nason and staff 

4. Development of Behavior of Children 

A study of the normal child and his behavior. The susceptibility 
of the child's behavior responses to the various details of family 
life and of school will be emphasized. Lectures, recitations and 
clinics. 

32 Hours, Second Year 
Appointment pending 

Personal Hygiene and Public Health 

1. Personal Hygiene 

An elementary course emphasizing the importance of physical 
and mental health especially as it relates to the life of the nurse 
and is reflected in her work. Class discussions. 

4 Hours, First Year 
Miss Frost 
No credit 

2. Physical Education 

Each student will be required to participate in regular physical 
exercise designed primarily to maintain positive health with em- 
phasis upon posture and corrective measures and to stimulate 
sportsmanship. 

128 Hours, First Year 

64 Hours, Second and Third Years 

Miss McDermott and Miss Young 

3. Social and Economic Aspects of Health and Disease 

A course of study given concurrently with the lectures on medi- 
cal diseases emphasizing their social and economic aspects. It 
deals with the prevention of sickness and the promotion of health, 
with consideration of the contributing factors in home and com- 
munity. Lectures, conferences and visits of observation. 

32 Hours, First Year 
Miss Frost 

in] 



4. Elements of Public Health 

This course is planned to give the student an introduction to 
the aims and activities of a public health program. Lectures, dis- 
cussions and visits of observation. 

1 6 Hours, Second Year 

Miss Frost and special lecturers 

5. Principles of Public Health Nursing and Health Teaching 

A course of study designed as preparation for practice in com- 
munity nursing. It considers the development, aims and prin- 
ciples of public health nursing with emphasis upon health teach- 
ing. Lectures and discussions. 

32 Hours, Second Year 
Miss Frost 

6. Modern Social and Health Movements 

A study of the progress of social and health work with con^ 
sideration of the close relationship between health and welfare 
agencies, and of the responsibility and participation of the nursing 
profession. Lectures and discussions. 

32 Hours, Third Year 

Miss Frost and special lecturers 

7. Community Nursing Principles and Practice 

Supervised nursing practice in the out-patient department and 
in the home through affiliation with community agencies; empha- 
sis upon family health supervision and cooperation with the var- 
ious official and non-official health and social organizations; con- 
tact with the home also furnished in the out-patient department 
through the social service department and the tuberculosis dis- 
trict. 

768 Hours, Third Year 
Miss Frost, Miss Banfleld, Miss Anderson, 
Miss Weiser, Miss Patterson and staffs 
of social service and affiliating organiza- 
tions 

Pharmacology 

1. Elementary Materia Medica 

A course designed to acquaint the student with the fundamental 
weights, measures, terms and symbols used in the preparation 

[22] 



and administration of drugs, common antiseptics, disinfectants 
and other solutions. Laboratory and class discussion. 

1 6 Hours, First Year 
Miss Daum 
2. Materia Medica 

A study of important and commonly used drugs; their prepara- 
tion, dosage, administration, physiological and therapeutic ac- 
tions, idiosyncracies, cumulative and toxic effects, antidotes and 
emergency treatments. Emphasis is placed on the accurate ad- 
ministration of drugs and their effects, through supervised prac- 
tice in nursing courses. Recitations and laboratory. 

32 Hours, First Year 
Miss Fashena 

Physiology 

This course is designed to give a basic understanding of the 
functions of the normal human body as an essential prerequisite 
to the study of health and nutrition and the pathological changes 
due to disease. Lectures, recitations, laboratory, demonstrations. 

72 Hours, First Year 
Dr. Chambers 

Psychiatry 

1. Psychiatry 

A course of study designed to acquaint students with psycho- 
pathic conditions, their prevalence, social aspects, etiology, 
pathology, prevention and treatment. Lectures and clinics. 
32 Hours, Third Year 
Dr. Amsden, Dr. Henry, Dr. Tiebout and staff 

2. Principles of Psychiatric Nursing 

This course is organized to give students an understanding of 
the basic principles in the nursing care of psychopathic patients 
and the nursing procedure used in their treatment. Emphasis is 
placed also upon the relation of mental illness to physical illness 
and the effects of child behavior on future adult life. Recitations, 
demonstrations, conferences and clinics. 

32 Hours, Third Year 

Miss Sprogell, Miss Knox and staff 

[23] 



3. Practice of Psychiatric Nursing 

The application of the principles of psychiatric nursing through 
supervised practice in the care of children and adults in the hospi- 
tal and out-patient department. Behavior studies required. 

546 Hours, Third Year 

Miss Knox, Miss Wharton, Miss Gudelsky and staff 

4. Special Therapeutics 

This study gives the student an understanding of the use of 
hydrotherapy and occupational and recreational therapies in the 
care of mentally ill patients. Conferences and practice. 

126 Hours, Third Year 

Miss Gunderson, Miss Hibbler and Mr. Larson 

Psychology 

1. Elementary Psychology 

An introduction to the study of human behavior and the under- 
lying principles of mental adjustments and habit formation. 
An effort will be made to apply this study to the adjustment of 
the student to her own personality as it affects her professional 
life, and to the better understanding of the adjustment of patients 
to their illnesses. Recitations and lectures. 

32 Hours, First Year 
Miss Kennedy 

2. Development of Behavior of Children 
(See Pediatrics.) 

3. Psychology of Deviate Behavior 

Consideration of mental hygiene and a study of the deviations 
from usual behavior in adults and children to an understanding 
of such adjustments patients may profitably make to their ill- 
nesses. Lectures, recitations and clinics. 

32 Hours, Third Year 

Surgery 
1. Surgical Diseases 

A consideration of pathological conditions which require surgi- 
cal treatment including those relating to eye, ear, nose and throat, 
urology and orthopedics. Emphasis will be placed upon symptoms, 

[24] 



complications and sequelae of surgical conditions, together with 

their prevention. Lectures and clinics. 

32 Hours, First Year 
Dr. Heuer and staff 

2. Principles of Surgical Nursing 

Through classes, demonstrations and conferences students 
learn the principles of surgical nursing, with emphasis upon 
aseptic procedures, and preoperative and postoperative care of 
patients. 

16 Hours, First Year or Second Year 

16 Hours, Third Year 

Miss Moser, Miss Keller, Miss Willoughby 

3. Practice of Surgical Nursing 

The application of surgical nursing principles through super- 
vised practice in the care of preoperative and postoperative pa- 
tients and emergency conditions. Case studies and conferences. 
710 Hours, First Year, Second Year and Third Year 
Miss Moser, Miss Keller, Miss Willoughby and staff 

4. Operating Room Technique and Practice 

This course is designed to give thorough preparation and to 
develop skill in surgical aseptic technique; to observe symptoms 
and to assist in the treatments of patients under anaesthetics 
and in shock. Classes and supervised practice. Six weeks general 
operating room and two weeks gynecological operating room. 

352 Hours, Second Year 

Miss Rogers, Miss Ackhurst and Miss Weeks 



[25 



The Society of the New York Hospital 

Governors 

Edward W. Sheldon President 

Wilson M. Powell Vice-President 

Bronson Winthrop Treasurer 

Henry W. DeForest Paul Tuckerman Frank L. Polk 

Howard Townsend William Woodward Frederic W. Allen 

Augustine J. Smith Arthur Iselin John Hay Whitney 

Charles S. Brown G. Beekman Hoppin William Vincent Astor 

Frank K. Sturgis Lewis Cass Ledyard, Jr. George F. Baker 

Henry G. Barbey R. Horace Gallatin Barklie McKee Henry 

Cornelius N. Bliss Joseph H. Choate, Jr. Langdon P. Marvin 

G. Howard Wise, Secretary 
United States Trust Company of New York 

Assistant Treasurer 



New York Hospital-Cornell Medical 
College Association 

(not incorporated) 

Joint Administrative Board 

Edward W. Sheldon, Chairman 

Frank L. Polk Livingston Farrand Walter L. Niles, M.D. 

Wilson M. Powell J. DuPratt White J. Pierpont Morgan 

G. Canby Robinson, M.D., Director 



Council of the School of Nursing 

Edward W. Sheldon, Chairman 

Livingston Farrand Mary Beard Eugene F. DuBois 

Wilson M. Powell Mary M. Roberts Barklie McKee Henry 

G. Canby Robinson Flora Rose John R. Howard, Jr. 

Anna D. Wolf 



Alumnae Committee of the School of Nursing 

Mary Beard, Chairman Annie W. Goodrich, Vice-Chairman 

Lydia E. Anderson Minnie H. Jordan Anna L. Reutinger 

Irene H. Sutliffe, Honorary Member Lillian D. Wald 

[26] 



OFFICERS OF 
ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY 

Anna D. Wolf, M.A., R.N. 

Director of the School of Nursing 
and Director of the Nursing Service 

B.A. Goucher College, 191 1 ; Diploma in Nursing, The Johns 
Hopkins Hospital School for Nurses, 191 5; M.A. Teachers Col- 
lege, Columbia University, 19 16; Robb Fellow, Teachers College, 
Columbia University, 1925-1926; Instructor and Assistant Super- 
intendent of Nurses, The Johns Hopkins Hospital School for 
Nurses, 1916-1919; Instructor of Nursing, Vassar Training Camp 
for Nurses, Summer 191 8; Superintendent of Nurses, Peking 
Union Medical College, Peking, China, 1919-1924; Dean of the 
School of Nursing, ibid., 1 924-1925; Associate Professor of Nurs- 
ing and Superintendent of Nurses, The University Clinics, The 
University of Chicago, 1 926-1929; Associate Professor of Nursing 
and Director of Nursing, ibid., 1929-1931; Director of the School 
of Nursing and Director of the Nursing Service, New York 
Hospital, 193 1-. 

Irene H. Sutliffe ^. ^ c , , c 

Directress Emeritus, School of 

Nursing 

Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 
1880; Organized Harmot Hospital, Erie, Pennsylvania; Organized 
School for Nurses, Long Island College Hospital, Brooklyn; 
Directress of Nurses, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 
1 886-1902; Charge of Nursing Service, Camp Black, during 
Spanish-American War; Organized Infantile Paralysis Emer- 
gency Hospital, New York, 191 6; Directress Emeritus, New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; Member of the Society 
of the New York Hospital; Honorary Member of the Alumnae 
Committee of the New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-. 

Lydia E. Anderson, B.A., R.N. c • 1 t tlt- c 

Special Lecturer, History of 

Nursing 

B.A. Rutgers Female College, New York; Diploma in Nursing, 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1897, Part-time Student, 



Teachers College, Columbia University, 1909-1910; Assistant 
Superintendent of Nurses, Sloane Maternity Hospital, 1897- 
1902; Private Duty, 1 902-1903; Assistant Superintendent of 
Nurses, Long Island College Hospital School of Nursing, 1903- 
1904; Assistant Superintendent of Nurses, Mount Sinai Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1904-1908; Private Nursing, 1908- 1909; 
Visiting Teacher, thirty-two hospitals in New York and vicinity, 
1910-; Member, State Board of Nurse Examiners, 19 10- 1927; 
Member, Alumnae Committee, New York Hospital School of 
Nursing, 193 2-; Special Lecturer, History of Nursing, New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-. 

Associate Director, School of Nursing; 

Director, Public Health Nursing 
Diploma in Nursing, St. John's Hospital, Yonkers, 1906; Course 
in Public Health Nursing, Teachers College, Columbia Univer- 
sity, 1 91 5-1 916; Assistant Superintendent and Superintendent of 
Nurses, St. John's Hospital, 1908-1910; Superintendent, Mercer 
Hospital, Trenton, 1913-1915; Director, Department of Instruc- 
tion, Visiting Nurse Society, Philadelphia, 1916-1932; Supervisor, 
Public Health Nursing Department, Pennsylvania School of 
Social and Health Work, 1919-1932; Associate Director, New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; Director, Public Health 
Nursing, ibid., 1932-. 

May Kennedy, M. A., R.N. 

Associate Director, School of Nursing; 

Director of Pedagogy 
Diploma in Nursing, St. Joseph's Hospital, Chicago, 1907; B.S. 
Teachers College, Columbia University, 1917; M.A. University 
of Chicago, 1932; Chief Nurse, Illinois State Hospitals, 1907-1918; 
General Staff Nurse and Chief Nurse, American Expeditionary 
Forces, France, 1918-1919; Superintendent of Nurses, Indian- 
apolis City Hospital, 1919-1920; Director of Nursing and Director 
of Illinois State School of Psychiatric Nursing, Illinois Depart- 
ment of Public Welfare, 1920-1932; Lecturer, University of Chi- 
cago, Summer Quarters, 1928-1931; Director of Institutes, 1922-; 
Lecturer, University of Wisconsin, One Semester, 1931-1932; 
Lecturer, De Paul University, Summer Session, 1929; Associate 
Director, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; Director, 
Pedagogy, ibid., 193 2-. 

[28 1 



ASSISTANT DIRECTORS 
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS AND MEMBERS 
OF OTHER HOSPITAL DEPARTMENTS* 

Katharine G. Ambersox, B.S., R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing; 
Head of Medical and Surgical Nursing 
Instruction and Services 

Diploma in Nursing, The Johns Hopkins Hospital School for 
Nurses, 1919; B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1930; 
Night Supervisor, Harriet Lane Home, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 
1919; Assistant Supervisor, Out-Patient Department, ibid., 
1919-1920; General Staff Nurse, Battle Harbor Hospital, Labra- 
dor, Summers, 1919, 1920; General Staff Nurse, and Head Nurse, 
Rockefeller Institute Hospital, 1920-1923; Superintendent of 
Nurses and Director of Nursing School, Ogden Mills School of 
Nursing, Trudeau Sanatorium, 1 923-1928; Instructor and Execu- 
tive Secretary, Nursing Department, Teachers College, Columbia 
University, 1930-1932; Assistant Director, New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1932-; Head of Medical and Surgical Nursing 
Instruction and Services, New York Hospital, 1932-. 

Gertrude S. Banfield, B.A., R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing; 
Head of Out-Patient Nursing Instruction 
and Service 

B. A. Vassar, 1918; Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital 
School of Nursing, New York, 1920; AssistantHead Nurse, Medical 
Ward, Presbyterian Hospital, New York, 1 920; General Staff Nurse, 
and Head Nurse, Out-Patient Department, Peking Union Medi- 
cal College, Peking, China, 1921-1924; Supervisor, Max Epstein 
Clinics, The University of Chicago Clinics, 1 927-1 931; Assistant 
Director, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 193 2-; Head of 
Out-Patient Nursing Instruction and Service, New York Hospi- 
tal^ 193 2-. 

* Arranged alphabetically. 

[29] 



S. Margaret Gillam, M.A. 

Director, Department of Nutrition 

Teacher's Diploma, Home Economics, Mechanics Institute, 
Rochester, New York, 191 6; B.S. Teachers College, Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1922; M.A., ibid., 1923; Dietitian, Rochester General 
Hospital, 1918-1919; Superintendent, Woman's Industrial Home, 
Medical Lake, Washington, 1919-1921; Director, Dietetics and 
Housekeeping, University of Michigan Hospital, 1923-1932; 
Instructor, Institutional Management, Teachers College, Colum- 
bia University, Summers 1 924- 1 930; Instructor, Nutrition, De- 
partment of Public Health and Hygiene, University of Michigan, 
1925-1932; Instructor in Nutrition, Extension Division, ibid., 
193c; Director, Department of Nutrition, New York Hospital, 
1932-. 

Verda F. Hickcox, B.S., R.N.; C.M.B. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing; 
Head of Obstetrical and Gynecological 
Nursing Instruction and Service. 

Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School for Nurses, 
Chicago, 1 91 6; Certificate of Public Health, Chicago School of 
Civics and Philanthropy, 191 9; B.S. Teachers College, Columbia 
University, 1927; C. M. B., General Lying-in Hospital and 
School of Midwifery, London, England, 1928; Chief Nurse, 
Longfellow Mining and Accident Hospital, Morenci, Arizona, 
1916-1918; General Staff Nurse, U. S. Army Base Hospital 
No. 13, France, 1918-1919; Psychiatric Social Worker, Psychi- 
atric Hospital, Dunning, Illinois, 1920; Community Nurse, 
American Red Cross, Morenci, Arizona, 1920-1922; Private Duty, 
1922-1924; General Staff Nurse, University of Wisconsin Hospi- 
tal, 1 924-1 925; Private Duty, 1 925-1926; Supervisor, Visiting 
Nurse Association, York, Pennsylvania, 1 927-1928; Instructor 
and Assistant to Director, Brooklyn Maternity Center Associa- 
tion, 1928; Instructor of Midwifery and Supervisor of Obstetrical 
and Gynecological Departments, Siriraj Hospital, Bangkok, 
Siam, 1929-1931; Consultant Nurse, Maternity, Infancy and Child 
Hygiene, New York State Department of Health, 193 1 -1932; 
Assistant Director, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; 
Head of Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing Instruction and 
Service, New York Hospital, 193 2-. 

[30] 



Hannah L. Josephi, R.N. 

Director, Social Service 

Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1901; 
Part-time Student, New York School of Philanthropy, 1913; 
Part-time Student, New School for Social Research, 1931 ; 
Supervisor, Private Patient Floor, New York Hospital, 1901- 
1902; Superintendent, House of Holy Comforter, New York, 
1902-1905; Superintendent of Hospital and Director, Nursing 
Service, Mountainside Hospital, 1907-1909; Director, Social Ser- 
vice, New York Hospital, 191 2-. 

Mary T. McDermott, M.A. 

Director, Nurses' Residence; 

Instructor, Physical Education 
Diploma, Bouve Boston School of Physical Education, 1916; 
Special Courses: Harvard University, 1917, 1919, 193 1 ; People's 
College, Denmark, 1926; B.S. New York University, 1930; 
M.A. ibid., 1932; Supervisor, Physical Education, Third Super- 
visory District, Greene County, N. Y., 1915-1918; Supervisor, 
Physical Education, City Schools, Fitchburg, Massachusetts, 
1918-1919; Supervisor of Playground, Concord, Massachusetts, 
1919; Supervisor, Physical Education, City Schools, Revere, 
Massachusetts, 1919-1921; Supervisor of Playground, Brookline, 
Massachusetts, 1921; Director, Recreation and Physical Educa- 
tion, Stockbridge, Massachusetts, 1921-1922; Director, Recrea- 
tion, City of New Haven, 1 922-1924; Director, Physical Educa- 
tion and Health, State Normal School, Fitchburg, Massachusetts, 
1924-1929; Director, Physical Education, Dalton Experimental 
School, New York, 1930-1931; Assistant Director, Student Ac- 
tivities, New York University, 1 931- 193 2; Instructor, Physical 
Education, ibid., Summer 1932; Instructor, Physical Education, 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 193 2-; Director, Nurses' 
Residence, ibid., 193--. 

Alice Maud Moffatt, R.N. 

Head of Private Patients' Nursing Service 

Bishop Bethune College, Oshawa, Canada, 1904-1906; Diploma 
in Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 191 2; Private 
Duty, 1912-1915; General Staff Nurse, Hopital Militaire V. R. 
76, France, 1915-1916; Supervisor, Private Patients' Building, 

[31] 



New York Hospital, 19 17-1932; Head of Private Patients' 
Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1932-. 

Sarah E. Moore, R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing; 
Administrative Assistant, Day Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 19 13; 
Part-time Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, and 
New York University, 1914, 1926, 1927, 1928; Teacher, Public 
Schools, 1903-1908; Head Nurse, New York Hospital, 1913-1918; 
Instructor, Practical Nursing, New York Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1918-1922; Assistant Directress of Nurses, ibid., 1923- 
1932; Acting Directress of Nurses, ibid., 1932; Administrative 
Assistant, Day Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 193 2-. 

Bessie A. R. Parker, R.N. 

Administrative Assistant, Evening Nursing 
Service 

Graduate Provincial Normal School, Fredericton, N. B., Canada, 
1905; Diploma in Nursing, Rhode Island Hospital Training School 
for Nurses, Providence, 191 8; Student, Teachers College, Colum- 
bia University, Part-time, 1 932-1933; Teacher, Public Schools, 
1905-1915; Assistant Superintendent of Nurses and Instructor, 
Nursing Practice, Rhode Island Hospital Training School for 
Nurses, 1918-1920; Assistant Superintendent of Nurses and In- 
structor, Nursing Practice, Bridgeport General Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1920-1921; Assistant Superintendent of Nurses and In- 
structor, Nursing Practice, Methodist Episcopal Hospital School 
of Nursing, Brooklyn, 1921-1926; Superintendent of Nurses, 
ibid., 1926-1932; Administrative Assistant, Evening Nursing Ser- 
vice, New York Hospital, 193 2-. 

Agnes Schubert, M.S., R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing; 
Head of Pediatric Nursing Instruction 
and Service 

B.S. Northwestern University, 19 17; Diploma in Nursing, West- 

[32] 



ern Reserve University School of Nursing, 1926; M.S. Teachers 
College, Columbia University, 1932; Supervisor, Babies' and Chil- 
dren's Hospital, Western Reserve University, 1926-1927; Assis- 
tant Instructor and Supervisor, ibid., 1927-1928; Assistant Direc- 
tor, ibid., 1928-1930; Supervisor and Instructor, Bobs Roberts 
Hospital, The University of Chicago Clinics, 1930-1931; Assistant 
Director, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; Head of 
Pediatric Nursing Instruction and Service, New York Hospital, 
1932-. 



Carolyn A. Sprogell, R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing; 
Director, Psychiatric Nursing 

Diploma in Nursing, St. Lukes Hospital School of Nursing, New 
York, 1924; Post-graduate Course, Psychiatry, Bloomingdale 
Hospital, 1 930; Part-time Student, Teachers College, Columbia 
University, 1 929-1 933; Head Nurse, Southampton Hospital, 
1924; Night Supervisor, ibid., 1925; Private Duty, 1926; Assistant 
Superintendent and Instructor, Practical Nursing, Southampton 
Hospital, 1 927-1 928; Supervisor, St. Lukes Hospital, New York, 
1929; Assistant Director of Nurses, Bloomingdale Hospital, 
1930-1931; Acting Director of Nurses, ibid., 1931-1932; Assistant 
Director, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; Director, 
Psychiatric Nursing, Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic, New 
York Hospital, 193 2-. 



Gertrude L. Tomlinson, R.N. 

Administrative Assistant, Night Nursing 
Service 

Graduate State Normal School, Mansfield, Pennsylvania, 1905; 
Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1920; 
Public School Teacher, 1905-1917; Directress of Nurses, Bloss- 
burg Hospital, Blossburg, Pennsylvania, 1921-1922; Private Duty, 
1922-1930; Night Supervisor, New York Hospital, 1930-1932; 
Administrative Assistant, Night Nursing Service, New York 
Hospital, 1932-. 

[33} 



INSTRUCTORS AND SUPERVISORS* 

Esther Marie Anderson, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Medical Out- 
Patient Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, University of Minnesota School of Nursing, 
1922; Post-graduate Course, Public Health Nursing, University 
of Minnesota, 1922; Student, University of Minnesota, Summer 
1932; General Staff Nurse, Infant Welfare Society of Minne- 
apolis, 1922; Supervisor, Infant Welfare, and Assistant to Direc- 
tor, Waterbury Visiting Nurse Association, Waterbury, Connect- 
icut, 1 922-1924; Night Superintendent, University of Minnesota 
Hospital, 1 924- 1 925; General Staff Nurse, Assistant Supervisor, 
and Supervisor, Henry Street Settlement Visiting Nurse Associa- 
tion, 1925-1928; Clinic Executive, Medical Department, Cornell 
Clinic, New York, 1928-1932; Instructor, Medical Nursing, 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; Supervisor, Medical 
Out-Patient Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1932-. 

Gertrude Victoria Boojjist, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Pediatric 
Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Lutheran Hospital School of Nursing, 
Moline, Illinois, 1926; Student, Teachers College, Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1928-1929 and 1931-1932; General Staff Nurse, Obstet- 
rical Service, Research and Educational Hospital, Chicago, 1927; 
General Staff Nurse, Albert Merritt Billings Hospital, The Uni- 
versity of Chicago Clinics, 1927-1928; Head Nurse, Pediatric 
Service, Bellevue Hospital, Summer and Fall, 1929; Supervisor, 
Children's Memorial Hospital, Chicago, 1929-1931; Instructor, 
Pediatric Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 193 2-; 
Supervisor, Pediatric Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1932-. 

Henrietta P. Bouton, B.A., R.N. 

Instructor, Medical Social 
Service Principles and Practice 

B.A. Wellesley College, 1906; Diploma in Nursing, New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1921; Student, Columbia University 

*Arranged alphabetically. 

[34] 



Extension Courses, 1924, 1931 ; Instructor, Medical Social Ser- 
vice Principles and Practice, New York Hospital Social Service 
Department, 1933-. 

Halcie M. Boyer, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Labor and 
Delivery Rooms 

Part-time Student, Kansas State Teachers College, 1918-1921; 
Part-time Student, The University of Chicago, 1928-1931; 
Diploma in Nursing, Illinois Training School for Nurses, 1928; 
Post-graduate Course, Chicago Lying-In Hospital, 1930; Teacher, 
Kansas Public Schools, 1918-1924; Head Nurse, Woman's Surgi- 
cal Ward, Cook County Hospital, 1928; General Staff Nurse, 
The University of Chicago Clinics, 1928-1931; Supervisor, Ob- 
stetrical Department, and Instructor, Obstetrical Nursing, 
Buffalo Deaconess Hospital, 1931-1932; Instructor, Obstetrical 
Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 193 2-; Supervisor, 
Labor and Delivery Rooms, New York Hospital, 1932-. 

Martha E. Davis, M.A. 

Instructor, Nutrition 

Assistant Director, Department of Nutrition 

State Teachers College, Kirksville, Missouri, 191 9; B.S. Home 
Economics, Oregon State College, 1921; M.S. Home Economics, 
University of Washington, 1929; Graduate Courses in Nutrition, 
Physiology and Physiological Chemistry, University of Chicago, 
1929-1931; Research Fellow, John Sealy Memorial Laboratory 
and School of Medicine, University of Texas, 1931-1932; Teacher, 
Montana Secondary Schools, 1917-1920; Student Dietitian and 
Assistant Dietitian, Cottage Hospital and Potter Metabolic 
Clinic, Santa Barbara, 1922-1924; Dietitian in Charge, Scripps 
Metabolic Clinic, La Jolla, California, 1 924-1927; Instructor, 
Department of Home Economics, University of Washington, 
1 927-1929; Instructor, Nutrition, New York Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1932-; Assistant Director, Department of Nutrition, 
New York Hospital, 1932-. 

Caroline Elliot Falls, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Psychiatric 
Out-Patient Nursing Service 

Dipolma in Nursing, The Johns Hopkins Hospital School for 

[35] 



Nurses, 1925; Post-graduate Course, Henry Phipps Psychiatric 
Clinic, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 1925; Part-time Student, Teach- 
ers College, Columbia University, 1929-1932; Student, ibid., 1932; 
Relief Day and Night Supervisor, Henry Phipps Psychiatric 
Clinic, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Summers, 1926, 1927; Psychiatric 
Private Duty, 1926 and 1927; Supervisor, Neurological Clinic, 
Bellevue Hospital, 1927; Relief Supervisor, Training School 
Office and Instructor, Practical Nursing, The Johns Hopkins 
Hospital School for Nurses, 1927-1928; Head Nurse, Group 
Nursing, Private Floor, Henry Phipps Psychiatric Clinic, Johns 
Hopkins Hospital, 1 928-1929; General Staff Nurse, Association 
for Improving Condition of the Poor, New York, 1 929-1932; 
Instructor, Psychiatric Nursing, New York Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1932-; Supervisor, Psychiatric Out-Pa tient Nursing 
Service, New York Hospital, 1932-. 

Catherine P. Geuss, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor and Assistant Supervisor, 
Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing Service 

Diploma in Teaching, Northeast Missouri Teachers College, 
1924; Diploma in Nursing, Michael Reese Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1928; Diploma, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Woman's 
Hospital, New York, 1929; Student, University of Chicago, 
1930; B.S. and Diploma in Supervision, Teachers College, Co- 
lumbia University, 1932; Teacher, 191 9-1 924; Head Nurse and 
Instructor, Obstetrical Nursing, Michael Reese Hospital, 1929- 
1930; Supervisor, Surgical Wards, ibid., 1 930- 1 931; Instructor, 
Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing, New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1932-; Assistant Supervisor, Obstetrical and 
Gynecological Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1932-. 

Elfletta Elizabeth Geiger, R.N. 

Instructor and Evening Supervisor 
Pediatric Nursing Service 

Student, Illinois Woman's College, 1919-1921; Diploma in Nurs- 
ing, Wesley Memorial Hospital School of Nursing, 1924; Part- 
time Student, University of Chicago, 1926, 1929, 1930; Head 
Nurse, Pediatric Nursing Service, Wesley Memorial Hospital, 
1 925-1927; Supervisor, Northwestern University Medical Clinic, 

[36] 



1 927-1 933; Instructor, Pediatric Nursing, New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1933-; Evening Supervisor, Pediatric Nursing 
Service, New York Hospital, 1933-. 

Anna H. Gudelsky, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Psychiatric 

Nursing 
Diploma in Nursing, The Army School of Nursing, 1923; Student, 
Public Health, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1923- 
1924; Student, Rollins College, 1927; Charge of Out-Patient 
Clinic, Walter Reed Hospital, 1925; Supervisor, Charles T. 
Miller Hospital, 1926; Private Duty, 1927; Operating Room, 
Flower Hospital, 1928; Supervisor, Psychiatric Institute, Colum- 
bia Medical Center, 1 929-1932; Instructor, Psychiatric Nursing, 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; Supervisor, Payne 
Whitney Psychiatric Clinic, New York Hospital, 1932-. 

Virginia Hague, M.S. 

Instructor, Nutrition 
B.S. Ohio State University, 1926; M.S., Teachers College, 
Columbia University, 1930; Dietetic Certificate, Montefiore 
Hospital, 1930; Instructor, Home Economics, Martel High School, 
Martel, Ohio, 1 926-1928; Dietitian, New York Hospital, 1930- 
1932; Instructor of Nutrition, New York Hospital School of 
Nursing, 193 2-. 

Anita M. Jones, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Obstetrical and 
Gynecological Out-Patient Nursing Service 
Student, Ohio Wesleyan University, 1914; Diploma in Nursing, 
Massachusetts General Hospital School of Nursing, 1921; B.S. 
Teachers College, Columbia University, 1929; Public Health 
Nurse, Madison County, Ohio, 1921-1923; Director, Turner 
School of Nursing, Canton, China, 1 923-1928; Assistant Director, 
Maternity Center Association, New York City, 1929-1932; In- 
structor, Obstetrical Nursing, New York Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1932-; Supervisor, Obstetrical and Gynecological Out- 
Patient Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 193 2-. 

[37] 



Cora E. Kay, R.N. 

Instructor and Evening Supervisor, Medical and 
Surgical Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, St. Luke's Hospital School of Nursing, Chi- 
cago, 1921; Student, University of Minnesota, and Teachers 
College, Columbia University, 1924, 1927, 1929; Part-time 
Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1 932-1933; In- 
structor, Practical Nursing, and Supervisor of Wards, Allegheny 
General Hospital, Pittsburgh, 1921-1923; Assistant Superinten- 
dent of Nurses, St. Luke's Hospital School of Nursing, St. Louis, 
1 925-1 926; Instructor, Practical Nursing, St. Luke's Hospital 
School of Nursing, Chicago, 1926-1927; Superintendent of Nurses, 
Chicago Memorial Hospital, 1 927-1928; Instructor, Practical 
Nursing, and Second Assistant to Superintendent of Nurses, 
Clifton Springs Sanatarium and Clinic, 1929-1932; Instructor, 
Medical and Surgical Nursing, New York Hospital School of 
Nursing, 193 2-; Evening Supervisor, Medical and Surgical Nurs- 
ing Service, New York Hospital, 193 2-. 

Caroline Keller, B.A., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Surgical 
Nursing Service 

B.A. Smith College, 1921; Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian 
Hospital School of Nursing, New York, 1929; Instructor, Miss 
Day's School, New Haven, 1921-1924; Instructor, The Holman 
School, Philadelphia, 1 924-1925; Head Nurse, Surgical Ward, 
New Haven Hospital, 1929-1930; Assistant Supervisor, Surgical 
Nursing, New Haven Hospital, 1930-1932; Instructor, Surgical 
Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; Super- 
visor, Surgical Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 193 2-. 

Mary Elizabeth Klein, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Obstetrical 
and Gynecological Nursing Service 
Diploma in Nursing, Hahnemann Hospital School of Nursing, 
1 91 6; Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1928; 
Part-time Student, Cleveland College and School of Nursing, 
Western Reserve University, 1930-1932; Supervisor, Private 
Hospital, Guayaquil, Ecuador, 1917-1918; Private Duty, 1918- 

[38] 



1 921; Supervisor, Private Floors, Hahnemann Hospital, 1921- 
1925; Supervisor, Operating Rooms, ibid., 1925-1928; Head 
Nurse, Maternity Hospital, Western Reserve University, 1929- 
1930; Supervisor and Assistant Instructor, ibid., 1930-1932; 
Instructor, Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing, New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; Supervisor, Obstetrical and 
Gynecological Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1932-. 

Elizabeth J. Knox, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor and Assistant Director, 
Psychiatric Nursing Service 
Diploma in Nursing, Bloomingdale Hospital School of Nursing, 
1925; B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1928; Super- 
visor, Bloomingdale Hospital, 1925-1926 and 1927-1928; Charge 
of Private Sanatarium, Syracuse, 1929-1930; Instructor and As- 
sistant Director of Nurses, Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1930-1932; Instructor, Psychiatric Nursing, 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1933-; Assistant Director, 
Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic, New York Hospital, 1933-. 

Mary J. McElhinney, R.N. 

Instructor and Night Supervisor, Psychiatric 

Nursing Service 
Diploma in Nursing, Philadelphia Orthopaedic Hospital and In- 
firmary for Nervous Diseases, 1909; Student, Teachers College, 
Columbia University, 1931-1932; Private Duty, 1909-1918 and 
1920-1924; Night Supervisor, Philadelphia Orthopaedic Hospital 
and Infirmary for Nervous Diseases, 1924- 1926; Head Nurse, 
ibid., 1926-1931; Instructor, Psychiatric Nursing, New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; Assistant Night Supervisor, 
Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic, New York Hospital, 1933-; 
Night Supervisor, ibid., 1933-. 

Elizabeth Moser, B.A., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Surgical Nursing 

Service 
B.A. Bluffton College, Bluffton, Ohio, 1921; Diploma in Nursing, 
The Johns Hopkins Hospital School for Nurses, 1926; Staff Nurse, 
McCosh Infirmary, Princeton University, 1 927-1929 and 1930- 
193 1; Staff Nurse, Anglo-American Nursing Home, Rome, Italy, 

[39] 



1929-193°; Assistant Superintendent and Instructor, Practical 
Nursing, Palmerton Hospital, Palmerton, Pennsylvania, 1931- 
1932; Instructor, Surgical Nursing, New York Hospital School of 
Nursing, 193 2-; Supervisor, Surgical Nursing Service, New York 
Hospital, 1 932-. 

Grace Conway Nason, R.N. 

Instructor and Night Supervisor, 
Pediatric Nursing Service 
Diploma in Nursing, Lynn Hospital School of Nursing, 1927; 
Diploma in Psychiatric Nursing, McLean Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1927; Post-Graduate Course, Pediatrics, Babies' Hospi- 
tal, Western Reserve University, 1928; Student, Teachers College, 
Columbia University, 193 2- 1933; Night Supervisor, Marblehead 
Hospital, 1 927-1928; Supervisor and Instructor, Pediatric Nurs- 
ing Service, Metropolitan Hospital, 1929- 193 2; Instructor, 
Pediatric Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; 
Night Supervisor, Pediatric Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 
1 93 2-. 

Winifred I. Patterson, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor and Public Health 
Nurse, Tuberculosis District 
Diploma in Nursing, D. Ogden Mills School of Nursing, 1926; 
B.S. and Diploma in Supervision of Public Health Nursing, 
Teachers College, Columbia University, 1933; General Staff 
Nurse, Hospital of Rockefeller Institute, 1926-1927; Executive 
Secretary, Columbia County Committee on Tuberculosis and 
Public Health, 1928-1931; Instructor and Public Health Nurse, 
Tuberculosis District, New York Hospital, 1933-. 

Elizabeth W. Rogers, Ph.B., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Pediatric Out- 
Patient Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 
Chicago, 1924; Ph.B. The University of Chicago, 1932; School 
Nurse, Daytona Beach Public Schools, 1926-1929; General 
Staff Nurse and Head Nurse, Max Epstein Clinics and Pedi- 
atric Out-Patient Department, The University of Chicago Clin- 
ics, 1929-1932; Instructor, Pediatric Nursing, New York Hospital 

[40] 



School of Nursing, 1932-; Supervisor, Pediatric Out-Patient 
Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1932-. 

H. Margaret Rogers, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, General 
Operating Rooms 

Diploma in Nursing, The Johns Hopkins Hospital School for 
Nurses, 1923; Private Duty, 1923-1925; Relief Supervisor, Gyne- 
cological Operating Room, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Summer 
1925; Supervisor, Children's Ward, Waterbury Hospital, 1925- 
1926; Assistant Night Supervisor, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Sum- 
mer 1926; Assistant Operating Room Supervisor, ibid., 1926-1929; 
Supervisor, Operating Room, Garfield Memorial Hospital, Wash- 
ington, 1929-1932; Instructor, Operating Room Technique, New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; Supervisor, General Oper- 
ating Rooms, New York Hospital, 1932-. 

Theressa Sanman, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Medical Nursing 
Service 

Student, Peru Normal School, Nebraska, Summer 191 8; Student, 
University of Nebraska, Summer 1920; Diploma in Nursing, 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1925; Student, Teachers 
College, Columbia University, 1 927-1928; Part-time Student, 
ibid., 1930-1932; Teacher, Public Schools, 1917-1920; Private Duty 
1 925- 1 928; Teaching Supervisor, Medical and Surgical Service, 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1929-1931; Instructor, 
Medical Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; 
Supervisor, Medical Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1932-. 

Ethel M. Sykes, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Pediatric Nursing 

Service 
Teaching Certificate, West Riding Education Department, 
Yorkshire, England, 1921; Student, Geneseo Normal School, 
Summer 1925; Diploma in Nursing, Geneva General Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1929; Part-time Student, Teachers College, 
Columbia University, 1 929-1933; Part-time Student, Hunter 
College, 1930; Assistant Infants' Mistress, Westerton Council 

[41] 



School, Yorkshire, England, 1 921-1924; School Teacher, 1925- 
1926; Head Nurse, Medical Ward, Pediatric Department, Belle- 
vue Hospital, 1929; Assistant Teaching Supervisor, Pediatric 
Department, ibid., 1929-1932; Supervisor in Charge, Pediatric 
Department, ibid., 1 932-1933; Instructor, Pediatric Nursing 
Service, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1933-; Supervisor, 
Pediatric Service, New York Hospital, 1933-. 

Margery Treiber, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor of Nurseries, 
Obstetrical Nursing Service 
Diploma, Idaho Technical Institute, 191 9; Diploma in Nursing, 
Wesley Memorial Hospital School of Nursing, 1922; B.S. Teachers 
College, Columbia University, 1927; Private Duty, 1 922-1923 
and 1 924-1 926; General Staff Nurse, St. Luke's Hospital, San 
Francisco, 1923; General Staff Nurse, Pacific Hospital, Los 
Angeles, 1924; Chief Night Nurse, Oregon Short Line Emergency 
Hospital, Pocatello, Idaho, Summers 1 925-1926; Supervisor, 
Pediatric Department, Bellevue Hospital, 1 927-1 928; Supervisor 
in Charge, Pediatric Department, ibid., 1928-1929; Assistant 
Superintendent of Nurses, Reading General Hospital, 1929- 
1930; Supervisor of Wards, ibid., 1930-1932; Instructor, New Born 
Care, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; Supervisor of 
Nurseries, Obstetrical Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 
1 93 2-. 

Jeanette Walters, R.N. 

Instructor and Evening Supervisor, Obstetrical 
and Gynecological Nursing Service 
Diploma in Nursing, Temple University Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing, 1923; Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, 
Summer 1924; Post-Graduate Course, Obstetrics, Woman's 
Hospital, New York, 1932; Supervisor, Medical and Surgical 
Ward, Temple University Hospital, 1 924-1925; Supervisor, 
Babies' Hospital, Philadelphia, 1 926-1928; Assistant Superinten- 
dent, Columbia Hospital, 1928-1929; Supervisor, Obstetrical 
Department, Temple University Hospital, 1930; Instructor, 
Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing, New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, 1932-; Evening Supervisor, Obstetrical and Gyneco- 
logical Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 193 2-. 

[42] 



Muriel Weeks, R.N. 

Instructor, Operating Room Technique 
and Practice; Assistant Supervisor, 
General Operating Rooms 

Diploma in Nursing, Peter Bent Brigham Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1928; Plead Nurse, Private Ward; Assistant Supervisor, 
Operating Rooms; Teaching Supervisor, Operating Rooms, Peter 
Bent Brigham Hospital, 1929-1931; Private Duty, 1931 ; Super- 
visor, Eye Operating Room, Massachusetts Eye & Ear Infirmary, 
1931-1932; Head Nurse, Surgical Supply Room, New York Hospi- 
tal, 1 932-1933; Instructor, Operating Room Technique and Prac- 
tice, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1933-; Assistant 
Supervisor, General Operating Rooms, New York Hospital, 

1933- 

Catharine Weiser, M.A., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, 

Surgical Out-Patient Nursing Service 

B.A. Smith College, 1917; Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian 
Hospital School of Nursing, New York, 1920; M.A. Teachers 
College, Columbia University, 1931 ; Reconstruction Work, 
France, 1920-1921; Assistant Supervisor, Visiting Nurse Associa- 
tion, Chicago, 1 923-1 924; General Staff Nurse and Supervisor, 
Pediatrics, Yale University School of Nursing, 1924-1926; Super- 
visor, Dispensary, Holyoke Hospital, 1 927-1930; Instructor, 
Surgical Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; 
Supervisor, Surgical Out-Patient Nursing Service, New York 
Hospital, 1932-. 

Helen" E. Wharton, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Psychiatric Nursing 

Diploma in Nursing, Michael Reese Hospital School of Nursing, 
1930; Student, Teachers College, Columbia University and Field 
Work, Bloomingdale Hospital, 1930-1931; Part-time Student, 
Hunter College, 1932-1933; Night Supervisor, Obstetrics, Michael 
Reese Hospital, 1931-1932; Instructor, Psychiatric Nursing, 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; Supervisor, Payne 
Whitney Psychiatric Clinic, New York Hospital, 193 2-. 

[43] 



Isabel Willoughby, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Surgical 
and Urological Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Massachusetts General Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1924; B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 
1932; Head Nurse, Massachusetts General Hospital, 1925; 
Assistant Night Supervisor, Strong Memorial Hospital, 1926; 
Supervisor of Emergency Division, ibid., 1927; Supervisor, Wo- 
man's Surgical Division, ibid., 1928; Private Duty, 1929; Assis- 
tant Principal, Winchester Hospital School of Nursing, 1932; 
Instructor, Surgical and Urological Nursing, New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1933-; Supervisor, Surgical and Urological 
Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1933-. 

Margaret Wyatt, B.A., R.N. 

Instructor, Nursing Principles and Practice 

B.A. Meredith College, 1923; Diploma in Nursing, New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1927; Student, Teachers College, 
Columbia University, Summers 1931, 1932; Instructor and Assis- 
tant to the Dean of Women, Meredith College, 1 923-1924; Head 
Nurse, Surgical Ward, New York Hospital, 1 927-1930; Instructor, 
Nursing Principles and Practice, New York Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1930-. 



STUDENT AND STAFF HEALTH 

Evelyn Holt, M.D Physician-in-Charge 

Phyllis Greenacre, M.D Consultant Psychiatrist 

Elsie Davies, R.N Supervisor, Infirmary 



44] 



ASSISTANT INSTRUCTORS AND 
HEAD NURSES* 

Rita K. Ackhurst, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Obstetrical and Gynecological Operating Rooms 

Carolyn A. B as sett, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 

Men's Surgical Pavilion 
Vera M. Beach, R.N. 

Head Nurse, Private Patients' Floor 
Mabel Louise Bichy, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 

Obstetrical Pavilion 

Helena M. Collins, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Obstetrical Pavilion 

Mildred Colville, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Women's Surgical Pavilion 

Eleanor Mae Corrigan, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 

Men's Admission Floor, Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic 

Helen M. Daum, B.S., R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Men's Medical Pavilion 

Dorothy Mae Dickerman, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Gynecological Pavilion 
Cornelia Eckardt, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 

Women's Acute Floor, Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic 

Helen H. Eilola, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Obstetrical and Gynecological Isolation Pavilion 

*Arranged alphabetically 

[45] 



Alice Fogg, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Labor and Delivery Rooms 

Helen Scammell Foley, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Isolation Pavilion 

Catherine Fopeano, B.S., R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Charge Nurse, 
Labor and Delivery Rooms 

Joan Fraser, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Charge Nurse, 
Labor and Delivery Rooms 

Camilla Gaute 

Instructor, Massage 

Mildred L. Harrington, R.N. 

Head Nurse, Private Patients' Floor 

Rosina Haubner, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Assistant Head Nurse, 
Urological Pavilion 

Thirza Hills, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Women's Surgical Pavilion 

Dorothy Adeline Huey, B.A., B.N., R.N. 

Assistant Instructor, Nursing Principles 
and Practice 

Rosalyn E. Jacobs, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Men's and Women's Pavilion 

Margaret Joinville, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 

Women's Admission Floor, Payne Whitney Psychiaric Clinic 

Margaret Kelly, R.N. 

Head Nurse, Pediatric Metabolic Unit 

[46] 



Mrs. Alice Kohler, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse 
Surgical Supply Room 

Elizabeth Viola Kribs, R.N. 

Head Nurse, Private Patients' Floor 

Veronica Lyons, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Obstetrical Pavilion 

Lucy Jane MacDonald, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Accident Pavilion 

Christine MacLeod, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Private Obstetrical Pavilion 

Elizabeth M. McLowd, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Private Gynecological Pavilion 

Margaret Meredith, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Women's Convalescent Floor, Payne Whitney 
Psychiatric Clinic 

Kathleen Mills, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Men's Surgical Pavilion 

Katherine W. Nelson, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Men's Convalescent Floor, Payne Whitney 
Psychiatric Clinic 

Janet F. Potter, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Obstetrical and Gynecological Admission Pavilion 

Mrs. Margaret Rathbone, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 

Men's Acute Floor, Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic 

[47] 



Jane Rogers, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Pediatric Pavilion 

Mildred Stone, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Substitute Head Nurse, 
Pediatric Pavilion 

Dorothy A. Vernstrom, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Women's Medical Pavilion 

Myrna Wight, R.N. 

Head Nurse, Private Patients' Floor 

Rosamond Young 

Assistant Instructor, Physical Education 
Assistant Director, Nurses' Residence 



ASSISTANTS IN ADMINISTRATION 



Flora Josephine Bergstrom, R.N. 
Dorothy Jacobus, B.A., R.N. 
Mrs. Mary Carven, R.N. 
Mrs. Evelyn McGowan, B.A. 



Librarian 

Secretary-Registrar 

Secretary 

Secretary 



4 8 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY MEDICAL COLLEGE 
FACULTY PARTICIPATING IN INSTRUCTION* 

Charles R. Stockard, M.D. 

Professor of Anatomy 

Philip B. Armstrong, M.D. 

Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

William J. Elser, M.D. 

Professor of Bacteriology and Immunology 

George W. Wheeler, M.D. 

Assistant Professor of Bacteriology 

Ralph G. Stillman, M.D. 

Assistant Professor of Clinical Pathology 

Stanley R. Benedict, M.D. 

Professor of Chemistry 

Gladys J. Fashexa, M.A. 

Assistant in Chemistry 

Eugene F. DuBois, M.D., axd Staff 

Professor of Medicine 

Henricus J. Staxder, M.D., axd Staff 

Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Oscar M. Schloss, M.D., axd Staff 

Professor of Pediatrics 

George S. Amsdex, M.D., axd Staff 

Professor of Psychiatry 

Herbert Spexcer Gasser, M.D. 

Professor of Physiology 

William H. Chambers, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Physiology 

George S. Heuer, M.D., axd Staff 

Professor of Surgery 

*Arranged alphabetically according to Department. 

[49] 



MEMBERS OF AFFILIATING ORGANIZATIONS 



Hazel Corbin, R.N. 

General Director 



Maternity Center Association 



Margaret A. Wales, B.S., R.N. 

General Director of Nursing 

Visiting Nurse Service, Henry Street Settlement 



[5c] 



THE SOCIETY OF THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 



THE 

NEW YORK HOSPITAL 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

1934-1935 



VOLUME III NUMBER I 



THE SOCIETY OF THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 

THE 

NEW YORK HOSPITAL 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Associated with Cornell University 




Announcement 



*934 • 1935 



Volume hi 



Number i 



CALENDAR 



1934 

September 29 

October 1 . 
November 6 
November 29 
December 2 
December 23 
January 1 
December 25 



Matriculation and Registration (First 

year, first term students) 
Winter Term begins — Classes convene 
Election Day — A holiday 

Thanksgiving Recess (First year students 
only) 

Christmas Vacation (First year students 
only) 

Christmas Day — A holiday 



1935 
January 1 
January 2 
January 19 



January 21 
February 22 
May 11.. 
May 13 . . 
May 30 . . 

July 4 • • ■ 

September 28 



September 30 



New Year's Day — A holiday 

Classes convene 

Winter Term ends. Matriculation and 

Registration (First year, first term 

students) 
Spring Term begins — Classes convene 
Washington's Birthday — A holiday 
Spring Term ends 

Summer Term begins — Classes convene 
Memorial Day — A holiday 
Independence Day — A holiday 
Summer Term ends 

(Four weeks' vacation within the summer term for 
all second year students and for first year stu- 
dents who enter in the spring term. Three 
weeks' vacation for first year students who en- 
tered in winter term.) 

Winter Term begins — Classes convene 



Note: All holidays above indicated are observed by first year students. No classes will be 
held on these days for second and third year students. 



HISTORY AND GENERAL 
STATEMENT 



THE New York Hospital, the second oldest hospital in 
America, received its charter of incorporation under 
George the Third of England on the 13th day of June, 1771, 
under the title of the Society of the Hospital in the City of 
New York in America. Subsequently by an Act of the Legis- 
lature in 1 8 10 the title was changed to the Society of The 
New York Hospital. 

Although only a stone's throw from the present site of 
the Brooklyn Bridge, the building known as the New York 
Hospital was then erected so far out of town that it was con- 
sidered at too great a distance from the activities of the 
city. This institution added new buildings and continued 
its usefulness to the community until 1870, when it was 
deemed advisable to find a new location. The property 
known as the Thorne Mansion was purchased, on the south 
side of Sixteenth Street, between Fifth and Sixth Avenues, 
and extending through to Fifteenth Street. In 1877 the 
buildings were completed, some of which have been occupied 
up to 1932. 

The first systematic and scientific training for nurses, 
through lectures and practical instruction on the wards, 
was begun in 1799 under the direction and tutelage of Dr. 
Valentine Seaman and continued throughout his association 
with the hospital until 1817. 

Shortly after the opening of the hospital at its new site 
it was determined to establish a school of nursing, the first 
class of which was admitted in 1877. Since then more than 
twelve hundred students have been graduated many of 
whom are to be found in important positions of administra- 
tion and teaching in schools of nursing and in public health 
organizations as well as in the field of private nursing. 

In June, 1927, the New York Hospital formed an asso- 
ciation with the Cornell University Medical College. The 

[3] 



resources of each institution were increased and an exten- 
sive program of building was begun. 

The new plant, situated on York Avenue between Sixty- 
eighth and Seventy-first Streets, was opened September, 
1932, and offers unusual opportunities and facilities for 
the progressive development of the school of nursing. The 
hospital with a potential capacity of one thousand beds 
cares for all types of acutely ill patients including medi- 
cal, surgical, obstetrical, gynecological, pediatric and psy- 
chiatric, and the out-patient department provides ample 
opportunity for the study of ambulatory patients. 

A special building for the school of nursing is adjacent 
to the hospital buildings. It provides adequate and well 
equipped classrooms, laboratories, library and recreation 
rooms as well as attractive and comfortable living accom- 
modations for the students and faculty. 

Further necessary laboratory and library facilities are 
available through the association with the Cornell Uni- 
versity Medical College. 

Affiliation is made with the Henry Street Visiting Nurse 
Service for field experience in public health nursing; with 
the Maternity Center Association for field experience in 
obstetrical nursing and with Greenwich House Settlement 
for practice in nursery school methods. 

The Social Service Department of the New York Hospital 
participates in the nursing program by the integration of 
social service throughout the entire course of study. 

The school of nursing is registered with the Regents of 
New York State which permits its graduates to take the State 
Board examinations in order to secure state registration. 

Requirements for Admission 

The matriculation requirement is satisfactory graduation 
from an accredited high school or recognized preparatory 
school in which the following units of study should have 
been taken: 

[4] 



English 3 units 

History I unit 

Civics J/2 unit 

Mathematics 2 units 

(Algebra 1 unit; plane geometry 1 unit) 
Science 2 units 

(Chemistry required; physics advised) 
Foreign Language 3 units 

(Three units of one language or two in 

each of two) 
Electives ^14 units 



It is also advised that all students review arithmetic before 
entrance. 

Emphasis is placed upon scholarship of applicants. Prefer- 
ence in admission will be given to those who have had ad- 
vanced study. It is advised that prospective students from 
college have introductory zoology or biology and psychology. 

Besides these scholastic admission requirements students 
should be at least twenty and not over thirty years of age 
and must present evidence of physical and personal fitness 
for nursing. 

A personal conference of the student and her parent or 
guardian with the Director of the School of Nursing is desir- 
able and should be arranged after formal application has 
been submitted to the school. An appointment for an inter- 
view will be made upon request. 

All applications for admission should be addressed to the 
Director of the School of Nursing, 525 East Sixty-eighth 
Street, New York, New York. 

Exceptions to these matriculation requirements may be 
made only by offering substitutions satisfactory to the Com- 
mittee on Admissions. 

Advanced Standing 

Advanced standing may be granted those students who 
present credentials showing satisfactory completion of 
courses of study taken in other schools deemed of similar or 

[5] 



equal value to those given in the New York Hospital School 
of Nursing. 

An applicant who has received her baccalaureate degree 
will have her time in the school reduced four months if she 
maintains a scholastic standing in the first and second years 
of an average of "B" grade. 

Accrediting by Cornell University 

Through an affiliation between the College of Home 
Economics of Cornell University and the New York Hospital 
School of Nursing it is possible for students who are especi- 
ally interested in home economics as well as in nursing to 
take a course which is divided between these two institutions 
and which extends from five to five and one-half years. At 
least two and one-half years should be spent at Cornell and 
two years and ten months at the School of Nursing. At the 
end of this period students taking this course will be awarded 
the degree of Bachelor of Science from Cornell and a nurse's 
diploma from the New York Hospital School of Nursing. 

Students may start the course at either institution. How- 
ever, in order to receive a B.S. degree it is necessary to spend 
the final year at Cornell. Students who go first to the College 
of Home Economics should spend the first year at Cornell, 
this period to be followed at the School of Nursing with the 
final period taken at Cornell. Students coming to the New 
York Hospital first should finish the nursing course before 
going to Cornell. Students who have received the nurse's 
diploma from the New York Hospital School of Nursing will 
be credited with not less than forty-five hours or one and 
one-half years of college credit toward the degree of B.S. at 
Cornell. 

During their work at the two institutions students must 
meet the requirements of the College of Home Economics of 
Cornell University as well as the requirements of the New 
York Hospital School of Nursing. Suggested arrangements 
of courses for those students who go first to Cornell may be 
secured from advisers or from the Secretary of the College 

[6] 



of Home Economics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York. 

It must be understood that in order to be accepted by the 
College of Home Economics from the New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, or vice versa, applicants must present a 
high record of work both in high school and at whichever 
school they first matriculate, besides fulfilling other require- 
ments for entrance to the College of Home Economics or to 
the New York Hospital School of Nursing. 

Announcement of the College of Home Economics may be 
secured by writing to the Secretary, Cornell University, 
Ithaca, New York. 

The Curriculum 

The three-year curriculum of the school of nursing is so 
planned as to give each student a thorough understanding 
of the basic sciences and principles underlying good nursing 
and of the best methods to use in the care of the sick, in the 
prevention of disease, and in health education. 

Each of the three school years is divided into terms of 
sixteen weeks each. Classes are admitted to the school twice 
a year. To carry out the program of study, each student 
shares proportionately in the nursing services of the hos- 
pital, out-patient department, and affiliating organizations. 

During the first twenty-four weeks limited practice is 
assigned in the pavilions of the hospital and the clinics of 
the out-patient department while a greater amount of time 
is spent in class and laboratory. In the subsequent seven 
and one-half terms the students' nursing practice increases 
in length of time and in responsibility and a sequence is 
planned to include the various types of clinical services 
during day, evening and night periods in order that the 
students may acquire complete understanding of patients' 
needs. 

The schedule of each student during three clinical terms 
includes lectures, laboratory, clinic or class periods approxi- 
mating four hours per week. Nursing practice is assigned 
on a basis of an eight hour day, evening or night. Personal 

[7l 



and group conferences and case studies will be required of 
all students. 

Requirements of Scholarship and for Graduation 

Students will be graded in their studies on a basis of 
weighted quality points with an average of two quality 
points required for promotion and graduation. 

The following grading system has been established: 

A — Excellent 4 quality points 

B — Good 3 quality points 

C — Average 1 quality points 

D — Pass 1 quality point 

F — Failure -1 quality point 

I — Incomplete . given in cases of absence and 

not because of poor scholarship 
Failure in any given subject may necessitate withdrawal 
from the school unless the student's scholarship is excep- 
tional in other respects in which case repetition of the course 
may be recommended by the instructor. 

Fees 

Matriculation Fee $10.00 

Payable at first registration; not refunded. 
Tuition Fee 60.00 

Payable at first registration; not refunded after 

second week for any cause of withdrawal. 
Laboratory Fee 10.00 

Payable at first registration; not refunded. 
Health Service Fee 5.00 

Payable at first registration; not refunded. 
Chemistry Laboratory Breakage Fee .... 5.00 

Payable at first registration; amount not used for 

breakage to be refunded or excess breakage to be 

paid. 
Graduation Fee 15.00 

To be required of all students graduating in 1937 

[8] 



and thereafter. Payable at registration third 
term, third year. Refunded if student is not 
graduated. 
Total Fees for New York Hospital School of 

Nursing $105.00 

Tuition Fee for Henry Street Visiting Nurse 

Service 25.00 

Total $130.00 

In addition to above fees students pay a Student Activity 
Fee of $5.00 each year. This is collected by the class 
Treasurer. 

Maintenance and General Expense 

Room, board and limited laundry are provided each stu- 
dent while she is in the school. 

First-year students must furnish their own aprons and 
bibs, purchased through the school of nursing at a cost of 
approximately sixteen dollars. Except for this part of the 
uniform all uniforms are furnished each student during her 
course of study. 

The cost of text books, educational supplies and miscel- 
laneous articles, largely determined by personal require- 
ments, must be borne by each student; these may be esti- 
mated to amount to approximately seventy-five dollars for 
the first year, fifty dollars for the second and third years. 

During field experience with public health or social agen- 
cies students must defray incurred expenses for lunches and 
for carfare. These expenses for the three years amount to 
approximately twenty-five dollars. 

For the three year course it is estimated that the cost to 
the student will be approximately three hundred and sixty 
dollars. 

A list of limited necessary personal equipment will be sent 
each prospective student when her application is accepted. 

Registration and Orientation 
First-year students entering in the Winter term must 

[9] 



register at the school by noon on Saturday, September 
twenty-ninth; those entering in the Spring term by noon on 
Saturday, January nineteenth. 

A brief orientation program precedes formal instruction 
during which time students take required psychological 
tests, an arithmetic pre-test, have necessary physical exam- 
inations with Schick and Dick tests, confer with faculty 
advisers and secure uniforms, books and other equipment. 

Health Regulations and Service 

The school of nursing maintains a health service for its 
students. A well equipped infirmary and necessary staff are 
provided in the nurses' residence. A physical examination by 
the school physician, with chest x-rays, is required upon 
admission to the school and subsequent annual physical 
examinations will be given. 

Vaccinations against typhoid fever and smallpox will be 
requested of all students before admission to the school. 
Schick, Dick and Mantou tests will be given during the pre- 
clinical period. For all students having positive Schick tests 
immunization will be required. 

Infirmary care for minor illnesses will be limited to four 
weeks at any one time in the case of all students. For more 
serious illnesses requiring constant attention students will be 
cared for gratuitously in the hospital for not more than two 
weeks at any one time for the first-year students and not 
more than four weeks at any one time for second and third- 
year students. 

Vacations and Other Absences 

During the first and second years a vacation of four weeks 
is planned and during the third year a vacation of two weeks. 
For first-year students admitted in the Winter term one 
week's vacation is given at Christmas (see calendar) and 
three weeks during the Summer term. For first-year students 
admitted in the Spring term and for all second-year students a 
vacation of four weeks is planned during the Summer term 

[10] 



of the year. For third-year students a two weeks' vacation 
may be planned during any one of the three terms. This va- 
cation is not given to those students who have an exemption 
of time. 

All vacations are arranged by the school of nursing to con- 
form to the requirements of the educational program and the 
fields in which clinical practice is obtained. 

Except for first-year students during their first term, holi- 
days are observed only in connection with class schedules. 

As a result of absences the repetition of a course of study 
or special examinations may be required; class registration 
may be changed and in most instances nursing practice will 
have to be made up. 

Scholarship Aid and Loan Fund 

Through the generosity of a friend of the school of nursing, 
scholarship aid is made available to a limited number of 
students who have proven themselves well fitted for the pro- 
fession, who have high standards of scholarship and who are 
in financial need. A student loan fund has also been estab- 
lished to give necessary financial aid to those students who 
show promise in their chosen field. 

Applications for scholarship aid and student loans should 
be made to the Director of the School. 

Social and Extra-Curricular Opportunities 

Believing that the education of young women today must 
include activities relating to healthful social relationships, 
the Board of Governors has made generous provision for 
this development in the student life of the school. 

The beautiful new fireproof, sixteen-story residence, 
erected adjacent to the hospital buildings, is the center 
for these activities. Every effort has been made in its con- 
struction to provide for the normal and healthy life of 
students and faculty. 

Each of the eight student residence floors contains attrac- 
tively furnished single bedrooms with lavatories for each 

In] 



student, ample common baths, showers and toilet facilities, a 
common sitting-room with adjoining kitchenette for informal 
gatherings and a laundryette. 

Comfortable lounges, reading, reception and dining-rooms 
are on the first and ground floors. 

For further recreational activities, a large well equipped 
gymnasium, billiard-room, game-room and porches are 
available. By special arrangement the swimming pool of the 
Lenox Hill Neighborhood Association is available for use. 

To insure the full benefit and proper use of these facilities 
well qualified instructors are appointed to direct the social 
and recreational activities of the school. 

School Government 

The school of nursing has a cooperative government in 
which the students take an active part. A student organiza- 
tion has been established and has developed plans for the 
social discipline of its group. 

An annual student activities fee of five dollars is required 
and collected by each class. 



12] 



THE CURRICULUM 



FIRST YEAR 



Class and Approximate Credit 
Laboratory Hours Hours 

Hours Practice 



Anatomy 60 

Bacteriology and Pathology . . 65 

Chemistry 60 

Physiology 45 

History of Nursing 30 

Nursing Ethics 15 

Social and Economic Aspects of 

Health and Disease 30 

Nursing Principles and Practice . 136 

Elementary Psychology .... 30 

Psychology of Deviate Behavior 15 

Development of Behavior in 

Children 30 

Materia Medica 45 

Nutrition and Cookery .... 30 

Diet Therapy 30 

Medical Diseases 40 j 

Communicable Diseases .... 22 | 

Medical Nursing 15 

Surgical Diseases 40 

Surgical Nursing 15 

(Orientation — 22 hours — no credit) 



300 



492 
492 



2 
2 
2 

*A 

2 

1 
2 

6 

2 
1 

2 
3 

*a 

*A 

4 
5 

5 



Totals 753 



1284 46 



13 



SECOND YEAR 

Class and 

Laboratory 

Hours 

Medical Nursing 

Diet Therapy Practice 

Operative Technique 8 

Pediatrics 24 

Pediatric Nursing 36 

Obstetrics and Gynecology . . 44 
Obstetrical and Gynecological 

Nursing 16 708 



Approximate 

Hours 

Practice 


Credit 
Hours 


I92 


iK 


I92 


iM 


376 


4 


. . . 


iK 


708 


8K 



Totals 128 2176 27 



[14 



THIRD YEAR 



Class and 

Laboratory 

Hours 



Approximate Credit 
Hours Hours 



Medical Nursing 8 

Diet Therapy Practice 

Surgical Nursing 8 

Emergency Nursing 16 

Mental Hygiene 12 

Psychiatry 20 

Psychiatric Nursing 40 

Special Therapeutics 

Community Health 15 

Community Nursing Practice 
Out-Patient Nursing Practice 
Private Patient Nursing Practice 

Professional Problems 15 



Totals 134 

First Year Total Hours and 

Credits 753 

Second Year Total Hours and 

Credits 128 

Third Year Total Hours and 

Credits 134 



Practice 
264 

88 
396 



Grand Totals 1015 



484 
176 

384 
192 
192 

2176 

1284 
2176 
2176 

5636 



27 

46 

27 

27 
100 



15 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

Anatomy 

This course includes both gross and microscopical anatomy. 
The gross anatomy is taught by lectures, demonstrations and 
student dissection of the cadaver. The microscopical work is 
directly correlated with the gross dissection and includes lectures, 
demonstrations and a detailed study of prepared slides by the 
students. Significant embryological information is included in 
the lectures. 

60 Hours, First Year 
Dr. Armstrong* 

Bacteriology and Pathology 

The study of the habits and morphology of microorganisms 
emphasizing those of pathogenic character; sources, modes and 
prevention of infection; disinfection and asepsis; the more impor- 
tant tissue changes occurring in the healing process, infections 
and neoplasms; clinical microscopy of the blood and blood group- 
ing; kidney function and urinalysis. Practical demonstrations and 
applications will be made which will relate directly to nursing. 
The blood group of each student will be ascertained and recorded. 
Lectures, recitations and laboratory. 

44 Hours, First Year — Bacteriology 

21 Hours, First Year — Pathology 

Dr. Wheeler, Dr. Stillman and Miss Thomas 

Chemistry 

A course designed to acquaint students with the fundamental 
principles of inorganic and physiological chemistry with special 
application to nursing practice. Studies in the general composition 
of the blood and urine, and in the digestion and utilization of 
foods are included. Lectures, recitations and laboratory. 

60 Hours, First Year 
Instructor to be appointed 

Materia Medica 

A course designed to acquaint the student with the fundamental 
weights, measures, terms and symbols used in the preparation and 

*On leave of absence. 

fi61 



administration of drugs, common antiseptics, disinfectants and 
other solutions. A study of important and commonly used drugs; 
their preparation, dosage, administration, physiological and thera- 
peutic actions, idiosyncracies, cumulative and toxic effects, anti- 
dotes and emergency treatments. Emphasis is placed on the accu- 
rate administration of drugs and their effects, through supervised 
practice in nursing courses. 

45 Hours, First Year 
Instructor to be appointed 

Medicine 

i. Medical Diseases 

Medical aspects of diseases are considered in these lectures and 
clinics. Material presented will supplement, emphasize or interpret 
required reading covering etiology, sources of infection, sympto- 
mology usual course, pathology, complications, treatment, progno- 
sis and prevention. 

40 Hours, First Year 
Dr. DuBois and staff 

2. Communicable Diseases 

A study of communicable diseases, including tuberculosis. Spe- 
cial emphasis is placed upon etiology, modes of transmission and 
prevention. Lectures and clinics. 

11 Hours, First Year 
Dr. DuBois and staff 

3. Principles of Medical Nursing Including Communicable Dis- 

ease Nursing 

Through lectures, clinics and demonstrations, students are 
taught principles and methods of nursing as applied to the care of 
medical patients. In the third year emphasis is placed upon the 
managerial and teaching problems. 

1 5 Hours, First Year 
8 Hours, Third Year 
Miss Amberson, Miss Huey and Mrs. Barbour 

4. Practice of Medical Nursing Including Communicable Disease 

Nursing 

Supervised practice and study of the application of medical 

[17] 



nursing principles and methods to the care of patients on the 
medical pavilions of the hospital. In addition students study and 
practice medical aseptic nursing as related to the care of patients 
suffering from communicable diseases including tuberculosis. Prac- 
tice includes care of patients during day, evening and night. 
Demonstrations and conferences. 

948 Hours, First, Second and Third Years 

(Includes 192 hours of communicable disease nursing) 

Miss Amberson, Miss Huey, Mrs. Barbour and staff 

5. Practice in Care of Private Patients 
Application of principles of medical and surgical nursing to the 

care of private patients. 

192 Hours, Third Year 
Miss Moffatt and staff 

Nursing 

1. Orientation 

This course is designed to give the beginning student a general 
conception of the field of nursing; the responsibilities and obliga- 
tions of each individual in choosing the profession; the importance 
of general conduct in building up the right habits of living and 
attitudes of the nurse. Includes lectures in personal hygiene em- 
phasizing the importance of physical and mental health especially 
as it relates to the life of the nurse and is reflected in her work. 

22 Hours, First Year 

No credit 
Miss Wolf, Miss Kennedy, Miss Frost 

2. Principles of Nursing 

A course designed to give the student a basic understanding of 
the principles of nursing with emphasis upon her attitude toward 
her patient, the existing social relationships, the physical require- 
ments for the proper care of patients and the procedures found 
most helpful in their care. 

136 Hours, First Year 

Miss Wyatt and Mrs. Barbour 

3. Practice of Elementary Nursing 

The application of the theories of nursing in laboratory prac- 
tice in the surgical supply room and in the actual care of con- 

[18] 



valescent patients in the pavilions and out-patient department of 
the hospital. 

300 Hours, First Year 

Miss Wyatt, Mrs. Barbour and Mrs. Kohler 

4. History of Nursing 

A survey of the historical development of nursing from its early 
conception to modern times. Lectures and recitations. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Anderson 

5. Nursing Ethics 

A general consideration of fundamental ethical and philosophi- 
cal principles and their application to problems which arise in the 
practice of nursing. An attempt will be made to coordinate this 
course closely with each course of nursing practice through class 
discussions of pertinent problems. 

15 Hours, First Year 
Miss Wolf 

6. Professional Problems 

Through a general survey of the nursing field, the student has 
an opportunity to learn the trends and advances in the profession; 
the need and opportunities for specialized preparation; the im- 
portance and types of legislation; the activities of professional 
organizations and the obligations of their members. Lectures 
and recitations. 

15 Hours, Third Year 
Miss Wolf 

7. Emergency Nursing 

This course is intended to supplement the instruction in nursing 
and deals with the application of these principles to emergency 
situations in the home and community. It demonstrates also the 
methods of teaching first aid to various groups. Lectures and 
demonstrations. 

16 Hours, Third Year 
Dr. Redden 

See description of other courses in nursing relating to specific 
clinical fields. 

[19] 



Nutrition 
i. Nutrition and Cookery 

An elementary course in normal human nutrition with emphasis 
upon the preparation and the utilization of food by the body in 
health. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Hague 

2. Diet Therapy 

A course designed to present the underlying principles in treat- 
ment of disease by means of special dietaries. Lectures, recita- 
tions and laboratory. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Hague 

3. Practice of Diet Therapy 

The application of the principles of diet therapy in supervised 
practice on the pavilions in the hospital and out-patient clinic. 
Conferences and case studies. 

280 Hours, Second and Third Years 
Miss Gillam, Miss Hague and staff 

Obstetrics and Gynecology 

1. Obstetrics and Gynecology 

This course deals with physiological and pathological changes 
during pregnancy, labor, and the puerperium; the care of 
the normal newborn; the nutrition of the mother and baby; 
the prevention of complications; the social significance of infant 
and maternal mortality; the relation of obstetrics to various 
gynecological conditions; the results of infection and tumor 
growth and the required surgical interference and operative 
treatment. Lectures, clinics and conferences. 

44 Hours, Second Year 
Dr. Stander and staff 
Miss Aulls 

2. Principles of Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing 

This course emphasizes the importance of prenatal instruction, 
observation and care; infant, obstetrical and gynecological nurs- 

[20] 



ing procedure with particular attention to infections and their 
special therapy. Classes, demonstrations and conferences. 

1 6 Hours, Second Year 

Miss Hickcox, Miss Klein, Miss Treiber, Miss Geuss 

3. Practice of Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing 

Under supervised practice in the pavilions, nurseries, operating 
rooms, labor and delivery rooms, and out-patient department, 
students have the opportunity to observe and care for infants and 
obstetrical and gynecological patients. Case studies and confer- 
ences. 

708 Hours, Second Year 

Miss Hickcox, Miss Jones, Miss Klein, Miss Treiber, 

Miss Geuss and staff 

Pediatrics 

1. Pediatrics 

This course deals with normal growth and development and 
the diseases of infancy and childhood, with emphasis on infant 
welfare, prevention of morbidity and mortality and infant nutri- 
tion. Lectures and clinics. 

24 Hours, Second Year 
Dr. Levine and staff 

2. Principles of Pediatric Nursing 

The basic principles in the care of normal and sick infants and 
children are given together with the social and educational aspects 
of their treatment and behavior as normal children. Classes and 
demonstrations. 

36 Hours, Second Year 

Miss Schubert, Miss Rogers, Miss Boquist, Miss Sykes 

3. Practice of Pediatric Nursing 

This consists of supervised experience in aseptic nursing meth- 
ods in the care of infants and children on the pavilions, formula 
laboratory, premature nursery and out-patient department. 
Case studies and conferences. 

708 Hours, Second Year 

Miss Schubert, Miss Rogers, Miss Boquist, Miss Sykes, 

Miss Geiger, Miss Nason, Miss Angerstein and staff 

[21] 



4- Development of Behavior of Children 

A study of the normal child and his behavior. The susceptibility 

of the child's behavior responses to the various details of family 

life and of school will be emphasized. Lectures, recitations and 

clinics. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Professor Whitley 

Personal Hygiene and Public Health 

I. Personal Hygiene 

(8 hours — Included in Orientation Course.) 

1. Physical Education 

Each student will be required to participate in regular physical 
exercise designed primarily to maintain positive health with em- 
phasis upon posture and corrective measures and to stimulate 
sportsmanship. 

128 Hours, First Year 

64 Hours, Second and Third Years 

Miss McDermott and Miss Young 

3. Social and Economic Aspects of Health and Disease 

A course of study given concurrently with the lectures on medi- 
cal diseases emphasizing their social and economic aspects. It 
deals with the prevention of sickness and the promotion of health, 
with consideration of the contributing factors in home and com- 
munity. Lectures, conferences and visits of observation. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Frost 

4. Community Health 

A course of study given as preparation for practice in commu- 
nity nursing. It considers the aims and scope of public health 
activities and the part of the nurse in this program. The relation- 
ship between the hospital and other health and social agencies of 
the community is emphasized. Lectures, conferences, family case 
studies. 

15 Hours, Third Year 
Miss Frost 

[22] 



5. Community Nursing Principles and Practice 

Supervised nursing practice in the out-patient department and 
in the home through affiliation with community agencies; empha- 
sis upon family health supervision and cooperation with the var- 
ious official and non-official health and social organizations; con- 
tact with the home also furnished in the out-patient department 
through the social service department and the tuberculosis dis- 
trict. 

384 Hours, Third Year 

Henry Street Visiting Nurse Service 

192 Hours, Third Year 

Medical and Surgical Out-Patient Department 

Miss Frost, Miss Banfield, Miss Weiser, Miss 

Patterson and staff of social service 

Physiology 

This course is designed to give a basic understanding of the 
functions of the normal human body as an essential prerequisite 
to the study of health and nutrition and the pathological changes 
due to disease. Lectures, recitations, laboratory, demonstrations. 

45 Hours, First Year 
Dr. Grundfest 

Psychiatry 

1. Psychiatry 

A course of study designed to acquaint students with psycho- 
pathic conditions, their prevalence, social aspects, etiology, 
pathology, prevention and treatment. Lectures. 

20 Hours, Third Year 

Dr. Amsden, Dr. Henry, Dr. Tiebout and staff 

2. Principles of Psychiatric Nursing 

This course is organized to give students an understanding of 
the basic principles in the nursing care of psychopathic patients 
and the nursing procedure used in their treatment. Emphasis is 
placed also upon the relation of mental illness to physical illness 
and the effects of child behavior on future adult life. Classes, 
demonstrations and clinics. 

40 Hours, Third Year 

Miss Sprogell, Miss Knox and staff 

[23] 



3- Practice of Psychiatric Nursing 

The application of the principles of psychiatric nursing through 
supervised practice in the care of children and adults in the hospi- 
tal and out-patient department. Behavior studies required; con- 
ferences. 

484 Hours, Third Year 

Miss Knox, Miss Falls, Miss Wharton, Miss Gudelsky and staff 

4. Special Therapeutics 

This study gives the student an understanding of the use of 
hydrotherapy and occupational and recreational therapies in the 
care of mentally ill patients. Conferences and practice. 
176 Hours, Third Year 
Miss Gunderson, Miss Hibbler and Mr. Lawson 

5. Mental Hygiene 

A course of study designed to acquaint students with the mental 
hygiene movement, origin, growth and development, need and 
importance for psychiatric clinics, child guidance clinics and com- 
munity education. 

12 Hours, Third Year 
Dr. Greenacre and staffs of Social Service 
and Nursery School Departments 

Psychology 

1. Elementary Psychology 

An introduction to the study of human behavior and the under- 
lying principles of mental adjustments and habit formation. 
An effort will be made to apply this study to the adjustment of 
the student to her own personality as it affects her professional 
life, and to the better understanding of the adjustment of patients 
to their illnesses. Recitations and lectures. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Kennedy 

2. Development of Behavior of Children. (See Pediatrics.) 

3. Psychology of Deviate Behavior 

Consideration of mental hygiene and a study of the deviations 
from usual behavior in adults and children to an understanding 
of such adjustments patients may profitably make to their ill- 
nesses. Lectures, recitations and clinics. 

1 5 Hours, First Year 
Miss Kennedy 

[24] 



Surgery 
i. Surgical Diseases 

Surgical aspects of diseases are presented in these lectures and 
clinics. Factors determining the need for surgical interference are 
discussed and the major steps in the operation outlined. Special 
emphasis is placed upon signs, symptoms and observations which 
should be made both preceding and following operation as well as 
upon points which should be stressed in nursing these patients. 

40 Hours, First Year 
Dr. Heuer and staff 

2. Principles of Surgical Nursing 

Through lectures, clinics and demonstrations students are 
taught the principles and methods of surgical asepsis and the nurs- 
ing of surgical patients. In the third year emphasis is placed upon 
managerial and teaching problems. 
15 Hours, First Year 
8 Hours, Third Year 
Miss Amberson, Miss Moser, Miss Keller, Miss Willoughby 

3. Practice of Surgical Nursing 

Supervised practice and study of the application of surgical 
nursing principles to the care of pre-operative and post-operative 
patients on surgical pavilions of the hospital. Practice includes 
care of patients during day, evening and night. Demonstrations 
and conferences. 

888 Hours, First and Third Years 

Miss Amberson, Miss Moser, Miss Keller, Miss 

Willoughby, Miss Boyer, Miss Kay and staff 

4. Operative Technique 

This course is designed to give thorough preparation and to de- 
velop skill in surgical aseptic technique; to develop alertness to 
observations of significant changes in patients during the admin- 
istration of anaesthetics; to develop dexterity and intelligent 
response in assisting with operations and in meeting emergencies. 
Six weeks general operating room, two weeks gynecological operat- 
ing room. 

8 Hours lectures, demonstrations and conferences 
376 Hours, practice — Second Year 
Miss Rogers, Mrs. Ray and Miss Jensen 

[25] 



The Society of the New York Hospital 

GOVERNORS 

Wilson M. Powell President 

Bronson Winthrop Treasurer 

Augustine J. Smith Secretary 

Henry W. DeForest William Woodward Frank L. Polk 

Howard Townsend Arthur Iselin John Hay Whitney 

Charles S. Brown G. Beekman Hoppin William Vincent Astor 

Henry G. Barbey Lewis Cass Ledyard, Jr. George F. Baker 

Cornelius N. Bliss R. Horace Gallatin Barklie McKee Henry 

Paul Tuckerman Joseph H. Choate, Jr. Langdon P. Marvin 

United States Trust Company of New York 
Assistant Treasurer 

COMMITTEE ON NURSING 



Barklie McKee Henry, Chairman 



Langdon P. Marvin 



Paul Tuckerman 



Council of the School of Nursing 

Wilson M. Powell, Chairman 

Livingston Farrand, M.D. Mary Beard, R.N. Eugene F. DuBois, M.D. 
Barklie McKee Henry Mary M. Roberts, R.N. Anna D. Wolf, R.N. 
G. Canby Robinson, M.D. Flora Rose 



Alumnae Committee of the School of Nursing 

Mary Beard, Chairman Annie W. Goodrich, Vice-Chairman 

Lydia E. Anderson Minnie H. Jordan Anna L. Reutinger 

Irene H. Sutliffe, Honorary Member Lillian D. Wald 

[26] 



OFFICERS OF 
ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY 

Anna D. Wolf, MA., R.N. 

Director of the School of Nursing 
and Director of the Nursing Service 

B.A. Goucher College, 191 1; Diploma in Nursing, The Johns 
Hopkins Hospital School for Nurses, 191 5; M.A. Teachers Col- 
lege, Columbia University, 1916; Robb Fellow, Teachers College, 
Columbia University, 1925-1926; Instructor and Assistant Super- 
intendent of Nurses, The Johns Hopkins Hospital School for 
Nurses, 1916-1919; Instructor of Nursing, Vassar Training Camp 
for Nurses, Summer 191 8; Superintendent of Nurses, Peking 
Union Medical College, Peking, China, 1919-1924; Dean of the 
School of Nursing, ibid., 1924-1925; Associate Professor of Nurs- 
ing and Superintendent of Nurses, The University Clinics, The 
University of Chicago, 1926-1929; Associate Professor of Nursing 
and Director of Nursing, ibid., 1929-1931; Director of the School 
of Nursing and Director of the Nursing Service, New York 
Hospital, 1931-. 

Irene H. Sutliffe ^ t- • o l 1 c 

Directress Emeritus, School of 

Nursing 

Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 
1880; Organized Harmot Hospital, Erie, Pennsylvania; Organized 
School for Nurses, Long Island College Hospital, Brooklyn; 
Directress of Nurses, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 
1 886-1902; Charge of Nursing Service, Camp Black, during 
Spanish-American War; Organized Infantile Paralysis Emer- 
gency Hospital, New York, 191 6; Directress Emeritus, New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; Member of the Society 
of the New York Hospital; Honorary Member of the Alumnae 
Committee of the New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-. 

Lydia E. Anderson. B.A., R.N. c . , T TT . c 

special Lecturer, History ot 

Nursing 

B.A. Rutgers Female College, New York; Diploma in Nursing, 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1897, Part-time Student, 

[27] 



Teachers College, Columbia University, 1909-1910; Assistant 
Superintendent of Nurses, Sloane Maternity Hospital, 1897- 
1902; Private Duty, 1 902-1903; Assistant Superintendent of 
Nurses, Long Island College Hospital School of Nursing, 1903- 
1904; Assistant Superintendent of Nurses, Mount Sinai Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1904-1908; Private Nursing, 1908- 1909; 
Visiting Teacher, thirty-two hospitals in New York and vicinity, 
1910-; Member, State Board of Nurse Examiners, 1910-1927; 
Member, Alumnae Committee, New York Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1932-; Special Lecturer, History of Nursing, New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 193 2-. 

Associate Director, School of Nursing; 

Director, Public Health Nursing 
Diploma in Nursing, St. John's Hospital, Yonkers, 1906; Course 
in Public Health Nursing, Teachers College, Columbia Univer- 
sity, 1915-1916; Assistant Superintendent and Superintendent of 
Nurses, St. John's Hospital, 1908-19 10; Superintendent, Mercer 
Hospital, Trenton, 1913-1915; Director, Department of Instruc- 
tion, Visiting Nurse Society, Philadelphia, 1916-1932; Supervisor, 
Public Health Nursing Department, Pennsylvania School of 
Social and Health Work, 1919-1932; Associate Director, New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; Director, Public Health 
Nursing, ibid., 1932-. 

May Kennedy, M.A., R.N. 

Associate Director, School of Nursing; 

Director of Pedagogy 
Diploma in Nursing, St. Joseph's Hospital, Chicago, 1907; B.S. 
Teachers College, Columbia University, 1917; M.A. University 
of Chicago, 1932; Chief Nurse, Illinois State Hospitals, 1907-1918; 
General Staff Nurse and Chief Nurse, American Expeditionary 
Forces, France, 1918-1919; Superintendent of Nurses, Indian- 
apolis City Hospital, 191 9-1 920; Director of Nursing and Director 
of Illinois State School of Psychiatric Nursing, Illinois Depart- 
ment of Public Welfare, 1920-1932; Lecturer, University of Chi- 
cago, Summer Quarters, 1928-1931; Director of Institutes, 1922-; 
Lecturer, University of Wisconsin, One Semester, 1931-1932; 
Lecturer, De Paul University, Summer Session, 1929; Associate 
Director, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; Director, 
Pedagogy, ibid., 1932-. 

[28I 



ASSISTANT DIRECTORS 
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS AND MEMBERS 
OF OTHER HOSPITAL DEPARTMENTS* 

Katharine G. Amberson, B.S., R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing; 
Head of Medical and Surgical Nursing 
Instruction and Services 

Diploma in Nursing, The Johns Hopkins Hospital School for 
Nurses, 1919; B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1930; 
Night Supervisor, Harriet Lane Home, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 
1919; Assistant Supervisor, Out-Patient Department, ibid., 
1919-1920; General Staff Nurse, Battle Harbor Hospital, Labra- 
dor, Summers, 1919, 1920; General Staff* Nurse, and Head Nurse, 
Rockefeller Institute Hospital, 1920-1923; Superintendent of 
Nurses and Director of Nursing School, Ogden Mills School of 
Nursing, Trudeau Sanatorium, 1 923-1928; Instructor and Execu- 
tive Secretary, Nursing Department, Teachers College, Columbia 
University, 1930-1932; Assistant Director, New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1932-; Head of Medical and Surgical Nursing 
Instruction and Services, New York Hospital, 193 2-. 

Gertrude S. Banfield, B.A., R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing; 
Head of Out-Patient Nursing Instruction 
and Service 

B. A. Vassar, 1918; Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital 
School of Nursing, New York, 1920; Assistant Head Nurse, Medical 
Ward, Presbyterian Hospital, New York, 1920; General Staff Nurse 
and Head Nurse, Out-Patient Department, Peking Union Medi- 
cal College, Peking, China, 1921-1924; Supervisor, Max Epstein 
Clinics, The University of Chicago Clinics, 1927-1931; Assistant 
Director, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; Head of 
Out-Patient Nursing Instruction and Service, New York Hospi- 
*1, !93 2 -- 

^Arranged alphabetically. 

[29] 



Florence Eaton, B.A. 

Director, Nursery School, 
Payne Whitney Clinic 
B.A. Colby, 191 8; Part-time Student, Columbia University, 191 8; 
Student, Longy School of Music, Boston, 1921-1922; Part-time 
Student, Harvard Graduate School of Education and Boston Uni- 
versity, 1923-1924; Diploma, Nursery Training School of Boston, 
1925; Student, Summer Session, London Academy of Music, 1 93 1 ; 
Photographer, New York Public Library, 1918-1919; Instructor, 
Waterville High School, Waterville, Maine, 1920; Director, Cam- 
bridge Nursery School, 1 925-1 932 ; Assistant Director and Director, 
Pre-School Summer Camps, 1924, 1927, 1932; Assistant Director, 
Nursery Training School of Boston, Summer, 1925; Instructor in 
Music, ibid., 1 927-1932; Children's Supervisor, Vassar Summer 
Institute of Euthenics, 1928; Director, Out-Patient Nursery 
School, Payne Whitney Clinic, New York Hospital, 1 932-1933; 
Director, Nursery School, Payne Whitney Clinic, New York 
Hospital, 1 933-. 

S. Margaret Gillam, M.A. 

Director, Department of Nutrition 

Teacher's Diploma, Home Economics, Mechanics Institute, 
Rochester, New York, 191 6; B.S. Teachers College, Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1922; M.A., ibid., 1923; Dietitian, Rochester General 
Hospital, 1918-1919; Superintendent, Woman's Industrial Home, 
Medical Lake, Washington, 1919-1921; Director, Dietetics and 
Housekeeping, University of Michigan Hospital, 1 923-1932; 
Instructor, Institutional Management, Teachers College, Colum- 
bia University, Summers 1924-1930; Instructor, Nutrition, De- 
partment of Public Health and Hygiene, University of Michigan, 
1925-1932; Instructor in Nutrition, Extension Division, ibid., 
1 930; Director, Department of Nutrition, New York Hospital, 
1932-. 

Verda F. Hickcox, B.S., R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing; 
Head of Obstetrical and Gynecological 
Nursing Instruction and Service. 

Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School for Nurses, 
Chicago, 191 6; Certificate of Public Health, Chicago School of 

[30] 



Civics and Philanthropy, 1919; B.S. Teachers College, Columbia 
University, 1927; C. M. B., General Lying-in Hospital and 
School of Midwifery, London, England, 1928; Chief Nurse, 
Longfellow Mining and Accident Hospital, Morenci, Arizona, 
1916-1918; General Staff Nurse, U. S. Army Base Hospital 
No. 13, France, 191 8-1 9 19; Psychiatric Social Worker, Psychi- 
atric Hospital, Dunning, Illinois, 1920; Community Nurse, 
American Red Cross, Morenci, Arizona, 1 920- 1922; Private Duty, 
1 922-1924; General Staff Nurse, University of Wisconsin Hospi- 
tal, 1924-1925; Private Duty, 1925-1926; Supervisor, Visiting 
Nurse Association, York, Pennsylvania, 1927-1928; Instructor 
and Assistant to Director, Brooklyn Maternity Center Associa- 
tion, 1928; Instructor of Midwifery and Supervisor of Obstetrical 
and Gynecological Departments, Siriraj Hospital, Bangkok, 
Siam, 1 929-193 1 ; Consultant Nurse, Maternity, Infancy and Child 
Hygiene, New York State Department of Health, 1931-1932; 
Assistant Director, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; 
Head of Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing Instruction and 
Service, New York Hospital, 193 2-. 

Hannah L. Josephi, R.N. 

Director, Social Service 

Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1901 ; 
Part-time Student, New York School of Philanthropy, 19 13; 
Part-time Student, New School for Social Research, 1931 ; 
Supervisor, Private Patient Floor, New York Hospital, 1901- 
1902; Superintendent, House of Holy Comforter, New York, 
1902-1905; Superintendent of Hospital and Director, Nursing 
Service, Mountainside Hospital, 1907-1909; Director, Social Ser- 
vice, New York Hospital, 191 2-. 

Mary T. McDermott, M.A. 

Director, Nurses' Residence; 

Instructor, Physical Education 
Diploma, Bouve Boston School of Physical Education, 1916; 
Special Courses: Llarvard University, 19 17, 19 19, 1931 ; People's 
College, Denmark, 1926; B.S. New York University, 1930; 
M.A. ibid., 1932; Supervisor, Physical Education, Third Super- 
visory District, Greene County, N. Y., 1915-1918; Supervisor, 
Physical Education, City Schools, Fitchburg, Massachusetts, 
191 8-1 91 9; Supervisor of Playground, Concord, Massachusetts, 

[31] 



1919; Supervisor, Physical Education, City Schools, Revere, 
Massachusetts, 1919-1921; Supervisor of Playground, Brookline, 
Massachusetts, 1921; Director, Recreation and Physical Educa- 
tion, Stockbridge, Massachusetts, 1921-1922; Director, Recrea- 
tion, City of New Haven, 1 922-1924; Director, Physical Educa- 
tion and Health, State Normal School, Fitchburg, Massachusetts, 
1 924- 1 929; Director, Physical Education, Dal ton Experimental 
School, New York, 1930-1931; Assistant Director, Student Ac- 
tivities, New York University, 1931-1932; Instructor, Physical 
Education, ibid., Summer 1932; Instructor, Physical Education, 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 193 2-; Director, Nurses' 
Residence, ibid., 1932-. 

Alice Maud Moffatt, R.N. 

Head of Private Patients' Nursing Service 
Bishop Bethune College, Oshawa, Canada, 1904-1906; Diploma 
in Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 191 2; Private 
Duty, 1912-1915; General Staff Nurse, Hopital Militaire V. R. 
76, France, 1915-1916; Supervisor, Private Patients' Building, 
New York Hospital, 1917-1932; Head ot Private Patients 
Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1932-. 

Sarah E. Moore, R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing; 

Administrative Assistant, Day Nursing Service 
Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 19 13; 
Part-time Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, and 
New York University, 1914, 1926, 1927, 1928; Teacher, Public 
Schools, 1903-1908; Head Nurse, New York Hospital, 1913-1918; 
Instructor, Practical Nursing, New York Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1918-1922; Assistant Directress of Nurses, ibid., 1923- 
1932; Acting Directress of Nurses, ibid., 1932; Administrative 
Assistant, Day Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1932-. 

Bessie A. R. Parker, R.N. 

Administrative Assistant, Evening Nursing 

Service 
Graduate Provincial Normal School, Fredericton, N. B., Canada, 
1905; Diploma in Nursing, Rhode Island Hospital Training School 
for Nurses, Providence, 191 8; Student, Teachers College, Colum- 
bia University, Part-time, 1 932-1934; Teacher, Public Schools, 

[32] 



I905-I9 I 5> Assistant Superintendent of Nurses and Instructor, 
Nursing Practice, Rhode Island Hospital Training School for 
Nurses, 1918-1920; Assistant Superintendent of Nurses and In- 
structor, Nursing Practice, Bridgeport General Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1920-1921; Assistant Superintendent of Nurses and In- 
structor, Nursing Practice, Methodist Episcopal Hospital School 
of Nursing, Brooklyn, 1921-1926; Superintendent of Nurses, 
ibid., 1926-1932; Administrative Assistant, Evening Nursing Ser- 
vice, New York Hospital, 1932-. 

Agnes Schubert, M.S., R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing; 

Head of Pediatric Nursing Instruction 

and Service 
B.S. Northwestern University, 19 17; Diploma in Nursing, West- 
ern Reserve University School of Nursing, 1926; M.S. Teachers 
College, Columbia University, 1932; Supervisor, Babies' and Chil- 
dren's Hospital, Western Reserve University, 1926-1927; Assis- 
tant Instructor and Supervisor, ibid., 1927-1928; Assistant Direc- 
tor, ibid., 1 928-1930; Supervisor and Instructor, Bobs Roberts 
Hospital, The University of Chicago Clinics, 1930-1931; Assistant 
Director, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; Head of 
Pediatric Nursing Instruction and Service, New York Hospital, 
1932-. 

Carolyn A. Sprogell, R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing; 

Director, Psychiatric Nursing 
Diploma in Nursing, St. Lukes Hospital School of Nursing, New 
York, 1924; Post-graduate Course, Psychiatry, Bloomingdale 
Hospital, 1 930; Part-time Student, Teachers College, Columbia 
University, 1929-1934; Head Nurse, Southampton Hospital, 
1924; Night Supervisor, ibid., 1925; Private Duty, 1926; Assistant 
Superintendent and Instructor, Practical Nursing, Southampton 
Hospital, 1 927-1 928; Supervisor, St. Lukes Hospital, New York, 
1929; Assistant Director of Nurses, Bloomingdale Hospital, 
1 930-1 931; Acting Director of Nurses, ibid., 1931-1932; Assistant 
Director, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; Director, 
Psychiatric Nursing, Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic, New 
York Hospital, 193 2-. 

133} 



Gertrude L. Tomlinson, R.N. 

Administrative Assistant, Night Nursing 
Service 

Graduate State Normal School, Mansfield, Pennsylvania, 1905; 
Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1920; 
Public School Teacher, 1905-1917; Directress of Nurses, Bloss- 
burg Hospital, Blossburg, Pennsylvania, 1921-1922; Private Duty, 
1922-1930; Night Supervisor, New York Hospital, 1930-1932; 
Administrative Assistant, Night Nursing Service, New York 
Hospital, 1 932-. 



34 



INSTRUCTORS AND SUPERVISORS* 

Louise Angerstein, B.S. 

Dietitian, Children's Clinic 
B.S. Temple University, 1932; Dietetic Certificate, Montefiore 
Hospital, 1933; Dietitian, Children's Clinic and Milk Formula 
Room, New York Hospital, 1933-. 

Louise M. Aulls, B.S. t>.. . . ,x 7 , ~,. . 

Dietitian, Women s Clinic 

B.S. Florida State College for Women, 1931 ; Dietetic Certificate 
and Graduate Study, University Hospital, University of Michi- 
gan, 1931-1932; Dietitian, Women's Clinic, New York Hospital, 
1 932-. 

Katheryn W. Barbour, R. N. 

Assistant Instructor and Assistant Supervisor, 

Medical Nursing Service 
Student, Cornell University, 1925; Diploma in Nursing, St. 
Mary's Hospital for Children, 1930; Part-time Student, Teachers 
College, Columbia University, 1 931-1934; Supervisor, St. Mary's 
Hospital for Children, 1930-1931; Instructor, Practical Nursing, 
St. Mary's Hospital for Children, 1931-1934; Assistant Instructor 
Nursing Principles and Practice, New York Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1934-; Assistant Supervisor, Medical Nursing, New York 
Hospital, 1 934-. 

June Barnum, R.N. 

Instructor and Assistant Night Supervisor, 
Psychiatric Nursing Service 
Diploma in Teaching, Normal School, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 
1927; Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing, Chicago, 1 93 1; Post-Graduate Course in Psychiatry, Cook 
County Hospital School of Nursing, 1931 ; Part-time Student, 
Teachers College, Columbia University, 1933-1934; Assistant 
Head Nurse, Payne Whitney Clinic, New York Hospital, 1932; 
Assistant Night Supervisor, ibid., 1934-. 

Gertrude Victoria Boquist, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Pediatric 

Nursing Service 
Diploma in Nursing, Lutheran Hospital School of Nursing, 

*Arranged alphabetically. 

1 35] 



Moline, Illinois, 1926; Student, Teachers College, Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1928-1929 and 1931-1932; General Staff Nurse, Obstet- 
rical Service, Research and Educational Hospital, Chicago, 1927; 
General Staff Nurse, Albert Merritt Billings Hospital, The Uni- 
versity of Chicago Clinics, 1927-1928; Head Nurse, Pediatric 
Service, Bellevue Hospital, Summer and Fall, 1929; Supervisor, 
Children's Memorial Hospital, Chicago, 1929-1931; Instructor, 
Pediatric Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 193 2-; 
Supervisor, Pediatric Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 193 2-. 

Henrietta P. Bouton, B.A., R.N. 

Instructor, Medical Social 
Service Principles and Practice 

B.A. Wellesley College, 1906; Diploma in Nursing, New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1921; Student, Columbia University 
Extension Courses, 1924, 1931 ; Instructor, Medical Social Ser- 
vice Principles and Practice, New York Hospital Social Service 
Department, 1933-. 

Halcie M. Boyer, R.N. 

Instructor and Evening Supervisor, 
Medical and Surgical Nursing Service 

Part-time Student, Kansas State Teachers College, 1918-1921; 
Part-time Student, The University of Chicago, 1928-1931; 
Diploma in Nursing, Illinois Training School for Nurses, 1928; 
Post-graduate Course, Chicago Lying-in Hospital, 1930; Teacher, 
Kansas Public Schools, 191 8- 1924; Head Nurse, Woman's Surgi- 
cal Ward, Cook County Hospital, 1928; General Staff Nurse, 
The University of Chicago Clinics, 1928-1931; Supervisor, Ob- 
stetrical Department, and Instructor, Obstetrical Nursing, 
Buffalo Deaconess Hospital, 1931-1932; Instructor, Obstetrical 
Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1 932-1933; Super- 
visor, Labor and Delivery Rooms, New York Hospital, 1 932-1 933; 
Instructor, Medical and Surgical Nursing, New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1933-; Evening Supervisor, Medical and Sur- 
gical Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1933-. 

Caroline Elliot Falls, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Psychiatric 
Out-Patient Nursing Service 

Dipolma in Nursing, The Johns Hopkins Hospital School for 

[36] 



Nurses, 1925; Post-graduate Course, Henry Phipps Psychiatric 
Clinic, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 1925; Part-time Student, Teach- 
ers College, Columbia University, 1929-1934; Student, ibid., 1932; 
Relief Day and Night Supervisor, Henry Phipps Psychiatric 
Clinic, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Summers, 1926, 1927; Psychiatric 
Private Duty, 1926 and 1927; Supervisor, Neurological Clinic, 
Bellevue Hospital, 1927; Relief Supervisor, Training School 
Office and Instructor, Practical Nursing, The Johns Hopkins 
Hospital School for Nurses, 1 927-1928; Head Nurse, Group 
Nursing, Private Floor, Henry Phipps Psychiatric Clinic, Johns 
Hopkins Hospital, 1928-1929; General Staff Nurse, Association 
for Improving Condition of the Poor, New York, 1929- 193 2; 
Instructor, Psychiatric Nursing, New York Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1932-; Supervisor, Psychiatric Out-Patient Nursing 
Service, Payne Whitney Clinic, 1932-. 

Laura Wood Fitzsimmons, R. N. 

Instructor and Night Supervisor, 
Psychiatric Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, The Army School of Nursing, 1926; Part- 
time Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1 933-1934; 
Head Nurse, Walter Reed Hospital, 1 926-1929; Supervisor, Psy- 
chiatric Department, Gallinger Hospital, 1928-1933; Instructor, 
Psychiatric Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 
1 933-; Assistant Night Supervisor, Payne Whitney Clinic, New 
York Hospital, 1933; Night Supervisor, ibid, 1934-. 

Elfletta Elizabeth Geiger, R.N. 

Instructor and Evening Supervisor 
Pediatric Nursing Service 

Student, Illinois Woman's College, 1919-1921; Diploma in Nurs- 
ing, Wesley Memorial Hospital School of Nursing, 1924; Part- 
time Student, University of Chicago, 1926, 1929, 1930; Teachers 
College, Columbia University, 1933-34; Head Nurse, Pediatric 
Nursing Service, W 7 esley Memorial Hospital, 1 925-1927; Supervi- 
sor, Northwestern University Medical Clinic, 1 927-1933; In- 
structor, Pediatric Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing, 93 1 3-; Evening Supervisor, Pediatric Nursing Service, New 
York Hospital, 1933-. 

[37] 



Catherine P. Geuss, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor and Assistant Supervisor, 
Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing Service 

Diploma in Teaching, Northeast Missouri Teachers College, 
1924; Diploma in Nursing, Michael Reese Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1928; Diploma, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Woman's 
Hospital, New York, 1929; Student, University of Chicago, 
1930; B.S. and Diploma in Supervision, Teachers College, Co- 
lumbia University, 1932; Teacher, 191 9-1 924; Head Nurse and 
Instructor, Obstetrical Nursing, Michael Reese Hospital, 1929- 
1930; Supervisor, Surgical Wards, ibid., 1 930- 1 931; Instructor, 
Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing, New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1932-; Assistant Supervisor, Obstetrical and 
Gynecological Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 193 2-. 

Anna H. Gudelsky, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Psychiatric 

Nursing 
Diploma in Nursing, The Army School of Nursing, 1923; Student, 
Public Health, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1923- 
1924; Student, Rollins College, 1927; Charge of Out-Patient 
Clinic, Walter Reed Hospital, 1925; Supervisor, Charles T. 
Miller Hospital, 1926; Private Duty, 1927; Operating Room, 
Flower Hospital, 1928; Supervisor, Psychiatric Institute, Colum- 
bia Medical Center, 1929-1932; Instructor, Psychiatric Nursing, 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; Supervisor, Payne 
Whitney Psychiatric Clinic, New York Hospital, 193 2-. 

Virginia Hague, M.S. 

Instructor, Nutrition 
B.S. Ohio State University, 1926; M.S., Teachers College, 
Columbia University, 1930; Dietetic Certificate, Montefiore 
Hospital, 1930; Instructor, Home Economics, Martel High School, 
Martel, Ohio, 1 926-1928; Dietitian, New York Hospital, 1930- 
1932; Instructor of Nutrition, New York Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1932-. 

Anita M. Jones, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Obstetrical and 
Gynecological Out-Patient Nursing Service 

Student, Ohio Wesleyan University, 1914; Diploma in Nursing, 

[38] 



Massachusetts General Hospital School of Nursing, 1921; B.S. 
Teachers College, Columbia University, 1929; Diploma in Super- 
vision of Public Health Nursing, Teachers College, Columbia 
University, 1929; Public Health Nurse, Madison County, Ohio, 
1921-1923; Director, Turner School of Nursing, Canton, China, 
1 923-1928; Assistant Director, Maternity Center Association, 
New York City, 1 929-1932; Instructor, Obstetrical Nursing, New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; Supervisor, Obstetrical 
and Gynecological Out-Patient Nursing Service, New York Hos- 
pital, 1932-. 

Dorothy Adeline Huey, B.A., B.N., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, 
Medical Nursing Service 
B.A. Smith College, 1926; B.N. Yale University School of Nursing, 
1 93 1; Nurse in Charge, Pediatric Clinic, Syracuse Free Dispen- 
sary, 1 931-1932; Assistant Instructor, Nursing Principles and 
Practice, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-1933; In- 
structor, Medical Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 
1 934-; Supervisor, Medical Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 
1934- 
Edith Kammeyer, R.N. 

Instructor and Night Supervisor, 

Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing Service 

Willamette University, 1 922-1924; Diploma in Nursing, St. 
Mary's School for Nurses, Rochester, Minnesota, 1928; Part-time 
Student, University of Chicago, 1 931 -1932; Post-Graduate Course, 
Obstetrics and Gynecology, Woman's Hospital, New York, 1932- 
1 933; Head Nurse, Lincoln Hospital, Rochelle, Illinois, 1 929-1930; 
Assistant Superintendent of Nurses, Roseland Hospital, Chicago, 
1 930-1 932; Instructor, Obstetrical Nursing, New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1933-; Night Supervisor, Obstetrical and Gyne- 
cological Service, New York Hospital, 1933-. 

Cora E. Kay, R.N. 

Instructor and Evening Supervisor, Medical and 
Surgical Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, St. Luke's Hospital School of Nursing, Chi- 
cago, 1921; Student, University of Minnesota, and Teachers 
College, Columbia University, 1924, 1927, 1929; Part-time 

[39] 



Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1 932-1934; In- 
structor, Practical Nursing, and Supervisor of Wards, Allegheny 
General Hospital, Pittsburgh, 1921-1923; Assistant Superinten- 
dent of Nurses, St. Luke's Hospital School of Nursing, St. Louis, 
1 923-1 926; Instructor, Practical Nursing, St. Luke's Hospital 
School of Nursing, Chicago, 1926- 1927; Superintendent of Nurses, 
Chicago Memorial Hospital, 1927- 1928; Instructor, Practical 
Nursing, and Second Assistant to Superintendent of Nurses, 
Clifton Springs Sanatarium and Clinic, 1929-1932; Instructor, 
Medical and Surgical Nursing, New York Hospital School of 
Nursing, 193 2-; Evening Supervisor, Medical and Surgical Nurs- 
ing Service, New York Hospital, 193 2-. 

Caroline Keller, B.A., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Surgical 
Nursing Service 

B.A. Smith College, 1921; Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian 
Hospital School of Nursing, New York, 1929; Instructor, Miss 
Day's School, New Haven, 1921-1924; Instructor, The Holman 
School, Philadelphia, 1924- 1925; Head Nurse, Surgical Ward, 
New Haven Hospital, 1929-1930; Assistant Supervisor, Surgical 
Nursing, New Haven Hospital, 1 930-1932; Instructor, Surgical 
Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; Super- 
visor, Surgical Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1932-. 

Mary Elizabeth Klein, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Obstetrical 
and Gynecological Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Hahnemann Hospital School of Nursing, 
1 91 6; Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1928; 
Part-time Student, Cleveland College and School of Nursing, 
Western Reserve University, 1930- 193 2; Supervisor, Private 
Hospital, Guayaquil, Ecuador, 1917-1918; Private Duty, 1918- 
1921; Supervisor, Private Floors, Hahnemann Hospital, 1921- 
1925; Supervisor, Operating Rooms, ibid., 1 925-1928; Head 
Nurse, Maternity Hospital, Western Reserve University, 1929- 
1930; Supervisor and Assistant Instructor, ibid., 1930-1932; 
Instructor, Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing, New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; Supervisor, Obstetrical and 
Gynecological Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1932-. 

[40] 



Elizabeth J. Knox, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor and Assistant Director, 
Psychiatric Nursing Service 
Diploma in Nursing, Bloomingdale Hospital School of Nursing, 
1925; B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1928; Super- 
visor, Bloomingdale Hospital, 1925-1926 and 1927-1928; Charge 
of Private Sanatarium, Syracuse, 1929-1930; Instructor and As- 
sistant Director of Nurses, Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1930-1932; Instructor, Psychiatric Nursing, 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1933-; Assistant Director, 
Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic, New York Hospital, 1933-. 

Lucy J. Macdonald, R.N. 

Supervisor, Private Operating Room 

Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1927; 
Part-time Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1927; 
Head Nurse, Surgical Ward, New York Hospital, 1927; Suture 
Nurse, Public Operating Room, ibid, 1928-1931; Supervisor, 
Private Operating Room, ibid., 1932; Head Nurse, Emergency 
Pavilion, New York Hospital, 1932- 1933; Supervisor, Private 
Operating Room, ibid., 1934-. 

Elizabeth Moser, B.A., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Surgical Nursing 

Service 
B.A. Bluffton College, Bluffton, Ohio, 1921; Diploma in Nursing, 
The Johns Hopkins Hospital School for Nurses, 1926; Staff Nurse, 
McCosh Infirmary, Princeton University, 1 927-1929 and 1930- 
193 1 ; Staff Nurse, Anglo-American Nursing Home, Rome, Italy, 
1929-1930; Assistant Superintendent and Instructor, Practical 
Nursing, Palmerton Hospital, Palmerton, Pennsylvania, 1931- 
1932; Instructor, Surgical Nursing, New York Hospital School of 
Nursing, 193 2-; Supervisor, Surgical Nursing Service, New York 
Hospital, 1 932-. 

Grace Conway Nason, R.N. 

Instructor and Night Supervisor, 
Pediatric Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Lynn Hospital School of Nursing, 1927; 

Diploma in Psychiatric Nursing, McLean Hospital School of 

Nursing, 1927; Post-Graduate Course, Pediatrics, Babies' Hospi- 

[41] 



tal, Western Reserve University, 1928; Part-time Student, Teach- 
ers College, Columbia University, 1 932-1 933; Hunter College, 
1 933-1934; Night Supervisor, Marblehead Hospital, 1 927-1928; 
Supervisor and Instructor, Pediatric Nursing Service, Metropoli- 
tan Hospital, 1 929-1 932; Instructor, Pediatric Nursing, New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; Night Supervisor, Pediatric 
Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1932-. 

Winifred I. Patterson, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor and Public Health 
Nurse, Tuberculosis District 
Diploma in Nursing, D. Ogden Mills School of Nursing, 1926; 
B.S. and Diploma in Supervision of Public Health Nursing, 
Teachers College, Columbia University, 1933; General Staff 
Nurse, Hospital of Rockefeller Institute, 1 926-1927; Executive 
Secretary, Columbia County Committee on Tuberculosis and 
Public Health, 1928-1931; Instructor and Public Health Nurse, 
Tuberculosis District, New York Hospital, 1933-. 

Ray, Mrs. B. L., R.N. 

Instructor, Operative Technique and Practice; 
Assistant Supervisor, General Operating Rooms 

Diploma in Nursing, Peter Bent Brigham Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1928; Head Nurse, Private Ward; Assistant Supervisor, 
Operating Rooms; Teaching Supervisor, Operating Rooms, Peter 
Bent Brigham Hospital, 1929-1931; Private Duty, 1931 ; Super- 
visor, Eye Operating Room, Massachusetts Eye & Ear Infirmary, 
1931-1932; Head Nurse, Surgical Supply Room, New York Hospi- 
tal, 1 932-1 933; Instructor, Operative Technique and Practice, 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1933-; Assistant Super- 
visor, General Operating Rooms, New York Hospital, 1933-. 

Elizabeth W. Rogers, Ph.B., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Pediatric Out- 
Patient Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 
Chicago, 1924; Ph.B. The University of Chicago, 1932; School 
Nurse, Daytona Beach Public Schools, 1 926-1 929; General 
Staff Nurse and Head Nurse, Max Epstein Clinics and Pedi- 
atric Out-Patient Department, The University of Chicago Clin- 

[42] 



ics, 1929-1932; Instructor, Pediatric Nursing, New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1932-; Supervisor, Pediatric Out-Patient 
Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 193 2-. 

H. Margaret Rogers, R.N. 

Instructor, Operative Technique; and Supervisor, 

General Operating Rooms 
Diploma in Nursing, The Johns Hopkins Hospital School for 
Nurses, 1923; Private Duty, 1923-1925; Relief Supervisor, Gyne- 
cological Operating Room, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Summer 
1925; Supervisor, Children's Ward, Waterbury Hospital, 1925- 
1926; Assistant Night Supervisor, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Sum- 
mer 1926; Assistant Operating Room Supervisor, ibid., 1926-1929; 
Supervisor, Operating Room, Garfield Memorial Hospital, Wash- 
ington, 1 929-1932; Instructor, Operative Technique, New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; Supervisor, General Operating 
Rooms, New York Hospital, 1932-. 

Ethel M. Sykes, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Pediatric Nursing 

Service 
Teaching Certificate, West Riding Education Department, 
Yorkshire, England, 1921; Student, Geneseo Normal School, 
Summer 1925; Diploma in Nursing, Geneva General Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1929; Part-time Student, Teachers College, 
Columbia University, 1929 and 1933; Part-time Student, Hunter 
College, 1 930; Assistant Infants' Mistress, Westerton Council 
School, Yorkshire, England, 1921-1924; School Teacher, 1925- 
1926; Head Nurse, Medical Ward, Pediatric Department, Belle- 
vue Hospital, 1929; Assistant Teaching Supervisor, Pediatric 
Department, ibid., 1929-1932; Supervisor in Charge, Pediatric 
Department, ibid., 1932-1933; Instructor, Pediatric Nursing 
Service, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1933-; Supervisor, 
Pediatric Service, New York Hospital, 1933-. 

Margery Treiber, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor of Nurseries, 
Obstetrical Nursing Service 
Diploma, Idaho Technical Institute, 1919; Diploma in Nursing, 
Wesley Memorial Hospital School of Nursing, 1922; B.S. Teachers 

[43] 



College, Columbia University, 1927; Private Duty, 1 922-1923 
and 1 924-1 926; General Staff Nurse, St. Luke's Hospital, San 
Francisco, 1923; General Staff Nurse, Pacific Hospital, Los 
Angeles, 1924; Chief Night Nurse, Oregon Short Line Emergency 
Hospital, Pocatello, Idaho, Summers 1 925-1926; Supervisor, 
Pediatric Department, Bellevue Hospital, 1 927-1928; Supervisor 
in Charge, Pediatric Department, ibid., 1 928-1929; Assistant 
Superintendent of Nurses, Reading General Hospital, 1929- 
1930; Supervisor of Wards, ibid., 1930-1932; Instructor, New Born 
Care, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; Supervisor of 
Nurseries, Obstetrical Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 
1 93 2-. 

Jeanette Walters, R.N. 

Instructor and Evening Supervisor, Obstetrical 
and Gynecological Nursing Service 
Diploma in Nursing, Temple University Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing, 1923; Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, Sum- 
mer 1924, 1933, 1934; Post-Graduate Course, Obstetrics,Woman's 
Hospital, New York, 1932; Supervisor, Medical and Surgical 
W T ard, Temple University Hospital, 1 924-1925; Supervisor, 
Babies' Hospital, Philadelphia, 1 926-1928; Assistant Superinten- 
dent, Columbia Hospital, 1928-1929; Supervisor, Obstetrical 
Department, Temple University Hospital, 1930; Instructor, 
Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing, New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, 1932-; Evening Supervisor, Obstetrical and Gyneco- 
logical Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 193 2-. 

Catharine Weiser, M.A., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, 
Surgical Out-Patient Nursing Service 
B.A. Smith College, 1917; Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian 
Hospital School of Nursing, New York, 1920; M.A. Teachers 
College, Columbia University, 1931 ; Reconstruction Work, 
France, 1920-1921; Assistant Supervisor, Visiting Nurse Associa- 
tion, Chicago, 1 923- 1 924; General Staff Nurse and Supervisor, 
Pediatrics, Yale University School of Nursing, 1 924-1926; Super- 
visor, Dispensary, Holyoke Hospital, 1927-1930; Instructor, 
Surgical Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; 
Supervisor, Surgical Out-Patient Nursing Service, New York 
Hospital, 1 932-. 

[44] 



Helen E. Wharton, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Psychiatric Nursing 
Diploma in Nursing, Michael Reese Hospital School of Nursing, 
1930; Student, Teachers College, Columbia University and Field 
Work, Bloomingdale Hospital, 1930-1931; Part-time Student, 
Hunter College, 1 932-1933; Part-time Student, Teachers College, 
Columbia University, 1 933-1934; Night Supervisor, Obstetrics, 
Michael Reese Hospital, 1931-1932; Instructor, Psychiatric Nurs- 
ing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; Supervisor, 
Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic, New York Hospital, 1932-. 

Isabel Willoughby, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Surgical 
and Urological Nursing Service 
Diploma in Nursing, Massachusetts General Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1924; B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 
1932; Head Nurse, Massachusetts General Hospital, 1925; 
Assistant Night Supervisor, Strong Memorial Hospital, 1926; 
Supervisor of Emergency Division, ibid., 1927; Supervisor, Wo- 
man's Surgical Division, ibid., 1928; Private Duty, 1929; Assis- 
tant Principal, Winchester Hospital School of Nursing, 1932; 
Instructor, Surgical and Urological Nursing, New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1933-; Supervisor, Surgical and Urological 
Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1933-. 

Margaret Wyatt, B.A., R.N. 

Instructor, Nursing Principles and Practice 
B.A. Meredith College, 1923; Diploma in Nursing, New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1927; Student, Teachers College, 
Columbia University, Summers 1931, 1932; Instructor and Assis- 
tant to the Dean of Women, Meredith College, 1923-1924; Head 
Nurse, Surgical Ward, New York Hospital, 1 927-1930; Instructor, 
Nursing Principles and Practice, New York Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1930-. 

STUDENT AND STAFF HEALTH 

Evelyn Holt, M.D Physician-in-Charge 

Phyllis Greenacre, M.D Consultant Psychiatrist 

Elsie Davies, R.N Supervisor, Infirmary 

[45] 



ASSISTANT INSTRUCTORS AND 
HEAD NURSES* 

Daisy Amick, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Men's Acute Service, Payne Whitney Clinic 

Marjorie Arehart, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Urological Pavilion 

Vera M. Beach, R.N. 

Head Nurse, Private Patients' Floor 

Mabel Louise Bichy, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Obstetrical Pavilion 

Mrs. Ruby Bohlman, B.A., R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Men's Surgical Pavilion 

Ruth Butler, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Obstetrical Pavilion 

Mildred Colville, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Women's Surgical Pavilion 

Katherine Conklin, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Men's Surgical Pavilion 

Eleanor May Corrigan, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 

Men's Admission Service, Payne Whitney Clinic 

Virginia Daniels, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Isolation Pavilion 



*Arranged alphabetically 

[ 4 6 



Helen M. Daum, B.S., R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Men's Medical Pavilion 

Mrs. Henry Dunning, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Isolation Pavilion 

Cornelia Eckardt, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Women's Acute Service, Payne Whitney Clinic 

Helen H. Eilola, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Obstetrical and Gynecological Isolation Pavilion 

Alice Fogg, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Labor and Delivery Rooms 

(Catherine Fopeano, B.S., R.N. 
Assistant Instructor and Evening Charge Nurse, 
Labor and Delivery Rooms 

• Elizabeth Harmon, B.A., R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Surgical Pavilion 

Mildred L. Harrington, R.N. 

Head Nurse, Private Patients' Floor 

Thirza Hills, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
W 7 omen's Surgical Pavilion 

Dorothy Hobart, B.S., R.N. 

Head Nurse, Semi-Private Patients' Floor 

Mildred Jensen, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Obstetrical and Gynecological Operating Rooms 

Margit Johnson, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Emergency Pavilion 

[4-] 



Margaret Joinville, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 

Women's Admission Service, Payne Whitney Clinic 

Margaret Kelly, R.N. 

Head Nurse, Pediatric Metabolic Unit 

Mrs. Alice Kohler, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Surgical Supply Room 

Elizabeth Viola Kribs, R.N. 

Head Nurse, Private Patients' Floor 

Margaret Landes, R.N. 

Head Nurse, Semi-Private Patients' Floor 

Veronica Lyons, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Obstetrical Pavilion 

Christine MacLeod, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Private Obstetrical Pavilion 

Elizabeth M. McLowd, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Private Gynecological Pavilion 

Ethel MacKay, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Metabolism Pavilion 

Effie Nelson, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 

Women's Convalescent Service, Payne Whitney Clinic 

Rose Novak, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Night Charge Nurse, 
Labor and Delivery Rooms 

Catherine Riesley, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 

Women's Convalescent Service, Payne Whitney Clinic 

[48] 



Jane Rogers, R.N. 
Helen Schumann, R.N. 
Mildred Stone, R.N. 



Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Pediatric Pavilion 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Urological Pavilion 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Pediatric Pavilion 



Dorothy Vernstrom, R.N. 



Myrna Wight, R.N. 



Rosamond Young 



Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Women's Medical Pavilion 



Head Nurse, Private Patients' Floor 

Assistant Instructor, Physical Education 
Assistant Director, Nurses' Residence 



ASSISTANTS IN ADMINISTRATION 



Flora Josephine Bergstrom, R.N. 
Dorothy Jacobus, B.A. 
Mrs. Evelyn McGowan, B.A. 
Marian Welton 



Librarian 

Secretary-Registrar 

Secretary 

Secretary 



49 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY MEDICAL COLLEGE 
FACULTY AND OTHERS PARTICIPATING IN 

INSTRUCTION 

Philip B. Armstrong, M.D.* 

Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

George W. Wheeler, M.D. 

Assistant Professor of Bacteriology 

Ralph G. Stillman, M.D. 

Assistant Professor of Clinical Pathology 

Ruth Thomas, A.B., C.P.H. 

Instructor, Applied Bacteriology 

Harry Grundfest, M.D. 

Assistant Professor of Physiology 



Eugene F. DuBois, M.D., and Staff 

Professor of Medicine 

Henricus J. Stander, M.D., and Staff 

Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Samuel Z. Levine, M.D., and Staff 

Acting Professor of Pediatrics 

George S. Amsden, M.D., and Staff 

Professor of Psychiatry 

George S. Heuer, M.D., and Staff 

Professor of Surgery 



R. C. Redden, M.D. 

Director, First Aid, American Red Cross 

Camille Gaute 

Instructor of Massage 

Mary T. Whitley, Ph.D. 

Professor of Psychology, Teachers College, Columbia University 
*On leave of absence. 

[50] 



MEMBERS OF AFFILIATING ORGANIZATIONS 

Hazel Corbin, R.N. 

General Director Maternity Center Association 

Margaret A. Wales, M.A., R.N. 

General Director of Nursing 

Visiting Nurse Service, Henry Street Settlement 

Mrs. Ellen G. MacDowall, R.N. 

Medical Social Supervisor, 

Greenwich House Settlement 



51 



THE SOCIETY OF THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 



THE 

NEW YORK HOSPITAL 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 



Supplementary Announcement 

GRADUATE COURSES 

1934-1935 



VOLUME III NUMBER 1 



GENERAL STATEMENT 

THE New York Hospital School of Nursing offers to 
graduate nurses courses in Obstetrical and Gynecologi- 
cal Nursing, Psychiatric Nursing, Surgical Nursing and 
Operating Room Management. These courses are designed 
for nurses desiring a broader basic preparation in one spe- 
cific branch of clinical nursing and for those who are seek- 
ing information and experience in the modern methods of 
care and treatment. 

The Faculty and Facilities for Study 

Instruction is given by the faculties of the New York 
Hospital School of Nursing and the Cornell Medical 
College. The Clinical Departments of the New York Hos- 
pital, the Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic and the Lying- 
in Hospital, integral parts of the New York Hospital, offer 
splendid opportunities for practice in the selected fields. 
The Hospital has a capacity of eight hundred and forty- 
seven beds for acutely ill patients and one hundred and 
twenty-five bassinettes for newborn infants, with approxi- 
mately one hundred and twenty-five operations weekly and 
an active out-patient department for the study of ambula- 
tory patients. 

The library of the School of Nursing contains about one 
thousand volumes besides pamphlets on medicine, nursing 
and allied subjects as well as current publications. The 
Cornell Medical College library is available to students of 
the nursing school. In addition to these main libraries there 
are departmental libraries on the various floors of the 
hospital. 

Matriculation Requirements 

An applicant for admission should be between the ages 
of twenty-two and thirty-five, a graduate of a high school 
of good standing and of an accredited school of nursing. 
She must also be a registered nurse and present evidence of 
personal and professional fitness for the special type of 
nursing for which she has applied. Arithmetic with 



emphasis upon ratio, percentage and the metric system 
should be reviewed before admission. 

In addition to the general requirements for admission an 
applicant for the course in Operating Room Management 
will be required to present evidence of the following: 

1. Satisfactory completion of not less than six weeks 
experience in a general operating room while an under- 
graduate student. 

2. Experience preferably as a head nurse or assistant 
head nurse within the two years previous to submitting 
application or satisfactory completion of graduate study 
including such courses as ward management, ward teaching 
or supervision in nursing. 

3. Graduation from a school of nursing within five 
years. 

Concerning Admission 

Applications for admission should be addressed to the 
Director of the School of Nursing, 525 East Sixty-eighth 
Street, New York, New York, and should be sent as early 
as possible preceding the term in which the applicant de- 
sires to enter the school. 

Admission dates are as follows: Obstetrical and Gyne- 
cological Nursing and Psychiatric Nursing — October 1, 
February 1 and June 1 ; Surgical Nursing and Operating 
Room Management — January 1, March 1, May 1, July 1, 
September 1 and November 1. 

Registration is always on the day preceding the date of 
admission. If the registration date falls on a Sunday the 
date is changed automatically to the Saturday preceding 
and admission to the school is changed to Sunday. 

Health Regulations 
Each applicant is required to present evidence of physical 
fitness before admission. She should have had smallpox 
vaccination within the past seven years and typhoid inocu- 
lation within the past three years. Each student registered 
for obstetrics is required to have had a negative Schick test 
and a report of a Dick test; immunization for positive 
Schick test is obligatory. An applicant registering for this 

[3] 



course is also required to present a report of two successive 
negative throat cultures for streptococcus hemolyticus taken 
within two weeks prior to the date of admission. Another 
throat culture will be taken on arrival at the school and 
subsequently as indicated. 

The School of Nursing maintains a health service for all 
students. A limited number of days care for acute illness 
will be given either in the infirmary or the hospital. Chronic 
and prolonged acute illnesses cannot be cared for at the 
expense of the school. 

Expense 

The School of Nursing provides each student with room, 
board and laundry and gives a monthly allowance of ten 
dollars. This maintenance and stipend are considered a 
working scholarship. 

A matriculation fee of ten dollars, a health service fee of 
five dollars and a house activity fee of fifty cents for six 
months or less are required of each student at the time of 
registration. These fees are not refundable. 

Each student is required to purchase note-books, nursing 
manuals and metric system cards costing approximately two 
dollars and fifty cents. 

Each student must provide her own uniform and should 
wear the graduate or the student uniform, with cap, of her 
own school. Low heeled shoes with rubber tips must be 
worn. 

Curriculum 

Each department has a special curriculum, a description 
of which follows. The schedule includes theory and prac- 
tice with conferences and case studies amounting approxi- 
mately to fifty-two hours per week day and fifty-six hours 
per week night. A maximum of four weeks of evening or 
night duty may be required. The students are required to 
attend classes, to do assigned reference reading, to write 
case studies and special term papers and to participate in 
class discussion. 

At the end of the course if the student has satisfactorily 
met all requirements a transcript of her record of scholastic 

[4] 



achievement in class and nursing practice will be given to 
her. A fee of one dollar is charged for each additional 
transcript. 

Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing 

Advisor: Verda Hickcox, B.S., R.N. 
Head of Obstetrical and 
Gynecological Nursing 
Instruction and Service. 
Basic Course 

This course is designed for the graduate nurse who de- 
sires a knowledge of newer methods in obstetrical and 
gynecological nursing, and to increase her skill in the care 
of the obstetrical and gynecological patient. 

Lectures, clinics, demonstrations, and conferences 60 hours 

Nursing 130. Obstetrics and Gynecology .... 44 hours 
Nursing 131. Principles of Obstetrical and Gyne- 
cological Nursing 16 hours 

Nursing Practice 

Nursing 135. Practice in Obstetrical and Gyneco- 
logical Nursing 4 months 

Advanced Course 

Students of at least one year's satisfactory experience in 
nursing and having personal qualifications of maturity, 
physical health, and definiteness of purpose may register for 
a second period of advanced study upon recommendation of 
the faculty of the department and approval of the Com- 
mittee on Admissions. 

Lectures and conferences 75 hours 

Required : 

Nursing 190. Ward Management 30 hours 

Nursing 191. Ward Teaching 30 hours 

Health Nursing 150. Social and Economic Aspects 

of Health and Disease 15 hours 

Electives : 

Electives may be chosen from the following: 

Nursing 192. Supervision in Schools of Nursing . 30 hours 

[5] 



Nursing 183. Operative Technique 10 hours 

Health Nursing 151. Community Health . . . 15 hours 

Psychology 170. Elementary Psychology. . . . 30 hours 
Psychology 171. Development of Behavior of 

Children 30 hours 

Psychology 172. Deviate Behavior 15 hours 

Nursing 162. Mental Hygiene 15 hours 

Nursing 160a. Psychiatry 20 hours 

Nursing Practice 
Required : 

Nursing 136. Practice in Ward Administration and Ward 

Teaching 4 months 

Psychiatric Nursing 

Advisor: Carolyne A. Sprogell, R.N. 

Director of Psychiatric Nursing 
Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic 
Basic Course 

This course is designed for the graduate nurse who de- 
sires knowledge of the underlying organic, functional, and 
social causes of mental illness, and the opportunity to ac- 
quire understanding of the technique and skill in the care 
of mental patients. 

Lectures, clinics, and conferences 225 hours 

The first four months: 

Psychology 1 70. Elementary Psychology .... 30 hours 
Psychology 172. Psychology of Deviate Behavior 15 hours 

Nursing 160a. Psychiatry 20 hours 

Nursing 161a. Principles of Psychiatric Nursing 40 hours 

Nursing 162. Mental Hygiene 15 hours 

Nursing 163. Principles of Special Therapeutics . 15 hours 

The second four months: 

Health Nursing 150. Social and Economic Aspects 

of Health and Disease . 15 hours 
Psychology 171. Development of Behavior of 

Children 30 hours 

Nursing 160b. Psychiatry 15 hours 

Nursing 161b. Principles of Psychiatric Nursing 30 hours 

Nursing Practice 

Nursing 165. Practice in Psychiatric Nursing 8 months 

[6] 



Advanced Course 

Students who have attained a high scholastic standing 
and have manifested a special interest and marked ability 
in the care of the psychiatric patient and who wish to pre- 
pare themselves for positions in psychiatric hospitals may 
register for an advanced period of four months study in 
psychiatric nursing. 

Lectures, clinics, demonstrations, and conferences 90 hours 

Nursing 164. Principles of Advanced Psychiatric 

Nursing 30 hours 

Nursing 190. Ward Management 30 hours 

Nursing 191. Ward Teaching 30 hours 

Nursing Practice 

Nursing 166. Practice in Advanced Psychiatric Nursing . 4 months 

Surgical Nursing 

Advisor: Katharine G. Amberson, B.S., R.N. 

Head of Medical and Surgical Nursing 
Instruction and Service 

This course is designed for graduate students desiring a 
broader background in surgical nursing, and to acquaint 
them with the more modern methods of surgical treatment 
of diseases. The course is limited to eight students admitted 
every two months. 

Lectures, clinics, demonstrations, and conferences 65 hours 

Nursing 180. Surgery 25 hours 

Nursing 181. Principles of Surgical Nursing . . 25 hours 
Health Nursing 150. Social and Economic Aspects 

of Health and Disease . 15 hours 

Nursing Practice 

Nursing 185. Practice in Surgical Nursing 4 months 

Note: A period of two additional months practice may be arranged for 
a limited number of students who have demonstrated their in- 
terest and fitness for the field chosen. In only one of these two 
months will it be possible to arrange for additional experience 
in the operating room. 

[7] 



Operating Room Management 

This course, covering a period of six months, is planned 
to prepare a limited number of especially qualified nurses 
to become head nurses or assistant supervisors in a general 
operating room. 

Lectures, clinics, demonstrations, and conferences 90 hours 

Required : 

Nursing 183. Operative Technique 10 hours 

Nursing 184. Operating Room Management and 

Supervision 20 hours 

Electives : 

Nursing 180. Surgery 25 hours 

Nursing 181. Principles of Surgical Nursing . . 25 hours 

Nursing 162. Mental Hygiene 15 hours 

Psychology 172. Psychology of Deviate Behavior . 15 hours 
Health Nursing 150. Social and Economic Aspects 

of Health and Disease . 15 hours 

Nursing 190. Ward Management 30 hours 

Nursing 191. Ward Teaching 30 hours 

Nursing 192. Supervision in Schools of Nursing 30 hours 

Nursing Practice 
Required : 

Nursing 186. Practice in Operating Room Tech- 
nique and Management 6 months 

Description of Courses 
Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing 

Nursing 130. Obstetrics and Gynecology 44 hours 

This course deals with the physiological and pathological changes dur- 
ing pregnancy, labor, and the puerperium; the care of the normal 
newborn ; the nutrition of the mother and baby ; the prevention of 
complications; the social significance of infant and maternal 
mortality; the relation of obstetrics to various gynecological condi- 
tions; the results of infection and tumor growth and the required 
surgical interference and operative treatment. 

Lectures and clinics Dr. Stander and staff, Miss Aulls 

Nursing 131. Principles of Obstetrical and 

Gynecological Nursing 16 hours 

[8] 



This course emphasizes the importance of prenatal instruction, obser- 
vation, and care ; obstetrical and gynecological nursing procedures 
with particular attention to infections and their special therapy. 

Lectures, demonstrations, and conferences: Miss Hickcox, Miss Klein, 

Miss Treiber, Miss Geuss. 

Nursing 135. Practice in Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing, 4 months 
This consists of supervised practice in the nursing procedures involved 
in the care of mothers and infants in the wards, nurseries, labor and 
delivery rooms, and the out patient department. In connection with 
the practice the student will write case studies, prepare papers on 
special subjects, and participate in conferences. 

Miss Hickcox, Miss Klein, Miss Treiber, 
Miss Geuss, and staff. 

Nursing 136. Practice in Ward Administration and 

Ward Teaching 4 months 

Supervised practice in assisting the head nurse in the administration of 
the ward and the conduct of the ward teaching program, with 
emphasis on the particular field in which the student expects to 
function. 

Miss Hickcox and staff. 

Health Nursing 

Health Nursing 150. Social and Economic Aspects of Health 

and Disease 15 hours 

A course of study dealing w 7 ith the prevention of sickness and the 
promotion of health, with emphasis upon the social factors in the 
home and in the communty. 

Lectures and conferences Miss I r rost 

Health Nursing 151. Community Health 15 hours 

This course considers the aims and scope of public health activities 

and the part of the nurse in this program. The relationship between 

the hospital and other health and social agencies of the community 

is emphasized. 

Lectures and conferences Miss Frost 

Psychiatric Nursing 

Nursing 160a-160b. Psychiatry 35 hours 

This course deals with psychopathic conditions, their prevalence, social 
aspects, etiology, pathology, treatment, and prevention. 

Lectures and clinics Dr. Amsden, Dr. Henry, 

Dr. Tiebout, and staff. 
Nursing 161a-161b. Principles of Psychiatric Nursing .... 70 hours 
This course deals with the basic principles in the nursing care of 

\9] 



psychiatric patients and the nursing procedures used in their treat- 
ments. Emphasis is placed upon the relation between mental and 
physical illness and the effects of child behavior on future adult life. 
Lectures, clinics, demonstrations, and conferences: 

Miss Sprogell, Miss Knox, and staff. 

Nursing 162. Mental Hygiene 15 hours 

A course of study designed to acquaint the student with the origin, 
development, and growth of the mental hygiene movement, em- 
phasizing the need and importance for ps}^chiatric clinics, child 
guidance clinics and community education. 

Lectures . . . Dr. Greenacre and staffs of Out Patient Department, 
Social Service and Nursery School. 

Nursing 163. Principles of Special Therapeutics 15 hours 

This course gives the student an understanding of the use of occupa- 
tional therapy and physiotherapy in the care of mentally ill patients. 
Lectures and conferences . . . . Miss Gunderson, Miss Hibbler, 

and Mr. Lawson. 

Nursing 164. Principles of Advanced Psychiatric Nursing . . 30 hours 
A course designed for those students who have had the basic course, 
and who wish to study special projects in psychiatric nursing. Stu- 
dents will prepare special behavior studies to be presented at student 
conferences. 

Clinics and conferences Miss Sprogell and staff. 

Nursing 165. Practice in Psychiatric Nursing 8 months 

This course consists of supervised practice in the care of the psychiatric 
patient, which includes experience in the special departments as: 
out patient department, adults and children, occupational, recrea- 
tional and hydrotherapy departments. It also includes a period of 
supervised observation and practice in the Payne Whitney Nursery 
School. 

Miss Sprogell, Miss Knox, and staff. 

Nursing 166. Practice in Advanced Psychiatric Nursing . . . 4 months 
This course includes supervised practice in assisting the head nurse in 
the administration of the floor, and assisting in the conduct of the 
ward teaching program. 

Miss Sprogell and staff. 

Psychology 

Psychology 170. Elementary Psychology 30 hours 

An introduction to the study of human behavior and the underlying 
principles of mental adjustments and habit formation. An effort 
will be made to apply this study to the adjustment of the student 

[10] 



to her environment and to the better understanding of the adjust- 
ment of patients to their illnesses. 

Lectures and conferences Miss Kennedy. 

Psychology 171. Development of Behavior of Children . . . 30 hours 

A study of the normal child and his behavior. The susceptibility of 
the child's behavior responses to the various details of family life 
and of school will be emphasized. 

Lectures and conferences Professor Whitley. 

Psychology 172. Psychology of Deviate Behavior 15 hours 

A study of human behavior from the physiological, sociological and 
psychological viewpoints. Special attention is given to conflicts and 
adjustment mechanisms. Students are required to make special 
application of class discussion to their ward experiences. 

Lectures and conferences Miss Kennedy. 

Surgical Nursing 

Nursing 180. Surgery 25 hours 

This course includes a brief survey of a number of the special fields in 
surgery and the more recent developments in the surgical treatment 
of diseases. Emphasis is placed upon signs, symptoms, and observa- 
tions which should be made both preceding and following operations 
as well as upon essential points related to the physical care of the 
patient. 

Lectures and clinics Dr. Heuer and staff. 

Nursing 181. Principles of Surgical Nursing 25 hours 

This course treats of the principles underlying the nursing care of 
surgical patients and affords an opportunity for observation and 
discussion of new ways of applying these principles. 
Lectures, demonstrations, and conferences: 

Miss Amberson, Miss Moser, 
Miss Keller, Miss Willoughby. 

Nursing 185. Practice in Surgical Nursing 4 months 

Supervised practice is provided in the following services: general sur- 
gery, urology, out patient, general operating room. 

Miss Amberson, Miss Banfield, Miss Moser, 
Miss Keller, Miss Willoughby, Miss Boyer, 
Miss Kay, Miss Rogers and staff. 

Nursing 183. Operative Technique 10 hours 

Students are introduced to the duties involved in circulating during 
operations and while assisting as a clean nurse at the operating table. 
They also observe the induction of undergraduate students. 

Demonstrations and conferences Miss Rogers, Mrs. Ray, 

and Miss Jensen. 

mi 



Nursing 184. Operating Room Management and Supervision . 20 hours 
This course deals with the care and ordering of supplies and the care 
of rooms. It includes discussions related to organization of the 
department, estimations of needed personnel, arranging of schedules 
of cases and hours of work, assignment of duties and participation 
in the plans for student teaching and the general supervision of the 
operating suite. 

Conferences Miss Rogers and Mrs. Ray. 

Nursing 186. Practice in Operating Room Technique and 

Management 6 months 

The practice in operating room management includes observation, cir- 
culation, assisting at the operating table, night service, and responsi- 
bility for one operating room. The student will also have experience 
in assisting with student teaching and the general administration of 
all of the general operating rooms. 

Miss Rogers and Mrs. Ray. 

Nursing 190. Ward Management 30 hours 

This course deals with the practical aspects of ward administration. 
The first half of the course will be devoted to the physical unit, its 
equipment, care and replenishment. The second half of the course 
is concerned with the organization of personnel and relationships 
within and without the unit. Students make application of class- 
room discussion to the specific field in which they are interested. 

Lectures and conferences Miss Kennedy. 

Nursing 191. Ward Teaching 30 hours 

This course deals with the principles of learning and teaching and 
emphasizes learning activities and teaching methods. The confer- 
ence method is analysed and studied as the chief method in ward 
teaching. Students prepare lesson plans and demonstrate this method 
of instruction. 

Lectures and conferences Miss Kennedy. 

Nursing 192. Supervision in Schools of Nursing 30 hours 

This course considers supervision from the administrative and educa- 
tional aspects. The principles of inspection, teaching, guidance, and 
research as they relate to supervision in schools of nursing are dis- 
cussed. The student plans programs of supervision in her special 
field and selects one subject for research to cover a four months 
period. 
Lectures and conferences Miss Kennedy. 



[12] 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS OF THE 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Anna D. Wolf, M.A., R.N. 

Director of the School of Nursing, 
Director of the Nursing Service. 

Irene H. Sutliffe, R.N. 
Directress Emeritus. 

Harriet Frost, R.N. 

Associate Director, School of Nursing, 
Director, Public Health Nursing. 

May Kennedy, M.A., R.N. 

Associate Director, School of Nursing, 
Director of Pedagogy. 

Katharine G. Amberson, B.S., R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing, 

Head of Medical and Surgical Nursing Instruction and Services. 

Gertrude S. Banfield, B.A., R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing, 

Head of Out Patient Nursing Instruction and Services. 

Verda F. Hickcox, B.S., R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing, 

Head of Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing Instruction 
and Services. 

Sarah E. Moore, R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing, 
Administrative Assistant, Nursing Service. 

Agnes Schubert, M.A., R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing, 

Head of Pediatric Nursing Instruction and Service. 

Carolyne A. Sprogell, R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing, 
Director of Psychiatric Nursing, 
Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic. 

Dorothy Jacobus, B.A. 
Secretary-Registrar. 

f 13 1 



THE 
NEW YORK HOSPITAL 

A CITY OF HEALING 




THE NEW YORK. HOSPITAL SOUTH VIEW 



THE 
NEW YORK HOSPITAL 

A CITY OF HEALING 



A REPORT ON PROGRESS 

BY 

THE SOCIETY OF THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 

*935 







THE MAIN ENTRANCE HALL 



Foreword 

The Society of the New York Hospital, chartered 
June 13, 1 77 1, includes in its group: 

New York Hospital — 1771 

Lying-In Hospital — 1799 

Bloomingdale Hospital for Mental Diseases 
— 1821 

Nursery and Child's Hospital — 1823 

New York Hospital School of Nursing — 1877 

Manhattan Maternity and Dispensary — 1905 

Convalescent Hospital for Children — 1907 

Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic — 1932 

The history and purposes of the Hospital and its 
plan of organization were discussed in a pamphlet 
issued during 193 i, entitled "The New York Hos- 
pital — Its Program." Now that the Hospital has 
occupied its new home for nearly three years, the 
Board of Governors believe that an account of aims 
and accomplishments therein will be of interest to 
many who received the preliminary announcement. 



The Society of the New York Hospital 

Governors 

Wilson M. Powell President 

Bronson Winthrop Treasurer 

Augustine J. Smith Secretary 

Henry W. deForest R. Horace Gallatin 

Charles S. Brown Joseph H. Choate, Jr. 

Henry G. Barbey Frank L. Polk 

Cornelius N. Bliss John Hay Whitney 

Paul Tuckerman William Vincent Astor 

William Woodward George F. Baker 

Arthur Iselin Barklie McKee Henry 

G. Beekman Hoppin Langdon P. Marvin 

Lewis Cass Ledyard, Jr. H. Williamson Pell 

George T. Bowdoin 



City of Healing 

The greatest achievements of humanity, it is said, 
are brought about by men who dream great dreams 
and then, with inspired persistence, work to make 
them come true. 

The city of healing which now soars so gracefully 
above the river front between East Sixty-eighth and 
Seventy-first Streets is the physical manifestation of 
one such dream. It is the home of the New York 
Hospital. 

Viewed from a Sound steamer, from the Queens- 
borough Bridge, from a York Avenue bus, from an 
elevated train, from a midtown office window, the 
combined mass and grace of the buildings force them- 
selves irresistibly on the attention. One is scarcely 
surprised these structures gained for their archi- 
tects the gold medal of the Architectural League. 

The dream which is crystallized in these buildings 
is as yet only partially fulfilled. Perhaps it will 
never be wholly fulfilled. It is a dream of ideal serv- 
ice to suffering human beings in a plant which com- 
bines within its walls, care of the sick, medical teach- 
ing and research, and where all branches of medicine 
and surgery work in cooperation. 

The attempt to bring that ideal to pass is the real 
New York Hospital, for which the new group of 
buildings, beautiful though it is, is only a shell. 

[ 5 ] 



The new plant, opened September i, 1932, houses 
a group of hospitals which operate as a unit. The 
component institutions are all completely controlled 
by one board. 

The general hospital building, occupying the cen- 
tral structure which dominates the group, houses the 
medical and surgical pavilions, the private patients' 
pavilion, the out-patient department, the central 
laboratories, the living quarters of the resident staff, 
and the offices of administration. 

Along the East River this building is flanked by 
three special hospital buildings: the Woman's Clinic, 
the Children's Clinic, and the Payne Whitney Psy- 
chiatric Clinic. On York Avenue the central build- 
ing is joined to the buildings of Cornell University 
Medical College. 

To the north, across Seventieth Street, is the resi- 
dence of the School of Nursing, and the power and 
service building of the group. 

A Few Statistics 

In 1934 a total of 64,010 patients were treated at 
the Hospital receiving 244,9 14 days °^ bed care and 
making 172,586 visits to the out-patient and acci- 
dent departments for examination and treatment. A 
staff of 2,662 doctors, nurses and employees worked 
to provide these patients with care. The Hospital 

[ 6] 



COMPARATIVE STATISTICS FOR 

1933 and 1934 



1933 

Total Beds in Operation. . 671 

Bassinets 131 

Pavilion Bed Occupancy. . 83% 

Private Bed Occupancy.. . 46% 

Bed Patients 14,325 

Days' Care 213,502 

Out-Patient Visits 203,603 

Out-Patients 33,549 

Accident and Admitting 

Ward Visits 13,788 

Laboratory Examinations. 90,556 

X-ray Examinations 22,669 

Physical Therapy Treat- 
ments 27,844 

Prescriptions Filled 46,347 

Pavilion Patient Cost Per 

Day 37.12 

Operating Expenditures... 32,258,244.60 

Operating Income (Excl. of 

Income on Investments) 31,026,723.69 

Operating Deficit 31,231,520.91 

Net Deficit 3768,656.42 



1934 


Increase or 

Decrease 

During 

1934 


862 


191 


162 


31 


85% 


2% of total 


59% 


13% of total 


16,606 


2,281 


244,912 


31,410 


219,257 


15,654 


38,444 


4,895 


18,546 


4,758 


100,269 


9,713 


25,816 


3,147 


32,117 


4,147 


42,847 


3,500 



37.21 30.09 

32,390,697.87 3132,453.27 

31,337,878.34 3311,154.65 

31,052,819.53 3178,701.38 
Decrease 



3756,455.03 



36,201.39 
Decrease 



[ 7 ] 



served 1,705,341 meals during the year. Itsbusserv- 
ice carried 882,409 passengers to and from the Hos- 
pital. A total of 1 28,5 1 9 laboratory tests and X-ray 
examinations were made in caring for patients. The 
Hospital's cost of operation was $2,390,697.87. 

Care of the Sick 

So much for figures. Perhaps they are impressive ; 
but the Hospital's distinguishing feature is the qual- 
ity of care it provides for its patients. 

Because this is a teaching hospital, the care of each 
patient becomes an effort to demonstrate the ideal 
treatment of the particular trouble from which he is 
suffering. This means constant study of the patient's 
individual and personal problems not only at the bed- 
side but in staff conference rooms and laboratories. 

More than that the Hospital, following a trend 
which has characterized its whole history, directs 
attention to the whole personality of the sick man and 
the place of his mentality in the nature of his illness. 

The Pavilion System 

The Hospital's new home has no barrack-like 
wards. It operates on the pavilion system. A pavilion 
includes approximately twenty-nine beds occupying 
one wing of a floor. Glass partitions divide these beds 
into groups of four, and there is provision for curtain- 
ing off each one separately. Every pavilion is virtu- 

[ 8 ] 



ally a small hospital in itself with its own large sun- 
room, nursing staff, and special service facilities. 

When the new buildings were opened, only 651 
beds were put into operation. This number has since 
been increased to 879, plus 162 bassinets, a total 
of 1,041. During the last year, five new pavilions 
were opened in the Hospital, so that there only re- 
main 120 beds yet to be opened. Of the beds now 
open, 563 are for pavilion patients, 78 for semi- 
private patients, 150 for private patients, and 88 are 
for psychiatric patients. More than seventy-five per 
cent of the patients admitted last year were cared for 
in the public pavilions. 

Special Services 
Two entire floors of the Hospital are given over 
to operating rooms of the latest design, and additional 
operating rooms are provided in the Lying-in Hos- 
pital. An entire wing is set aside for special therapies, 
including a large pool in which the crippled may 
exercise their arms and legs as in natural warm 
springs, and great sunlamps whose rays promote more 
rapid healing of surgical conditions. Every foot of 
roof space has been designed for use, making it pos- 
sible for patients to enjoy the open air and the view 
while they are recovering. 

The Medical Organization 
In building up its present staff the Hospital has 

[ 9 ] 



been able to attract many physicians and surgeons 
who are recognized as distinguished leaders in their 
fields. 

The staff organization is a combination of the full- 
time system, under which salaried staff doctors de- 
vote all their time to the institution's work, and the 
part-time system, under which men give part of their 
time to the Hospital's work but support themselves 
by private practice. Each of the Hospital's main 
divisions is headed by a full-time chief. Approxi- 
mately 80 per cent of the staff, which includes more 
than 400 doctors, is made up of leaders in private 
practice. 

All of the full-time and most of the part-time 
staff are members of the faculty of Cornell University 
Medical College. This means that for every patient 
of the Hospital there is available the same high order 
of knowledge and ability that is required of a medical 
school professor. 

Higher Education in Medicine 

More than at any time in its whole history, the 
New York Hospital is today a "university of medi- 
cine." 

Not only does the Hospital provide clinical teach- 
ing facilities for the students of Cornell University 
Medical College, but also for those who seek the 

do] 



highest type of graduate education in medicine. It 
attracts as interns leading graduates from many 
medical schools. From this group the Hospital selects 
approximately sixty men who, as Assistant Residents 
and Residents on full-time service, spend from two 
to eight years of advanced training in medicine, 
surgery or the specialties. Such long and intensive 
training can scarcely be required for the medical pro- 
fession as a whole; but it is needed for the develop- 
ment of leaders in teaching, in research and in the 
practice of the specialties. 

Research 

The number of patients any one doctor can ob- 
serve personally is limited. Through the record 
system the research worker is able to profit by ex- 
perience in many thousands of cases including rare 
cases which are invaluable to a better understanding 
of disease. In 1934 alone, 41,000 new records were 
made. Through more than 200 diagnostic and re- 
search laboratories in the Hospital and the College, 
the research worker has the means of attacking, 
either directly or with the cooperation of others, any 
physical, chemical or bacteriological problem related 
to the conquest of disease. 

Research is conducted in all departments. Every 
member of the staff devotes some time to systematic 
studies of the cause, treatment, cure or prevention of 

["3 



disease. The following are a few general examples 
of research subjects at the Hospital: 

Arterio sclerosis and the degenerative diseases of 

middle and later life. 

The nutritional diseases, which are the chief cause 

of death among children under the age of two. 

The causes and means of preventing surgical shock. 

The decrease of maternal mortality. 

Carefully controlled measurements of the effects 

both in health and disease of the ductless glands. 

The causes of rheumatism and rheumatic fever. 

Free Care 

Ever since its foundation the Hospital has ad- 
mitted patients who need its help, without regard to 
race, creed or their ability to pay. During the depres- 
sion the proportion of cases which have been given 
care free or at less than cost has been exceedingly 
high. The daily cost of caring for a pavilion patient 
in 1934 was $7.21. In view of the fact that the 
pavilion rate is $4.00 a day, all pavilion patients were 
cared for at less than cost. Among them approxi- 
mately 20 per cent were cared for wholly free. 

The total cost of free and less than cost care for 
patients, exclusive of the costs of research and educa- 
tion, was $765,297.19 during 1934. 

Out-Patient Department 

A considerable item in free care is the work of the 
Out-Patient Department, to which, in 1934, 38,444 

[12] 



patients paid 2 19,257 visits for treatment. This was 
in addition to 8,410 persons who made 18,546 visits 
to the Accident and Admitting Ward for examina- 
tions and treatment. 

The Out-Patient Department is operated on an 
appointment system. An entire wing of the Hospital 
is devoted to special clinics for these patients, and all 
the special therapies, diagnostic laboratories and 
facilities available for bed patients are also available 
for them. Among them are a large number of persons 
of moderate means who come for special diagnoses 
and treatment on the recommendation of their family 
physicians. 

Social Service 

In connection with its out-patient and bed services, 
the New York Hospital operates a Social Service 
Department, thus helping patients to solve many 
problems which have a bearing on their own health 
and that of the community. The Social Service De- 
partments of both the New York Hospital and of the 
Lying-in Hospital are supported by the efforts of the 
voluntary women's auxiliaries of these institutions. 

The Woman's Clinic 

The Woman's Clinic, in which the work of the 

Lying-in Hospital is now carried on, is caring for 

many more maternity patients annually than the old 

Lying-in Hospital and the Manhattan Maternity 

[13] 



and Dispensary combined. Every one of its 193 beds 
and 131 bassinets is open. In 1934, 3,651 babies 
were born in the Clinic or under its supervision, and 
5,028 mothers and other women received bed care. 
This represented the largest volume of maternity 
work for any private hospital in the city. 

Despite the fact that the most dangerous and diffi- 
cult maternity cases are brought to hospitals, the 
1934 maternal death rate was only 1.7 per 1,000 
live births in the Woman's Clinic. This was the 
lowest rate in the history of the Hospital, and less 
than one-third of the maternal death rate for New 
York City as a whole. 

Maternity care included both pre-natal and post- 
natal instruction and care of mothers. The specialists 
of the Woman's Clinic and the Children's Clinic 
cooperate in the care of babies. 

The Children's Clinic 

The Children's Clinic, another of the special hos- 
pitals along the river, is devoted to treatment, teach- 
ing and research in the field of children's diseases. 
This clinic is carrying on the work of the New York 
Nursery and Child's Hospital. It has what are per- 
haps the most complete facilities available anywhere 
for care of premature infants. But neither this nor 
its many special services for children mean so much 
as the fact that here is a children's hospital which, in 

[14] 



addition to its own specialists, can command for any- 
baby or little child all of the knowledge and facilities 
of a great general hospital and a modern medical 
school. 

The fact that the New York Hospital operates the 
Convalescent Hospital for Children at White Plains 
enables it not only to help children through critical 
illness, but also to build up their strength again in a 
country environment. 

Healing the Personality 
The New York Hospital, contrary to the prevail- 
ing practice of many general hospitals, has continu- 
ously made provision for the treatment of disorders 
that affect the whole personality or mentality. It 
began in 1792 by admitting patients suffering from 
mental ills on the same basis as other patients. In 
1 82 1, the work was advanced and enlarged by the 
opening of a new department for mental patients in 
the open country near the seven-mile stone on the 
Bloomingdale Road, now the site of Columbia Uni- 
versity. 

Bloomingdale Hospital 
This was the origin of Bloomingdale Hospital 
which then was, and still is, operated by the Society 
of the New York Hospital. When it was located on 
Morningside Heights, Bloomingdale functioned as a 
general mental hospital. Since 1 894, however, when 

[15] 



it was moved to a 277-acre tract near White Plains, 
this branch of the New York Hospital has confined 
itself to curative work, admitting only such patients 
as appear to have a definite possibility for recovery. 
Bloomingdale provides, in addition to facilities for 
scientific treatment, an exceptionally happy environ- 
ment. Its recreational facilities include golf, tennis, 
swimming at York Lodge at Orienta Point, and many 
pleasant social and occupational opportunities with a 
definite therapeutic value. 

The Payne Whitney Clinic 

When the time came to plan the new hospital 
group along the East River, medicine was directing 
more and more attention to the personality of the 
sick. It was inevitable, therefore, that special pro- 
vision would be made for integrating in the new 
program the resources for psychiatric service that the 
Hospital had always possessed and fostered. This 
found expression in the establishment among the 
buildings at Sixy-eighth Street of the Payne Whit- 
ney Psychiatric Clinic. Here patients suffering from 
personality disorders are admitted as into other de- 
partments of the Hospital, for diagnosis and for 
shorter periods of treatment than at the Westchester 
Division. 

Psychiatric service is also furnished throughout 
every department of the New York Hospital, so that 

[16] 



whatever ailment may have led the patient to seek 
relief, means are provided for the study and treat- 
ment of every aspect of his illness whether of mental 
or physical origin. Nor is the service confined to 
patients admitted to the hospital. It is extensively 
operated in out-patient services in the study and 
treatment of adults and children. This integration of 
psychiatry with its other interests and activities is one 
of the most distinguished and advanced features of 
the new New York Hospital. 

The Private Pavilion 

The Private Patients' Pavilion is in itself a sepa- 
rate hospital, occupying the twelfth to the seven- 
teenth floors of the main building on its eastern 
exposure. It is designed to provide private patients 
not only with the most adequate medical care but also 
with an environment of comfort similar to that which 
they enjoy in their own homes. The Private Pavilion 
is equipped with its own reception rooms, service 
facilities, kitchen, and dining room for visitors. From 
its windows, solaria and sun roofs patients enjoy a 
magnificent view of the city and the river. Each of 
the special hospitals also maintains rooms for private 
patients. 

Nursing 

The New York Hospital performs two services in 
nursing. The first is to provide good nursing for its 

[17] 



own patients. The second is to provide a high stand- 
ard of training for student nurses. The Hospital 
maintains a staff of 278 graduate general duty nurses 
in addition to 87 supervisors and faculty. Thus its 
patients are not primarily dependent on students for 
nursing care. This also enables the students to gain 
a real education rather than mere apprenticeship 
training. 

The New York Hospital School of Nursing main- 
tains a course of university grade, in that both Cornell 
University and Temple University grant credit for it 
toward the Bachelor of Science degree. The School 
has approximately 100 undergraduates enrolled in 
addition to from 60 to 75 affiliates of other schools 
coming to it for special work. In addition there are 
approximately 40 graduate nurses enrolled for the 
study of nursing specialties. 

The Important Role of Food 

The scientific planning and appetizing prepara- 
tion and service of food is considered an important 
part of patient treatment. Thirty-five per cent of the 
patients are served diets which are specifically for 
the treatment of disease. The New York Hospital is 
considered unique for the ease and efficiency with 
which these special diets are served. In addition to 
preparing 1,705,341 meals a year the Nutrition 
Department also prepared 25,892 baby formulas. On 

[18] 





IN THE LYING-IN NURSERY 



8,97 l occasions during 1934 it aided out-patients 
with special instructions and demonstrations on pre- 
paring diets. This is exclusive of the nutrition classes 
attended by 1,721 mothers and a daily demonstra- 
tion class for mothers in formula preparation. 

Problems of Operation 

During the first year the Hospital's new plant was 
open, when it was not possible to operate at anywhere 
near capacity, a large deficit resulted. Expenses for 
1933 exceeded income from patients, endowments 
and expendable gifts by $762,656.42. In 1934 the 
operating deficit was reduced by $178,701.38. Dur- 
ing that year also economies and improvements in 
operation were inaugurated which should lead in 
1 9 3 5 to substantial reduction of the net deficit. A line 
budget has been installed which enables strict control 
of even the smallest purchase or requisition. An ex- 
tensive salvage system has been put into effect, under 
which food scraps, meat bones, barrels, iron drums, 
egg crates, bottles and scrap metal are systematically 
saved and sold. Reduction of salaries has been carried 
as far as it can be without impairing the efficiency of 
personnel. Finally, a manufacturing executive of 
wide experience and high ability has been placed in 
charge of the business management of the Hospital, 
as Executive Director. 

[20] 



Prospect for the Future 

During 1934 and the early part of 1 9 3 5 the Gov- 
ernors have leased the old hospital sites of the New 
York Hospital, the Lying-in Hospital and the Man- 
hattan Maternity and Dispensary. These properties 
are now a moderate source of income instead of a 
heavy expense. Together with the reorganization of 
operation, and the fact that patients are beginning to 
be able to pay more toward the cost of their care, the 
indications are that the Hospital should within the 
next few years reduce its deficit to a point where it 
can be met by annual gifts and bequests. 

The Opportunity 

To one who wishes to help mankind, the New 
York Hospital offers a splendid opportunity. Through 
it, a benefactor may command for men, women and 
children as high a standard of medical care as is to be 
found anywhere. In so doing he may also support 
educational and research activities of a type which 
are contributing to the advancement of human wel- 
fare wherever modern medicine is practiced. Last 
but not least, he may associate himself with that dis- 
tinguished company of citizens who over a period of 
more than a century and a half have contributed to 
make this institution the city of healing and of hope. 



[21] 



Gift Opportunities 

The structure of the New York Hospital, built 
"for a life of not less than ioo years/ 5 offers many 
opportunities for making memorial gifts as well as 
for contributions to the immediate relief of suffering. 

$20 will provide a blood transfusion to help save the 
life of a child. 

$40 will provide a transfusion for an adult. 

$75 will provide a long period of convalescent care 
for a child. 

$100 will provide prenatal care, delivery and post- 
natal care for a mother and child. 

$1,000 will provide a memorial bassinet for babies. 

$5,000 or more will establish a memorial fund, re- 
corded on the tablets of the main entrance hall. 

$10,000 will name a memorial bed, although the 
actual endowment cost is higher and varies according 
to the type of care to which it is devoted. 

$25,000 will endow a floor in the Nurses' Residence. 

$50,000 will buy a supply of radium needed for the 
Women's Clinic. 

There are also opportunities to put into operation 
those few pavilions and floors which are not yet open, 
such as an entire floor of the Children's Clinic and 
two Public Pavilions of the main hospital. 

[22] 



Legacies to the Hospital 

No precise words are necessary to a valid legacy to 
the corporation. The following clause, however, may 
be suggested: 

"I give to the Society of the New York Hospital, 
the sum of dollars." 

If land, or any specific personal property such as 
bonds, stocks, etc., is given, a brief description of the 
property should be inserted instead of the words "the 
sum of dollars." 



THE SOCIETY OF THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 



THE 

NEW YORK HOSPITAL 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

1935 - 1936 



VOLUME IV 



NUMBER I 



// after reading this bulletin there are 
further questions, please write to the Director 
of the School of Nursing. An application will 
be sent upon request if an applicant is able 
to satisfy the entrance requirements. 






THE SOCIETY OF THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 

THE 

NEW YORK HOSPITAL 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Associated with Cornell University 




Announcement 

1935-1936 



Volume iv 



Number i 




THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL — SOUTH VIEW 



CALENDAR 



1935 
September 28 

September 30 
November 5 . 
November 28 
December 22 
January 1 
December 25 



Matriculation and Registration (First 
year students) 

Winter Term begins — Classes convene 

Election Day — A holiday 

Thanksgiving Day 

Christmas Vacation (First year stu- 
dents only) 

Christmas Day — A holiday 



1936 

January 1 New Year's Day — A holiday 

January 2 Classes convene 

January 19 Winter Term ends. 

January 20 Spring Term begins — Classes convene 

February 22 Washington's Birthday — A holiday 

May 10 Spring Term ends 

May 11 Summer Term begins — Classes con- 
vene 

May 30 Memorial Day — A holiday 

July 4 Independence Day — A holiday 

September 26 ... . Matriculation and Registration (First 

year students) 
September 27 ... . Summer Term ends 

(Four weeks' vacation within the summer term 
for all second year students; three weeks r 
vacation for first year students.) 

September 28 ... . Winter Term begins — Classes convene 

Note: All holidays above indicated are observed by first year students. No clas9e* 
wSl be held on these days for second and third year students. 

[2] 



HISTORY AND GENERAL 
STATEMENT 



| v HE New York Hospital, the second oldest hospital in 
America, received its charter of incorporation under 
George the Third of England on the thirteenth day of June, 
1771, under the title of the Society of the Hospital in the 
City of New York in America. Subsequently by an Act of 
the Legislation in 1810 the title was changed to the Society 
of The New York Hospital. 

Although only a stone's throw from the present site of 
the Brooklyn Bridge, the building known as the New York 
Hospital was then erected so far out of town that it was con- 
sidered at too great a distance from the activities of the 
city. This institution added new buildings and continued 
its usefulness to the community until 1870, when it was 
deemed advisable to find a new location. The property 
known as the Thorne Mansion was purchased, on the south 
side of Sixteenth Street, between Fifth and Sixth Avenues, 
and extending through to Fifteenth Street. In 1877 the 
buildings were completed, some of which were occupied 
up to 1932. 

The first systematic and scientific training for nurses, 
through lectures and practical instruction on the wards, 
was begun in 1799 under the direction and tutelage of Dr. 
Valentine Seaman and continued throughout his association 
with the hospital until 1817. 

Shortly after the opening of the hospital at its new site 
it was determined to establish a school of nursing, the first 
class of which was admitted in 1877. Since then more than 
twelve hundred students have been graduated many of 
whom are to be found in important positions of administra- 
tion and teaching in schools of nursing and in public health 
organizations as well as in the field of private nursing. 

In June, 1927, the New York Hospital formed an asso- 
ciation with the Cornell University Medical College. The 
resources of each institution were increased and an exten- 
sive program of building was begun. 

[3 ] 



The new plant situated on York Avenue between Sixty- 
eighth and Seventy-first Streets was opened September, 
1932 and offers unusual opportunities and facilities for 
the progressive development of the school of nursing. The 
hospital with a potential capacity of one thousand beds 
cares for all types of acutely ill patients including medi- 
cal, surgical, obstetrical, gynecological, pediatric and psy- 
chiatric, and the out-patient department provides ample 
opportunity for the study of ambulatory patients. 

A special building for the school of nursing is adjacent 
to the hospital buildings. It provides adequate and well 
equipped classrooms, laboratories, library and recreation 
rooms as well as attractive and comfortable living accom- 
modations for the students and faculty. 

Further necessary laboratory and library facilities are 
available through the association with the Cornell Uni- 
versity Medical College. 

Affiliation is made with the Henry Street Visiting Nurse 
Service for field experience in public health nursing and 
with the Maternity Center Association and the Lobenstein 
Clinic for field experience in obstetrical nursing. 

The Social Service Department of the New York Hos- 
pital participates in the nursing program by the integration 
of social service throughout the entire course of study. 

The school of nursing is registered with the Regents of 
New York State which permits its graduates to take the State 
Board examinations in order to secure state registration. 

Requirements for Admission 

The matriculation requirement is satisfactory graduation 
from an accredited high school or recognized preparatory 
school in which the following units of study should have 
been taken: 

English 3 units 

History 1 unit 

Civics Yi unit 

Mathematics 2 units 

(Algebra 1 unit; plane geometry 1 unit) 

[4] 



Science • 2 units 

(Chemistry required; physics advised) 

Foreign Language 3 units 

(Three units of one language or two in 
each of two) 

Electives tyi units 

It is also advised that all students review arithmetic before 
entrance. 

Emphasis is placed upon scholarship of applicants. Pref- 
erence in admission will be given to those who have had ad- 
vanced study. It is advised that prospective students from 
college have introductory zoology or biology and 
psychology. 

Besides these scholastic admission requirements students 
should be at least twenty and not over thirty years of age 
and must present evidence of physical and personal fitness 
for nursing. 

A personal conference of the student and her parent or 
guardian with the Director of the School of Nursing is de- 
sirable and should be arranged after formal application has 
been submitted to the school. An appointment for an inter- 
view will be made upon request. 

All applications for admission should be addressed to the 
Director of the School of Nursing, 525 East Sixty-eighth 
Street, New York, New York. 

Exceptions to these matriculation requirements may be made 
only by offering substitutions satisfactory to the Committee on 
Admissions. 

Requirements for Nox-Citizexs 

According to the law of New York State every person 
admitted to the examination for license as registered nurse 
in New York State at the termination of her course of study 
must submit evidence that she is a citizen of the United 
States or has declared her intention of becoming such a 
citizen. The New York Hospital School of Nursing there- 
fore requires that an applicant fulfill these requirements 
prior to entrance to the school. 

[ 5 ] 



Advanced Standing 

Advanced standing may be granted those students who 
present credentials showing satisfactory completion of 
courses of study taken in other schools deemed of similar or 
equal value to those given in the New York Hospital School 
of Nursing. 

An applicant who has received her baccalaureate degree 
may have her time in the school reduced four months if she 
maintains a scholastic standing in the first and second years 
of an average of "B" grade. 

Accrediting by Cornell University 

To those students who may later wish to matriculate at 
the New York State College of Home Economics, Cornell 
University, if they present all other necessary requirements, 
the curriculum of the New York Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing will be credited to the amount of not less than forty-five 
hours, which is equivalent to one and a half academic years 
of college credit, toward the Bachelor of Science degree. 

The Curriculum 

The three-year curriculum of the school of nursing is so 
planned as to give each student a thorough understanding 
of the basic sciences and principles underlying good nursing 
and of the best methods to use in the care of the sick, in the 
prevention of disease, and in health education. 

Each of the three school years is divided into terms of 
sixteen weeks each. 

During the first term and a half limited nursing prac- 
tice is given in the pavilions of the hospital and the clinics 
of the out-patient department while a greater amount of 
time is spent in class and laboratory. In the subsequent seven 
and one-half terms the student's nursing practice increases 
in length of time and in reponsibility and a sequence is 
planned to include the various types of clinical services 
during day, evening and night periods in order that the 
student may acquire complete understanding of patients' 
needs. 

[6] 



During these clinical terms each student is scheduled 
forty-eight hours per week which includes all class and 
nursing practice assignments. 

Requirements of Scholarship and for Graduation 

Students will be graded in their studies on a basis of 
weighted quality points with an average of two quality 
points required for promotion and graduation. 

The following grading system has been established: 

A — Excellent 4 quality points 

B — Good 3 quality points 

C — Average 2 quality points 

D — Pass 1 quality point 

F — Failure — 1 quality point 

I — Incomplete . . Given in cases of absence and 

not because of poor scholarship 

Failure in any given subject may necessitate withdrawal 
from the school unless the student's scholarship is excep- 
tional in other respects in which case repetition of the course 
may be recommended by the instructor. 

Fees 

Matriculation Fee $10.00 

Payable at first registration; not refunded. 

Tuition Fee 60.00 

Payable at first registration; not refunded after 
second week for any cause of withdrawal. 

Laboratory Fee 10.00 

Payable at first registration; not refunded. 

Health Service Fee 5.00 

Payable at first registration; not refunded. 

Chemistry Laboratory Breakage Fee . . . 5.00 
Payable at first registration; amount not used 
for breakage to be refunded or excess breakage 
to be paid. 

[ 7] 



Graduation Fee 15.00 

To be required of all students graduating in 1937 
and thereafter. Payable at beginning of third 
term, third year. Refunded if student is not 
graduated. 

Total Fees for New York Hospital School of 

Nursing $105.00 

Tuition Fee for Henry Street Visiting Nurse 
Service 25.00 

Total $130.00 

In addition to above fees students pay a Student Activity 
Fee of $5.00 each year. This is collected by the class 
Treasurer. 

Maintenance and General Expense 

Room, board and limited laundry are provided each stu- 
dent while she is in the school. 

First-year students must furnish their own aprons and 
bibs, purchased through the school of nursing at a cost of 
approximately sixteen dollars. Except for these all uniforms 
are furnished each student during her course of study. 

The cost of text books, educational supplies and miscel- 
laneous articles largely determined by personal require- 
ments must be borne by each student; these may be esti- 
mated to amount to approximately seventy-five dollars for 
the first year, fifty dollars for the second and third years. 

During field experience with public health or social agen- 
cies students must defray incurred expenses. These expenses 
for the three years amount to approximately twenty-five 
dollars. 

For the three-year course it is estimated that the total cost 
to the student will be approximately three hundred and sixty 
dollars. 

A list of limited necessary personal equipment will be 
sent each prospective student when her application is 
accepted. 

[8 ] 



Registration and Orientation 

First-year students entering in the Fall of nineteen hun- 
dred and thirty-six must register at the school by noon on 
Saturday, September twenty-sixth. 

A brief orientation program precedes formal instruction 
during which time students take required psychological tests 
and an arithmetic pre-test, have necessary physical exam- 
inations with Schick and Dick tests, confer with faculty 
advisers and secure uniforms, books and other equipment. 

Health Regulations and Service 

The school of nursing maintains a health service for its 
students. A well equipped infirmary and necessary staff are 
provided in the nurses' residence. A physical examination by 
the school physician with chest x-rays is required upon 
admission to the school and subsequent annual physical 
examinations will be given. 

Vaccinations against typhoid fever and smallpox will be 
requested of all students before admission to the school. 
Schick and Dick tests and immunization for positive re- 
actions will be required of all students before or after 
admission to the school. Mantou tests will be given during 
the pre-clinical period and for those who are negative will 
be repeated at regular intervals. 

Infirmary care for minor illnesses will be limited to four 
weeks at any one time in the case of all students. For more 
serious illnesses requiring constant attention students will be 
cared for gratuitously in the hospital for not more than two 
weeks at any one time for the first-year students and not 
more than four weeks at any one time for second and third- 
year students. 

Vacations and Other Absences 

During the first and second years a vacation of four weeks 
is planned and during the third year one of two weeks. 
For first-year students one week's vacation is given at 
Christmas (see calendar) and three weeks during the sum- 

r 9 1 



mer term. For all second-year students a vacation of four 
weeks is planned during the summer term of the year. For 
third-year students a two weeks' vacation is planned during 
any one of the three terms. This vacation is not given to 
those students who have an exemption of time. 

All vacations are arranged by the school of nursing to 
conform to the requirements of the educational program 
and the fields in which clinical practice is obtained. 

Except for first-year students during their first term holi- 
days are observed only in connection with class schedules. 

As a result of absences the repetition of a course of study 
or special examinations may be required; class registration 
may be changed and in most instances nursing practice will 
have to be made up. 

Scholarship Aid and Loan Fund 

Scholarship aid is made available to a limited number 
of students who have proven themselves well fitted for the 
profession, who have high standards of scholarship and who 
are in financial need. A student loan fund has also been 
established to give necessary financial aid to those students 
who show promise in their chosen field. These financial 
benefits are not available to first-year students until after 
their first term's work. 

Applications for scholarship aid and student loans should 
be made to the Director of the School. 

Social and Extra-Curricular Opportunities 

Believing that the education of young women today must 
include activities relating to healthful social relationships 
generous provision for this development in the student life 
of the school has been made. 

The beautiful fireproof, sixteen-story residence, erected 
adjacent to the hospital buildings, is the center for these 
activities. Every effort has been made in its construction to 
provide for the normal and healthy life of students and 
faculty. 

Each of the eight student residence floors contains attrac- 
tively furnished single bedrooms with lavatories, ample 

[10] 



common baths, showers and toilet facilities, a common 
sitting-room with adjoining kitchenette for informal gath- 
erings and a laundryette. 

Comfortable lounges, reading, reception and dining- 
rooms are on the first and ground floors. 

For further recreational activities, a large well equipped 
gymnasium, billiard-room, game-room and porches are 
available. Arrangements for the use of an outdoor play- 
ground and an indoor swimming pool have been made. 

To insure the full benefit and proper use of these facilities 
well qualified instructors are appointed to direct the social 
and recreational activities of the school. 

School Government 

The school of nursing has a cooperative government in 
which the students take an active part. A student organiza- 
tion has been established and has plans for the social dis- 
cipline of its group. 

An annual student activities fee of five dollars is required 
and collected by each class. 



[11] 



THE CURRICULUM 



FIRST YEAR 



Class and Approximate Credit 
Laboratory Hours Hours 

Hours Practice 



Anatomy 60 

Bacteriology and Pathology ... 66 

Chemistry 60 

Physiology 45 

Nursing Ethics 15 

Social and Economic Aspects of 

Health and Disease 30 

Nursing Principles and Practice . . 136 

Elementary Psychology 30 

Mental Hygiene 15 

Psychology of Deviate Behavior . . 15 

Development of Behavior in 

Children 30 

Materia Medica 45 

Nutrition and Cookery 30 

Diet Therapy 30 

Medicine 35 £ 

Communicable Diseases . ... 25$ 

Medical Nursing 15 

Psychiatric Nursing 

Surgery 45 

Surgical Nursing 15 

(Orientation — 24 hours — no credit, 
includes Personal Hygiene — 
10 hours) 



• . . 


2 


... 


2 


... 


2 


... 


Wz 




1 




2 


300 


6 


... 


2 


• . * 


1 




1 




2 


• • . 


3 


... 


Wl 




Wl 




4 


320 


4 


160 


1 


... 


3 


480 


5 



Totals 742 

[12] 



1260 4S% 



SECOND YEAR 

Class and 

Laboratory 

Hours 

Medical Nursing 

Diet Therapy Practice 

Operative Technique 15 

Pediatrics 30 

Pediatric Nursing 30 

Obstetrics and Gynecology .... 45 
Obstetrical and Gynecological 

Nursing 15 

History of Nursing 30 

Totals 165 



Approximate 

Hours 

Practice 


Credit 
Hours 


192 


Wi 


192 


m 


369 


4 


. . . 


V/ 2 


708 


y/z 




3 


708 


7 




2 



[13 



THIRD YEAR 

Class and 

Laboratory 

Hours 

Medical Nursing 8 

Diet Therapy Practice 

Surgical Nursing 8 

Emergency Nursing 16 

Psychiatry 30 

Psychiatric Nursing 30 

Special Therapeutics 

Community Health IS 

Community Nursing Practice 

Out-Patient Nursing Practice 

Private Patient Nursing Practice . ... 

Professional Problems 15 

Home Nursing IS 

Totals 137 

First Year Total Hours and 

Credits 742 

Second Year Total Hours and 

Credits 165 2169 29 

Third Year Total Hours and 

Credits 137 2242 25^ 



Approximate 
Hours 
Practice 


i Credit 
Hours 


440 


V/z 


96 


1 


396 


Wz 


. . . 


1 


. . . 


2 


396 


4*/ 2 


146 


1 


. . . 


1 


384 


3 


192 


Wi 


192 


Wi 


. . . 


1 




1 


2242 


25 y z 


1260 


\tyz 



Grand Totals 1044 5671 100 



[14] 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

Anatomy 

This course includes both gross and microscopical ana- 
tomy. The gross anatomy is taught by lectures, demonstra- 
tions and student dissection of the cadaver. The microscop- 
ical work is directly correlated with the gross dissection and 
includes lectures, demonstrations and a detailed study of 
prepared slides. Significant embryological information is 
included in the lectures. 

60 Hours, First Year 
Dr. Armstrong 

Bacteriology and Pathology 

The study of the habits and morphology of microorgan- 
isms emphasizing those of pathogenic character; sources, 
modes and prevention of infection; disinfection and asepsis; 
the more important tissue changes occurring in the healing 
process, infections and neoplasms; clinical microscopy of 
the blood and blood grouping; kidney function and urin- 
alysis. Practical demonstrations and applications will be 
made which will relate directly to nursing. The blood 
group of each student will be ascertained and recorded. 
Lectures, recitations and laboratory. 

44 Hours, First Year — Bacteriology 

22 Hours, First Year — Pathology 

Dr. Wheeler, Dr. Stillman and Miss Thomas 

Chemistry 

A course designed to acquaint the student with the 
elementary facts of chemistry and biochemistry useful in 
nursing practice and to give some understanding of the 
chemical workings of the body in health and disease. After 
a short review of inorganic chemistry, the chemical proces- 
ses involved in respiration, digestion, metabolism, excretion 
and motion are studied briefly. This provides a chemical 

[15] 



background for the courses in physiology, nutrition and 
materia medica. Lectures, recitations and laboratory. 

60 Hours, First Year 
Miss Gottschall 

Materia Medica 

A course designed to acquaint the student with the funda- 
mental weights, measures, terms and symbols used in the 
preparation and administration of drugs, common anti- 
septics, disinfectants and other solutions. A study of im- 
portant and commonly used drugs; their preparation, 
dosage, administration, physiological and therapeutic ac- 
tions, idiosyncracies, cumulative and minor toxic symptoms, 
antidotes and emergency treatments. Emphasis is placed on 
the accurate administration of drugs and the careful 
observation of their effects, through supervised practice in 
nursing courses. 

45 Hours, First Year 
Miss Wilson 

Medical Nursing 

1. Medicine 

Medical aspects of diseases are considered in these lec- 
tures and clinics. Material presented will supplement, em- 
phasize or interpret required reading covering etiology, 
sources of infection, symptomotology, usual course, pathol- 
ogy, complications, treatment, prognosis and prevention. 

35 Hours, First Year 
Dr. DuBois and staff 

2. Communicable Diseases 

A study of communicable diseases, including tuberculosis. 
Special emphasis is placed upon etiology, modes of trans- 
mission and prevention. Lectures and clinics. 

25 Hours, First Year 

Dr. DuBois and staff 

[16J 



3. Principles of Medical Nursing Including Communicable 

Disease Nursing 

Through lectures, clinics and demonstrations, students 
are taught principles and methods of nursing as applied to 
the care of medical patients. In the third year emphasis is 
placed upon the managerial and teaching problems. 
15 Hours, First Year 
8 Hours, Third Year 
Miss Amberson, Miss Wilson and Miss Daum 

4. Practice of Medical Nursing Including Communicable 

Disease Nursing 

Supervised practice and study of the application of 
medical nursing principles and methods to the care of pati- 
ents on the medical pavilions of the hospital. In addition 
students study and practice medical aseptic nursing as re- 
lated to the care of patients suffering from communicable 
diseases including tuberculosis. Practice includes care of 
patients during day, evening and night. Demonstrations and 
conferences. 

952 Hours, First, Second and Third Years 
(Includes 192 hours of communicable disease nursing) 
Miss Amberson, Miss Wilson, Miss Daum, Miss Kay, 
Mrs. Kohler and staff 

5. Practice in Care of Private Patients 

Application of principles of medical and surgical nursing 
to the care of private patients. 

192 Hours, Third Year 

Miss Moffatt, Miss Beach and staff 

Nursing 

1. Orientation 

This course is designed to give the beginning student a 
general conception of the field of nursing; the responsibili- 
ties and obligations of each individual in choosing the 
profession; the importance of general conduct in building 

[17] 



up the right habits of living and attitudes of the nurse. 
Includes lectures in personal hygiene emphasizing the 
importance of physical and mental health especially as it 
relates to the life of the nurse and is reflected in her work. 

24 Hours, First Year 

No credit 

Miss Wolf, Miss Kennedy, Miss Frost 

2. Principles of Nursing 

A course designed to give the student a basic understand- 
ing of the principles of nursing with emphasis upon her 
attitude toward her patient, the existing social relationships, 
the physical requirements for the proper care of patients 
and the procedures found most helpful in their care. 

136 Hours, First Year 
Miss Wyatt 

3. Practice of Elementary Nursing 

The application of the theories of nursing in laboratory 
practice, in the surgical supply room and in the actual care 
of convalescent patients in the pavilions and out-patient 
department of the hospital. 

300 Hours, First Year 

Miss Wyatt, Miss Zorn and Miss Gaute 

4. History of Nursing 

A survey of the historical development of nursing from its 
early conception to modern times. Lectures and recitations. 

30 Hours, Second Year 
Miss Anderson 

5. Nursing Ethics 

A general consideration of fundamental ethical and phil- 
osophical principles and their application to problems 
which arise in the practice of nursing. An attempt will be 
made to coordinate this course closely with each course of 
nursing practice through class discussions of pertinent 
problems. 

15 Hours, First Year 
Miss Wolf 
[18 J 



6. Professional Problems 

Through a general survey of the nursing field, the student 
has an opportunity to learn the trends and advances in the 
profession; the need and opportunities for specialized prep- 
aration; the importance and types of legislation; the activi- 
ties of professional organizations and the obligations of 
their members. Lectures and recitations. 

15 Hours, Third Year 
Miss Wolf 

7. Emergency Nursing 

This course supplements the instruction in nursing and 
deals with the application of these principles to emergency 
situations in the home and community. It demonstrates also 
the methods of teaching first aid to various groups. Lectures 
and demonstrations. 

16 Hours, Third Year 

Dr. Redden 

8. Home Nursing 

This course is planned primarily for a review of the 
more common nursing procedures with special emphasis 
upon their modifications in order to make them more ap- 
plicable to the care of the patient in the home. It also 
serves as an introduction to community nursing by discussion 
of the principles of public health nursing and the use of 
community agencies in family health work. 

15 Hours, Third Year 
Miss Frost and Miss Wyatt 

See description of other courses in nursing relating to 
specific clinical fields. 

Nutrition 
1. Nutrition and Cookery 

An elementary course in normal human nutrition with 
emphasis upon the preparation and the utilization of food 
by the body in health. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Rynbergen 
[19] 



2. Diet Therapy 

A course designed to present the underlying principles in 
treatment of disease by means of special dietaries. Lectures, 
recitations and laboratory. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Rynbergen 

3. Practice of Diet Therapy 

The application of the principles of diet therapy in 
supervised practice on the pavilions in the hospital and in 
the out-patient clinic. Conferences and case studies. 
288 Hours, Second and Third Years 
Miss Gillam, Miss Rynbergen and Miss Stimpson 

Obstetrics and Gynecology 

1. Obstetrics and Gynecology 

This course deals with physiological and pathological 
changes during pregnancy, labor, and puerperium; the 
care of the normal newborn; the nutrition of the mother 
and baby; the prevention of complications; the social sig- 
nificance of infant and maternal mortality; the relation of 
obstetrics to various gynecological conditions; the results 
of infection and tumor growth and the required surgical 
interference and operative treatment. Lectures, clinics and 
conferences. 

45 Hours, Second Year 

Dr. Stander and staff 

Mrs. Mills and Miss Rynbergen 

2. Principles of Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing 

This course emphasizes the importance of prenatal in- 
struction, observation and care; infant, obstetrical and 
gynecological nursing procedure with particular attention 
to infections and their special therapy. Classes, demonstra- 
tions and conferences. 

15 Hours, Second Year 

Miss Hickcox, Miss Klein, Miss Treiber, Miss Geuss 

[20] 



3. Practice of Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing 

Under supervised practice in the pavilions, nurseries, 
operating rooms, labor and delivery rooms, and out-patient 
department, students have the opportunity to observe and 
care for infants and obstetrical and gynecological patients. 
Case studies and conferences. 

708 Hours, Second Year 

Miss Hickcox, Miss Gould, Miss Klein, 

Miss Treiber, Miss Geuss and staff 



Pediatrics 



1. Pediatrics 



This course deals with normal growth and development 
and the diseases of infancy and childhood, with emphasis 
on infant welfare, prevention of morbidity and mortality 
and infant nutrition. Lectures and clinics. 

30 Hours, Second Year 
Dr. Levine and staff 

2. Principles of Pediatric Nursing 

The basic principles in the care of well and sick infants 
and children are given together with the social, educational 
and nutritional aspects of their treatment and behavior as 
normal children. Classes, conferences and demonstrations. 

30 Hours, Second Year 

Miss Schubert, Miss Gould, Miss Boquist, Miss Sykes 

3. Practice of Pediatric Nursing 

This consists of supervised experience in aseptic nursing 
methods in the care of infants and children on the pavilion 
formula laboratory, premature nursery, out-patient depart- 
ment and nursery school. Case studies and conferences. 
708 Hours, Second Year 

Miss Schubert, Miss Boquist, Miss Sykes, Miss Nason, 
Miss Johnson, Miss Angerstein and staff 

[21] 



4. Development of Behavior in Children 

A study of the normal child and his behavior. The sus- 
ceptibility of the child's behavior responses to the various 
details of family life and of school will be emphasized. 
Lectures and recitations. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Professor Whitley 

Personal Hygiene and Public Health 

1. Personal Hygiene 

(10 hours — Included in Orientation Course.) 

2. Physical Education 

Each student will be required to participate in regular 
physical exercise designed primarily to maintain positive 
health with emphasis upon posture and corrective measures 
and to stimulate sportsmanship. 

128 Hours, First Year 

64 Hours, Second and Third Years 

Miss McDermott and Miss Young 

3. Social and Economic Aspects of Health and Disease 

A course of study given concurrently with the lectures on 
medical diseases emphasizing their social and economic 
aspects. It deals with the prevention of sickness and the pro- 
motion of health, with consideration of the contributing 
factors in home and community. Lectures and conferences. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Frost 

4. Community Health 

A course of study given as preparation for practice in 
community nursing. It considers the aims and scope of 
public health activities and the part of the nurse in this pro- 
gram. The relationship between the hospital and other 
health and social agencies of the community is emphasized. 
Lectures, conferences, family case studies. 

15 Hours, Third Year 
Miss Frost 
[22] 



5. Community Nursing Principles and Practice 

Supervised nursing practice in the out-patient depart- 
ment and in the home through affiliation with Henry Street 
Visiting Nurse Service. Contact with the home and observa- 
tion of community agencies is also furnished in the out- 
patient department through the social service department 
and the tuberculosis district. 

384 Hours, Third Year 

Henry Street, Visiting Nurse Service 

192 Hours, Third Year 

Medical and Surgical Out-Patient Department 

Physiology 

This course is designed to give a basic understanding of 
the functions of the normal human body as an essential 
prerequisite to the study of health and nutrition and the 
pathological changes due to disease. Lectures, recitations, 
laboratory, demonstrations. 

45 Hours, First Year 
Dr. Grundfest 

Psychiatry 

1. Mental Hygiene 

A consideration of mental hygiene as a potential means 
of prevention of psychopathic conditions. This includes an 
historical survey of the mental hygiene movement, a dis- 
cussion of the problems peculiar to children, adolescents 
and adults and an introduction to the techniques and social 
agencies available in helping people meet their problems. 

15 Hours, First Year 
Dr. Greenacre and staff of Out-Patient 
Department and Nursery School 

2. Psychiatry 

A course of study designed to acquaint students with psy- 
chopathic conditions, and their etiology, pathology, and 
treatment. Also included is a rudimentary introduction to 
the fields of neurology and endocrinology. Lectures. 

30 Hours, Third Year 
Dr. Henry and staff 
[23] 



3. Principles of Psychiatric Nursing 

This course is organized to give students an understanding 
of the basic principles in the nursing care of psychopathic 
patients and the nursing procedure used in their treatment. 
Emphasis is placed also upon the relation of mental illness 
to physical illness and of early development to future adult 
life. Lectures, demonstrations and clinics. 

30 Hours, Third Year 

Miss Sprogell, Miss Knox and staff 

4. Practice of Psychiatric Nursing 

The application of the principles of psychiatric nursing 

through supervised practice in and conferences on the care 

of children and adults in the in-patient and out-patient 

departments. Behavior studies and case studies. 

556 Hours, First and Third Years 

Miss Knox, Miss Corrigan, Miss Lewis and staff 

5. Special Therapeutics 

This study gives the student an understanding of the use 
of hydrotherapy and occupational and recreational therapies 
in the care of mentally ill patients. Conferences and super- 
vised practice. 

146 Hours. Third Year 

Miss Gunderson, Miss Hibbler and Mr. Lavvson 

Psychology 

1. Elementary Psychology 

An introduction to the study of human behavior and the 
underlying principles of mental adjustments and habit 
formation. An effort will be made to apply this study to the 
adjustment of the student to her own personality as it affects 
her professional life and to the better understanding of the 
adjustment of patients to their illnesses. Recitations and 
lectures. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Kennedy 
[24] 



2. Psychology of Deviate Behavior 

Consideration of mental hygiene and a study of the devia- 
tions from usual behavior in adults and children to an 
understanding of such adjustments patients may profitably 
make to their illnesses. Lectures, recitations and clinics. 

15 Hours, First Year 
Miss Kennedy 

Mental Hygiene (See Psychiatry) 

Development of Behavior of Children (See Pediatrics) 

Surgical Nursing 

1. Surgery 

Surgical aspects of diseases are presented in these lectures 
and clinics. Factors determining the need for surgical inter- 
ference are discussed and the major steps in the operation 
outlined. Special emphasis is placed upon signs, symptoms 
and observations which should be made both preceding and 
following operation as well as upon points which should be 
stressed in nursing these patients. 

45 Hours, First Year 
Dr. Heuer and start 

2. Principles of Surgical Nursing 

Through lectures, clinics and demonstrations students are 
taught the principles and methods of surgical asepsis and 
the nursing of surgical patients. In the third year emphasis 
is placed upon managerial and teaching problems. 

15 Hours, First Year 
8 Hours, Third Year 
Miss Amberson, Miss Moser, 
Miss Keller, Miss Grainger 

3. Practice of Surgical Nursing 

Supervised practice and study of the application of 
surgical nursing principles to the care of pre-operative and 
post-operative patients on surgical pavilions of the hospital. 

[25] 



Practice includes care of patients during the day, evening 

and night. Demonstrations and conferences. 
876 Hours, First and Third Years 
Miss Amberson. Miss Moser, Miss Keller, Miss 
Grainier, Miss Kay. Mrs. Kohler and staff 

4. Operative Technique 

This course is designed to give thorough preparation and 
to develop skill in surgical aseptic technique; to develop 
alertness to observations of significant changes in patients 
during the administration of anaesthetics; to develop dex- 
terity and intelligent response in assisting with operations 
and in meeting emergencies. Six weeks general operating 
room, two weeks gynecological operating room. 

15 Hours, lectures, demonstrations and conferences 
369 Hours, practice — Second Year 
Mrs. Ray, Miss Fremd and Miss Jensen 



[26] 



The Society of the New York Hospital 

GOVERNORS 

Wilson M. Powell President 

Bronson Winthrop Treasurer 

Augustine J. Smith Secretary 

Henry W. DeForest Arthur Iselin John Hay Whitney 

Charles S. Brown G. Beekman Hoppin William V. Astor 

Henry G. Barbey Lewis Cass Ledyard, Jr. George F. Baker 

Cornelius N. Bliss R. Horace Gallatin Barklie McKee Henr\ 

Paul Tuckerman Joseph H. Choate, Jr. Langdon P. Marvin 

William Woodward Frank L. Polk H. Williamson Pell 

George T. Bowdoin 



Assistant Secretary 
Bruce Lancaster 



Assistant Treasurers 
Walter J. Nichols 
United States Trust Company of New York 



Executive Director, New York Hospital 

Murray Sargent 



Council of the School of Nursing 

Wilson M. Powell, Chairman 
Livingston Farrand, M.D. Mary M. Roberts, R.N. 

Barklie McKee Henry Flora Rose 

Murray Sargent Eugene F. DuBois, M.D. 

Mary Beard, R.N. Anna D. Wolf, R.N. 



Alumnae Committee of the School of Nursing 

Mary Beard, Chairman Annie W. Goodrich, V ice-Chairman 

Lydia E. Anderson Minnie H. Jordan 
Irene H. SUTLIFFE, Honorary Member 

[27] 



Anna L. Reutinger 
Lillian D. Wald 



OFFICERS OF 
ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY 

Anna D. Wolf, M.A., R.N. 

Director of the School of Nursing 
and Director of the Nursing Service 

B.A. Goucher College, 1911; Diploma in Nursing, The Johns Hopkins 
Hospital School for Nurses, 1915; M.A. Teachers College, Columbia 
University, 1916; Robb Fellow, Teachers College, Columbia University, 
1925-1926; Instructor and Assistant Superintendent of Nurses, The Johns 
Hopkins Hospital School for Nurses, 1916-1919; Instructor of Nursing, 
Vassar Training Camp for Nurses, Summer 1918; Superintendent of 
Nurses, Peking Union Medical College, Peking, China, 1919-1924; Dean 
of the School of Nursing, ibid., 1924-1925; Associate Professor of Nursing 
and Superintendent of Nurses, The University Clinics, The University 
of Chicago, 1926-1929; Associate Professor of Nursing and Director of 
Nursing, ibid., 1929-1931 ; Director of the School of Nursing and Director 
of the Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1931-. 

Irene H. Sutliffe 

Directress Emeritus, School of 
Nursing 

Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1880; 
Organized Hamot Hospital, Erie, Pennsylvania; Organized School for 
Nurses, Long Island College Hospital, Brooklyn; Directress of Nurses, 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1886-1902; Charge of Nursing 
Service, Camp Black, during Spanish-American War; Organized Infantile 
Paralysis Emergency Hospital, New York, 1916; Directress Emeritus, 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932- ; Member of the Society 
of the New York Hospital; Honorary Member of the Alumnae Com- 
mittee of the New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-. 

Lydia E. Anderson, B.A., R.N. 

Special Lecturer, History of 
Nursing 

B.A. Rutgers Female College, New York; Diploma in Nursing, New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, 1897, Part-time Student, Teachers 
College, Columbia University, 1909-1910; Assistant Superintendent of 
Nurses, Sloane Maternity Hospital, 1897-1902; Private Duty, 1902-1903; 
Assistant Superintendent of Nurses, Long Island College Hospital School 
of Nursing, 1903-1904; Assistant Superintendent of Nurses, Mount Sinai 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1904-1908; Private Nursing, 1908-1909; 
Visiting Teacher, thirty-two hospitals in New York and vicinity, 1910- ; 

r 28 1 



Member, State Board of Nurse Examiners, 1910-1927; Member, Alumnae 
Committee, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932- ; Special Lec- 
turer, History of Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-. 

Harriet Frost, R.N. 

Associate Director, School of Nursing; 
Director, Public Health Nursing 

Diploma in Nursing, St. John's Hospital, Yonkers, 1906; Course in Public 
Health Nursing, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1915-1916; As- 
sistant Superintendent and Superintendent of Nurses, St. John's Hospital, 
1908-1910; Superintendent, Mercer Hospital, Trenton, 1913-1915; Direc- 
tor, Department of Instruction, Visiting Nurse Society, Philadelphia, 1916- 
1932; Supervisor, Public Health Nursing Department, Pennsylvania 
School of Social and Health Work, 1919-1932; Associate Director, New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932- ; Director, Public Health Nurs- 
ing, ibid., 1932-. 

May Kennedy, M.A., R.N. 

Associate Director, School of Nursing; 
Director of Pedagogy 

Diploma in Nursing, St. Joseph's Hospital, Chicago, 1907; B.S. Teachers 
College, Columbia University, 1917; M.A. University of Chicago, 1932; 
Chief Nurse, Illinois State Hospitals, 1907-1918; General Staff Nurse and 
Chief Nurse, American Expeditionary Forces, France, 1918-1919; Super- 
intendent of Nurses, Indianapolis City Hospital, 1919-1920; Director of 
Nursing and Director of Illinois State School of Psychiatric Nursing, 
Illinois Department of Public Welfare, 1920-1932; Lecturer, University 
of Chicago, Summer Quarters, 1928-1931; Director of Institutes, 1 922- ; 
Lecturer, University of Wisconsin, one semester, 1931-1932; Lecturer. 
De Paul University, Summer Session, 1929; Associate Director, New 
York Hospital School of Nursing 1932- ; Director, Pedagogy, ibid., 1932-. 



[29 



ASSISTANT DIRECTORS 

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS & MEMBERS 

OF OTHER HOSPITAL DEPARTMENTS* 

Katharine G. Amberson, B.S., R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing; 
Head of Medical and Surgical Nursing 
Instruction and Services 

Diploma in Nursing, The Johns Hopkins Hospital School for Nurses, 
1919; B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1930; Night Super- 
visor, Harriet Lane Home, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 1919; Assistant 
Supervisor, Out-Patient Department, ibid., 1919-1920; General Staff 
Nurse, Battle Harbor Hospital, Labrador, Summers, 1919, 1920; General 
Staff Nurse, and Head Nurse, Rockefeller Institute Hospital, 1920-1923 ; 
Superintendent of Nurses and Director of Nursing School, Ogden Mills 
School of Nursing, Trudeau Sanatorium, 1923-1928; Instructor and 
Executive Secretary, Nursing Education Department, Teachers College, 
Columbia University, 1930-1932; Assistant Director, New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1932-; Head of Medical and Surgical Nursing In- 
struction and Services, New York Hospital, 1932-. 

Gertrude S. Banfield, B.A., R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing; 
Head of Out-Patient Nursing Instruction 
and Service 

B.A. Vassar, 1918; Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of 
Nursing, New York, 1920; Assistant Head Nurse, Medical Ward, Pres- 
byterian Hospital, New York, 1920; General Staff Nurse and Head 
Nurse, Out-Patient Department, Peking Union Medical College, Peking, 
China, 1921-1924; Supervisor, Max Epstein Clinics, The University of 
Chicago Clinics, 1927-1931 ; Assistant Director, New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, 1932- ; Head of Out-Patient Nursing Instruction and Service, 
New York Hospital, 1932-. 

Florence Eaton, B.A. 

Director, Payne Whitney 
Nursery School 

B.A. Colby, 1918; Part-time Student, Columbia University, 1918; Stu- 
dent, Longy School of Music, Boston, 1921-1922; Part-time Student, 
Harvard Graduate School of Education and Boston University, 1923- 



*Arranged alphabetically. 

[30] 



1924; Diploma. Nursery Training School of Boston, 1925 ; Student, 
Summer Session, London Academy of Music, 1931; Director, Cambridge 
Nursery School, 1925-1932; Assistant Director and Director, Pre-School 
Summer Camps, 1924, 1927, 1932, 1934, 1935; Assistant Director, 
Nursery Training School of Boston, Summer, 1925; Instructor in Music, 
ibid., 1927-1932; Children's Supervisor, Vassar Summer Institute of 
Euthenics, 1928; Director, Out-Patient Nursery School, Payne Whitney 
Clinic, New York Hospital. 1932-1933; Director, Payne Whitney Nursery 
School, New York Hospital, 1933-. 

S. Margaret Gillam, M.A. 

Director, Department of Nutrition 

Teacher's Diploma, Home Economics, Mechanics Institute, Rochester, 
New York, 1916; B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1922 
M.A., ibid., 1923; Dietitian, Rochester General Hospital. 1918-1919 
Superintendent, Woman's Industrial Home, Medical Lake, Washington 
1919-1921; Director, Dietetics and Housekeeping, University of Michigan 
Hospital, 1923-1932; Instructor, Institutional Management, Teachers 
College, Columbia University, Summers 1924-1930; Instructor, Nutrition, 
Department of Public Health and Hygiene, University of Michigan, 
1925-1932; Instructor in Nutrition. Extension Division, ibid., 1930; Direc- 
tor, Department of Nutrition, New York Hospital, 1932-. 

Verda F. Hickcox, B.S., R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing; 
Head of Obstetrical and Gynecological 
Nursing Instruction and Service. 

Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School for Nurses, Chicago, 
1916; Certificate of Public Health, Chicago School of Civics and Philan- 
thropy, 1919; B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1927; 
C. M. B., General Lying-in Hospital and School of Midwifery, London, 
England, 1928; Chief Nurse, Longfellow Mining and Accident Hospital, 
Morenci, Arizona, 1916-1918; General Staff Nurse, U. S. Army Base 
Hospital No. 13, France, 1918-1919; Psychiatric Social Worker, Psychi- 
atric Hospital, Dunning, Illinois, 1920; Community Nurse, American 
Red Cross, Morenci, Arizona, 1920-1922; Private Duty, 1922-1924; 
General Staff Nurse, University of Wisconsin Hospital, 1924-1925; Pri- 
vate Duty, 1925-1926; Supervisor, Visiting Nurse Association, York, 
Pennsylvania, 1927-1928; Instructor and Assistant to Director, Brooklyn 
Maternity Center Association, 1928; Instructor of Midwifery and Super- 
visor of Obstetrical and Gynecological Departments, Siriraj Hospital. 
Bangkok, Siam, 1929-1931 ; Consultant Nurse, Maternity, Infancy and 
Child Hygiene, New York State Department of Health, 1931-1932; As- 
sistant Director, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; Head of 
Obstetrical and Gvnecological Nursing Instruction and Service, New York 
Hospital, 1932-. 

[31] 



Hannah L. Josephi, R.N. 

Director, Social Service 

Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1901 ; Part- 
time Student, New York School of Philanthropy, 1913; Part-time Student, 
New School for Social Research, 1931 ; Supervisor, Private Patient Floor, 
New York Hospital, 1901-1902; Superintendent, House of Holy Com- 
forter, New York, 1902-1905; Superintendent of Hospital and Director, 
Nursing Service, Mountainside Hospital, 1907-1909; Director, Social 
Service, New York Hospital, 1912-. 

Mary T. McDermott, M.A. 

Director, Nurses' Residence; 
Instructor, Physical Education 

Diploma, Bouve Boston School of Physical Education, 1916; Special 
Courses, Harvard University, 1917, 1919, 1931; People's College, Den- 
mark, 1926; B.S. New York University, 1930; M.A. ibid., 1932; Super- 
visor, Physical Education, Third Supervisory District, Greene County, 
N. Y., 1915-1918; Supervisor, Physical Education, City Schools, Fitch- 
burg, Massachusetts, 1918-1919; Supervisor of Playground, Concord, 
Massachusetts, 1919; Supervisor, Physical Education, City Schools, Revere, 
Massachusetts, 1919-1921 ; Supervisor of Playground, Brookline, Massa- 
chusetts, 1921; Director, Recreation and Physical Education, Stockbridge, 
Massachusetts, 1921-1922; Director, Recreation, City of New Haven, 
1922-1924; Director, Physical Education and Health, State Normal 
School, Fitchburg, Massachusetts, 1924-1929; Director, Physical Edu- 
cation, Dalton Experimental School, New York, 1930-1931 ; Assistant 
Director Student Activities, New York University, 1931-1932; Instructor, 
Physical Education, ibid., Summer 1932; Instructor, Physical Education, 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; Director, Nurses' Resi- 
dence, ibid., 1932-. 

Alice Maud Moffatt, R.N. 

Head of Private Patients' Nursing Service 

Bishop Bethune College, Oshawa, Canada, 1904-1906; Diploma in Nurs- 
ing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1912; Private Duty, 1912- 
1915; General Staff Nurse, Hopital Militaire V. R. 76, France, 1915- 
1916; Supervisor, Private Patients' Building, New York Hospital, 
1917-1932; Head of Private Patients Nursing Service, New York 
Hospital, 1932-. 

Sarah E. Moore, R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing; 
Administrative Assistant, Day Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1913; Part- 
time Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, and New York 

[32 1 



University, 1914, 1926, 1927, 1928; Teacher, Public Schools. 1903-1908; 
Head Nurse, New York Hospital, 1913-1918; Instructor, Practical Nurs- 
ing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1918-1922; Assistant 
Directress of Nurses, ibid., 1923-1932; Acting Directress of Nurses, ibid., 
1932; Administrative Assistant, Day Nursing Service, New York Hos- 
pital, 1932-. 

Bessie A. R. Parker, R.N. 

Administrative Assistant, Evening Nursing 
Service 

Graduate Provincial Normal School, Fredericton, N. B., Canada, 1905; 
Diploma in Nursing, Rhode Island Hospital Training School for Nurses, 
Providence, 1918; Part-time Student, Teachers College, Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1932-1935; Teacher, Public Schools, 1905-1915; Assistant Super- 
intendent of Nurses and Instructor, Nursing Practice, Rhode Island 
Hospital Training School for Nurses, 1918-1920; Assistant Superintendent 
of Nurses and Instructor, Nursing Practice, Bridgeport General Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1920-1921 ; Assistant Superintendent of Nurses and 
Instructor, Nursing Practice, Methodist Episcopal Hospital School of 
Nursing, Brooklyn, 1921-1926; Superintendent of Nurses, ibid., 1926- 
1932; Administrative Assistant, Evening Nursing Service, New York 
Hospital, 1932-. 

Agxes Schubert, M.S., R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing; 
Head of Pediatric Nursing Instruction 
and Service 

B.S. Northwestern University, 1917; Diploma in Nursing, Western 
Reserve University School of Nursing, 1926; M.S. Teachers College, 
Columbia University, 1932; Supervisor, Babies' and Children's Hospital, 
Western Reserve University, 1926-1927; Assistant Instructor and Super- 
visor, ibid., 1927-1928; Assistant Director, ibid., 1928-1930; Supervisor 
and Instructor, Bobs Roberts Hospital, The University of Chicago Clinics, 
1930-1931; Assistant Director, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 
1932- ; Head of Pediatric Nursing Instruction and Service, New York 
Hospital, 1932-. 

Carolyn A. Sprogell, R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing; 
Director, Psychiatric Nursing 

Diploma in Nursing, St. Lukes Hospital School of Nursing, New York, 
1924; Post-graduate Course, Psychiatry, Bloomingdale Hospital, 1930; 
Part-time Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1929-1934; 
Head Nurse, Southampton Hospital, 1924; Night Supervisor, ibid., 1925; 
Private Duty, 1926; Assistant Superintendent and Instructor, Practical 

[33 1 



Nursing, Southampton Hospital, 1927-1928; Supervisor, St. Lukes Hos- 
pital, New York, 1929; Assistant Director of Nurses, Bloomingdale 
Hospital, 1930-1931; Acting Director of Nurses, ibid., 1931-1932; As- 
sistant Director, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932- ; Director, 
Psychiatric Nursing, Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic, New York 
Hospital, 1932-. 

Gertrude L. Tomlinson, R.N. 

Administrative Assistant, Night Nursing 
Service 

Graduate State Normal School, Mansfield, Pennsylvania, 1905; Diploma 
in Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1920; Public School 
Teacher, 1905-1917; Directress of Nurses, Blossburg Hospital, Blossburg, 
Pennsylvania, 1921-1922; Private Duty, 1922-1930; Night Supervisor, 
New York Hospital, 1930-1932; Administrative Assistant, Night Nursing 
Service, New York Hospital, 1932-. 



[34] 



INSTRUCTORS AND SUPERVISORS* 

Louise Angerstein, B.S. 

Dietitian, Children's Clinic 

B.S. Temple University, 1932; Dietetic Certificate, Montefiore Hospital. 
1933; Dietitian, Children's Clinic and Milk Formula Room, New York 
Hospital, 1933-. 
Gertrude Victoria Boquist, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Pediatric 

Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Lutheran Hospital School of Nursing, Moline. 
Illinois, 1926; Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1928- 
1929 and 1931-1932; General Staff Nurse, Obstetrical Service, Research 
and Educational Hospital, Chicago, 1927; General Staff Nurse, Albert 
Merritt Billings Hospital, The University of Chicago Clinics, 1927-1928; 
Head Nurse, Pediatric Service, Bellevue Hospital, Summer and Fall, 1929; 
Supervisor, Children's Memorial Hospital, Chicago, 1929-1931 ; Instructor, 
Pediatric Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932- ; Super- 
visor, Pediatric Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1932-. 
Henrietta P. Bouton, B.A., R.N. 

Instructor, Medical Social 
Service Principles and Practice 

B.A. Wellesley College, 1906; Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1921 ; Student, Columbia University Extension Courses, 
1924, 1931 ; Instructor, Medical Social Service Principles and Practice, 
New York Hospital Social Service Department, 1933-. 
Eleanor M. Corrigan, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, 
Psychiatric Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, St. Luke's Hospital School of Nursing, New York, 
1927; Post-graduate Course in Psychiatry, Bloomingdale Hospital. 1932 
Part-time Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1933-1935 
Operating Room Supervisor, St. Luke's Hospital, New York, 1929-1932 
Head Nurse, Payne Whitney Clinic, New York Hospital. 1932-1935 
Instructor, Psychiatric Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing 
1935- ; Supervisor, Payne Whitney Clinic, New York Hospital, 1935-. 
Helen M. Daum, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor and Assistant Supervisor, 
Medical Nursing Service 
Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1918; B.S. 
Teachers College, Columbia University, 1932; Private Dutv Nursing, 
1918-1929; School Nursing, Ottawa. Illinois, 1929-1930; Head Nurse, 
Medical Pavilion, New York Hospital, 1932-1934; Instructor, Medical 
Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1934- ; Assistant Medical 
Supervisor, New York Hospital, 1934-. 

•Arranged alphabetically. 

[35] 



Laura Wood Fitzsimmons, R.N. 

Instructor and Night Supervisor, 
Psychiatric Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, The Army School of Nursing, 1926; Part-time 
Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1933-1934; Head Nurse, 
Walter Reed Hospital, 1926-1929; Supervisor, Psychiatric Department, 
Gallinger Hospital, 1928-1933; Instructor, Psychiatric Nursing, New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, 1933-; Assistant Night Supervisor, 
Payne Whitney Clinic,' New York Hospital, 1933; Night Supervisor, ibid., 
1934-. 

Mary D. Fremd, R.N. 

Instructor, Operative Technique and Practice; 
Assistant Supervisor, General Operating Room 

Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1930; Night 
Supervisor, Public Operating Room, New York Hospital, 1930-1931; 
Suture Nurse, Public and Private Operating Rooms, ibid., 1931-1935; In- 
structor, Operative Technique and Practice, New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, 1935- ; Assistant Supervisor, General Operating Room, New 
York Hospital, 1935-. 

Catherine P. Geuss, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor and Assistant Supervisor, 
Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing Service 

Diploma in Teaching, Northeast Missouri Teachers College, 1924; 
Diploma in Nursing, Michael Reese Hospital School of Nursing, 1928; 
Diploma, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Woman's Hospital, New York, 
1929; Student, University of Chicago, 1930; B.S. and Diploma in Super- 
vision, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1932; Teacher, 1919- 
1924; Head Nurse and Instructor, Obstetrical Nursing, Michael Reese 
Hospital, 1929-1930; Supervisor, Surgical Wards, ibid., 1930-1931; 
Instructor, Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing, New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1932- ; Assistant Supervisor, Obstetrical and Gyneco- 
logical Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1932-. 

Helen W. Gould, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor, Public Health Nursing 

Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1918; B.S. 
Teachers College, Columbia University, 1930; Overseas Service, Army 
and Red Cross in France and Italy, 1918-1919; Red Cross Public Health 
Nurse, 1919-1920; School Nursing, Norwood, Massachusetts, 1921-1926; 
Staff Nurse and Assistant Supervisor, East Harlem Nursing and Health 
Service, 1926-1929; Red Cross Nursing Field Representative, 1930-1933; 
Assistant to National Director, Public Health Nursing, American Red 
Cross, 1933-1934; Instructor, Public Health Nursing, New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1934-. 

[36] 



Margaret F. Grainger, B.A., R.N. 

Instructor and Surgical Supervisor, 
Surgical and Urological Nursing Service 

B.A. Butler University, 1927; Diploma in Nursing, Johns Hopkins 
Hospital School for Nurses, 1930; Head Nurse, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 
1930-1931; Assistant Director, Practical Nursing, Johns Hopkins Hos- 
pital School for Nurses, 1931-1934; Assistant Superintendent of Nurses, 
Johns Hopkins Hospital, 1934-1935; Instructor, Surgical and Urological 
Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1935- ; Supervisor, 
Surgical and Urological Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1935-. 

Anna H. Gudelsky, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Psychiatric 
Nursing 

Diploma in Nursing, The Army School of Nursing, 1923; Student, 
Public Health, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1923-1924; Stu- 
dent, Rollins College, 1927; Charge of Out-Patient Clinic, Walter Reed 
Hospital, 1925; Supervisor, Charles T. Miller Hospital, 1926; Private- 
Duty, 1927; Operating Room, Flower Hospital, 1928; Supervisor, Psy- 
chiatric Institute, Columbia Medical Center, 1929-1932; Instructor, Psy- 
chiatric Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932- ; Super- 
visor, Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic, New York Hospital, 1932-. 

Cora E. Kay, R.N. 

Instructor and Evening Supervisor, Medical 
and Surgical Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, St. Luke's Hospital School of Nursing. Chicago, 
1921 ; Student, University of Minnesota, and Teachers College, Columbia 
University, 1924, 1927, 1929; Part-time Student, Teachers College. 
Columbia University, 1932-1935; Instructor, Practical Nursing, and 
Supervisor of Wards, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, 1921-1923; 
Assistant Superintendent of Nurses, St. Luke's Hospital School of Nursing, 
St. Louis, 1923-1926; Instructor, Practical Nursing, St. Luke's Hospital 
School of Nursing, Chicago, 1926-1927; Superintendent of Nurses, Chicago 
Memorial Hospital^ 1927-1928; Instructor, Practical Nursing, and 
Second Assistant to Superintendent of Nurses, Clifton Springs Sanitarium 
and Clinic, 1929-1932; Instructor, Medical and Surgical Nursing, New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932- ; Evening Supervisor, Medical 
and Surgical Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1932-. 

Caroline Keller, B.A., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Surgical 
Nursing Service 

B.A. Smith College, 1921 ; Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital 
School of Nursing, New York, 1929; Instructor, Miss Dav's School. 
New Haven, 1921-1924; Instructor, The Holman School, Philadelphia. 

[37] 



1924-1925; Head Nurse, Surgical Ward, New Haven Hospital, 1929- 
1930; Assistant Supervisor, Surgical Nursing, New Haven Hospital, 
1930-1932; Instructor, Surgical Nursing, New York Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1932- ; Supervisor, Surgical Nursing Service, New York Hos- 
pital, 1932-. 

Mary Elizabeth Klein, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Obstetrical 
and Gynecological Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Hahnemann Hospital School of Nursing, 1916; 
Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1928; Part-time Student, 
Cleveland College and School of Nursing, Western Reserve University, 
1930-1932; Supervisor, Private Hospital, Guayaquil, Ecuador, 1917-1918; 
Private Duty, 1918-1921; Supervisor, Private Floors, Hahnemann Hos- 
pital, 1921-1925; Supervisor, Operating Rooms, ibid., 1925-1928; Head 
Nurse, Maternity Hospital, Western Reserve University, 1929-1930; 
Supervisor and Assistant Instructor, ibid., 1930-1932; Instructor, Obstet- 
rical and Gynecological Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 
1932- ; Supervisor, Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing Service, New 
York Hospital, 1932-. 

Elizabeth J. Knox, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor and Assistant Director, 
Psychiatric Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Bloomingdale Hospital School of Nursing, 1925; 
B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1928; Supervisor, Blooming- 
dale Hospital, 1925-1926 and 1927-1928; Charge of Private Sanitarium, 
Syracuse, 1929-1930; Instructor and Assistant Director of Nurses, Shep- 
pard and Enoch Pratt Hospital School of Nursing, 1930-1932; Instructor, 
Psychiatric Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1933- ; As- 
sistant Director, Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic, New York Hospital, 
1933-. 

Mrs. Alice Kohler, R.N. 

Instructor and Evening Supervisor, 
Medical and Surgical Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, New York, 
1932; Part-time Student, Hunter College, New York, 1932-1933; Part- 
time Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1934-1935; General 
Staff Nurse, New York Hospital, 1932-1933; Head Nurse, Surgical Supply 
Room, ibid. 1933-1934; Instructor, Medical and Surgical Nursing, New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, 1934- ; Evening Supervisor, Medical 
and Surgical Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1934-. 

Eleanor Lewis, B.A., B.N., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Psychiatric 
Out-Patient Nursing Service 

B.A. Radcliffe College, 1925; B.N. Yale University School of Nursing, 

[38] 



1928; Nurse in Charge, Urological Clinic, New Haven Hospital, 1928 
1929; Psychiatric Nursing, Four Winds Sanatorium, Katonah, New York 
1929-1932; Assistant Head Nurse, Children's Service, Payne Whitne\ 
Clinic, New York Hospital, 1932-1933; Staff Nurse, ibid., 1933-1934 
Staff Nurse, Brooklyn Visiting Nurse Association, 1934-1935; Instructor 
Psychiatric Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1935- 
Supervisor, Psychiatric Out-Patient Nursing Service, Payne Whitnev 
Clinic, New York Hospital, 1935-. 

Lucy J. Macdonald, R.N. 

Supervisor, Private Operating Room 

Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1927; Part- 
time Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1927 ; Head Nurse, 
Surgical Ward, New York Hospital, 1927; Suture Nurse, Public Oper- 
ating Room, ibid., 1928-1931 ; Supervisor, Private Operating Room, ibid., 
1932; Head Nurse, Emergency Pavilion, New York Hospital, 1932-1933; 
Supervisor, Private Operating Room, ibid., 1934-. 

Mrs. Louise M. Mills, B.S. 

Dietitian, Women's Clinic 

B.S. Florida State College for Women, 1931 ; Dietetic Certificate and 
Graduate Study, University Hospital, University of Michigan, 1931-1932; 
Dietitian, Women's Clinic, New York Hospital, 1932-. 

Elizabeth Moser, B.A., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Surgical 
Nursing Service 

B.A. Bluffton College, Bluffton. Ohio, 1921; Diploma in Nursing, The 
Johns Hopkins Hospital School for Nurses, 1926; Staff Nurse, McCosh 
Infirmary, Princeton University, 1927-1929 and 1930-1931; Staff Nurse. 
Anglo-American Nursing Home, Rome, Italy. 1929-1930; Assistant 
Superintendent and Instructor, Practical Nursing, Palmerton Hospital, 
Palmerton. Pennsylvania, 1931-1932; Instructor, Surgical Nursing, New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932- ; Supervisor, Surgical Nursing 
Service, New York Hospital, 1932-. 



Grace Conway Nason. R.N. 



Instructor and Night Supervisor, 
Pediatric Nursing Service 



Diploma in Nursing. Lynn Hospital School of Nursing. 1927; Diploma 
in Psychiatric Nursing, McLean Hospital School of Nursing, 1927; Post- 
Graduate Course, Pediatrics, Babies' Hospital, Western Reserve Uni- 
versity, 1928; Part-time Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, 
1932-1933; Hunter College, 1933-1934; Night Supervisor, Marblehead 
Hospital, 1927-1928; Supervisor and Instructor, Pediatric Nursing Service, 

[39] 



Metropolitan Hospital, 1929-1932; Instructor, Pediatric Nursing, New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932- ; Night Supervisor, Pediatric 
Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1932-. 

Jeanette Peterson, R.N. 

Instructor and Night Supervisor, 

Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing Service. 

Diploma in Nursing, Augustana Hospital Training School for Nurses, 
1929; Student, Colorado State Teachers College, Summer, 1933; Student, 
Hunter College, Fall of 1934; Night Supervisor, Labor and Delivery 
Rooms, Augustana Hospital, 1929; Supervisor, Obstetrical Department, 
Immanuel Hospital, Omaha, 1929-1931 ; Supervisor, Obstetrical Depart- 
ment, Greeley Hospital, Greeley, Colorado, 1932; General StafI Nurse, 
U. S. Veterans' and Women's and Children's Hospital, Albuquerque, New 
Mexico, 1933; General Staff Nurse, U. S. Veterans' Administration 
Hospital, Fort Lyon, Colorado Springs, 1934; General Staff Nurse, Ob- 
stetrical and Gynecological Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1934; 
Instructor, Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing, New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1934- ; Supervisor, Obstetrical and Gynecological 
Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1934-. 

Flora Pieper, M.A. 

Dietitian, Nutrition Clinic 

Diploma, The Stout Institute, 1924; Ph.B., The University of Chicago, 
1930; M.A. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1932; Diploma, Food 
Clinic, Pennsylvania Hospital, Philadelphia, 1932; Dietitian, Lutheran 
Hospital, La Crosse, Wisconsin, 1924-1926; Dietitian, Springfield Hospi- 
tal, Springfield, Illinois, 1926-1928; Nutritionist, American Red Cross, 
St. Joseph, Missouri, 1930-1931 ; Dietitian, Nutrition Clinic, New York 
Hospital, 1933-. 

Mrs. B. S. Ray, R.N. 

Instructor, Operative Technique and Practice; 
Supervisor, General Operating Rooms 

Diploma in Nursing, Peter Bent Brigham Hospital School of Nursing, 
1928; Head Nurse, Private Ward; Assistant Supervisor, Operating 
Rooms; Teaching Supervisor, Operating Rooms, Peter Bent Brigham 
Hospital, 1929-1931; Private Duty, 1931; Supervisor, Eye Operating 
Room, Massachusetts Eye & Ear Infirmary, 1931-1932; Head Nurse, 
Surgical Supply Room, New York Hospital, 1932-1933; Instructor, 
Operative Technique and Practice, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 
1933- ; Assistant Supervisor, General Operating Rooms, New York Hos- 
pital, 1933-1935; Supervisor, ibid., 1935-. 

Henderika J. Rynbergen, B.S. 

Instructor, Nutrition 

B.S. Simmons College, 1922; Nutrition Worker, Neighborhood Kitchen, 
Boston, 1922-1924; Food Clinic Dietitian, Washington University Dis- 

[40] 



pensary, Barnes and Allied Hospitals, St. Louis, 1924-1926; Head Dietitian, 
Sea View Hospital, New York, 1927; Ward Dietitian, Presbyterian Hos- 
pital, New York, 1927-1928; Food Clinic Dietitian, Vanderbilt Clinic, 
ibid., 1928-1929; Dietitian, American University Hospital, Beirut, Syria, 
1929-1934; Instructor in Nutrition, New York Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing, 1934-. 

Bernice Stambaugh, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor and Evening Supervisor, 
Pediatric Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Clifton Springs Sanitarium and Clinic Training 
School, 1931; B.S. Mount Union College, 1932; Head Nurse, Obstetrical 
Floor, New York Nursery and Child's Hospital, 1932-1933; Instructor 
and Supervisor, Pediatric Service, ibid., 1933-1935; Instructor, Pediatric 
Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1935- ; Evening Super- 
visor, Pediatric Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1935-. 

Mabel R. Stimpsox, B.S. 

Dietitian, Nutrition Clinic 

B.S. University of Washington, 1929; Dietetic Certificate, Peter Bent 
Brigham Hospital, 1930; Dietitian, Food Clinic, Boston Dispensary, 1930- 
1932; Dietitian, Nutrition Clinic, New York Hospital, 1932-. 

Ethel M. Sykes, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Pediatric 
Nursing Service 

Teaching Certificate, West Riding Education Department, Yorkshire, 
England, 1921 ; Student, Geneseo Normal School, Summer 1925; Diploma 
in Nursing, Geneva General Hospital School of Nursing, 1929; Part-time 
Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1929 and 1935; Part- 
time Student, Hunter College, 1930; Assistant Infants' Mistress, Wester- 
ton Council School, Yorkshire, England, 1921-1924; School Teacher, 
1925-1926; Head Nurse, Medical Ward, Pediatric Department, Bellevue 
Hospital, 1929; Assistant Teaching Supervisor, Pediatric Department, 
ibid., 1929-1932; Supervisor in Charge. Pediatric Department, ibid., 
1932-1933; Instructor, Pediatric Nursing Service, New York Hos- 
pital School of Nursing, 1933- ; Supervisor, Pediatric Service, New York 
Hospital, 1933-. 

Margery Treiber. B.S., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor of Nurseries, 
Obstetrical Nursing Service 

Diploma, Idaho Technical Institute, 1919; Diploma in Nursing, Wesley 
Memorial Hospital School of Nursing, 1922; B.S. Teachers College, 
Columbia University, 1927; Private Duty, 1922-1923 and 1924-1926; 
General Staff Nurse, St. Luke's Hospital, San Francisco, 1923; General 
Staff Nurse, Pacific Hospital, Los Angeles, 1924; Chief Night Nurse, 

[41] 



Oregon Short Line Emergency Hospital, Pocatello, Idaho, Summers 1925- 
1926; Supervisor, Pediatric Department, Bellevue Hospital, 1927-1928; 
Supervisor in Charge, Pediatric Department, ibid., 1928-1929; Assistant 
Superintendent of Nurses, Reading General Hospital, 1929-1930; Super- 
visor of Wards, ibid., 1930-1932; Instructor, New Born Care, New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; Supervisor of Nurseries, Obstetrical 
Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1932-. 

Jeanette Walters, R.N. 

Instructor and Evening Supervisor, Obstetrical 
and Gynecological Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Temple University Hospital School of Nursing, 
1923; Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, Summer 1924, 
Part-time Student, ibid., 1933, 1934, 1935; Post-Graduate Course, Ob- 
stetrics, Woman's Hospital, New York, 1932; Supervisor, Medical and 
Surgical Ward, Temple University Hospital, 1924-1925; Supervisor, 
Babies' Hospital, Philadelphia, 1926-1928; Assistant Superintendent, 
Columbia Hospital, 1928-1929; Supervisor, Obstetrical Department, 
Temple University Hospital, 1930; Instructor, Obstetrical and Gyneco- 
logical Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932- ; Evening 
Supervisor, Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing Service, New York 
Hospital, 1932-. 

Florence K. Wilson, M.A., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Medical 
Nursing Service 

B.A. University of Michigan, 1913; Vassar Training Camp for Nurses, 
Summer 1918; Diploma in Nursing, City Hospital School of Nursing, 
New York, 1920; Study of Cost of Nursing Education under Direction 
of May Ayres Burgess, Western Reserve University School of Nursing, 
1930; Study of Duties of Supervisors. Western Reserve University School 
of Nursing, 1931 ; M.A. Western Reserve University, 1931 ; Author, 
Ward Study Units in Medical Nursing; Private Duty, New York City, 
1921; Staff Nurse, Henry Street Visiting Nurse Association. 1922; In- 
structor and Supervisor in Medical Nursing. The Lakeside Hospital and 
Western Reserve University School of Nursing, 1923-1929; Supervisor, 
University of Nebraska Hospital. 1932-1934; Instructor, Medical Nursing, 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1934-. Supervisor, Medical Nurs- 
ing Service. New York Hospital, 1934-. 

Margaret Wyatt, B.A., R.N. 

Instructor, Nursing Principles and Practice 

B.A. Meredith College, 1923; Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1927; Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, 
Summers 1931, 1932; Instructor and Assistant to the Dean of Women, 
Meredith College. 1923-1924; Head Nurse, Surgical Ward. New York 
Hospital, 1927-1930; Instructor, Nursing Principles and Practice, New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, 1930-. 

[42] 



STUDENT AND STAFF HEALTH 

Evelyn Holt, M.D Physician-in-Charge 

Phyllis Greenacre, M.D Consultant Psychiatrist 

Elsie Davies, R.N Supervisor, Infirmary 



[43] 



ASSISTANT INSTRUCTORS AND 
HEAD NURSES* 



Ida Addy, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Women's Surgical Pavilion 

Dorothy Allison 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse 
Obstetrical and Gynecological Isolation Pavilion 

Marjorie Arehart, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Urological Pavilion 



Elizabeth Brodie, R.N. 

Alice Burlin, R.N. 
Winifred Cantwell, R. N. 

Alice Eva Claflin, R.N. 

Kathryn L. Conklin, R.N. 

Gwendolyn S. Cooper, R.N. 

Virginia Daniels, R.N. 

Barbara Derr, R.N. 



Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Women's Surgical Pavilion 

Head Nurse, Private Patients' Floor 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
General Operating Rooms 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Pediatric Pavilion 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Men's Surgical Pavilion 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Private Gynecological Floor 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Isolation Pavilion 



Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
General Operating Rooms 



Marjorie Drew, R. N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 

Women's Convalescent Service, Payne Whitney Clinic 



♦Arranged alphabetically. 



[44] 



Mrs. Henry Dunning, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Isolation Pavilion 

Cornelia Eckhardt, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Women's Acute Service, Payne Whitney Clinic 

Sarah M. Ferguson, R.N. 



Dorothy S. Fisher, R.N. 
Norween K. Fisher, R.N. 
Alice Fogg, R.N. 



Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Pediatric Pavilion 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Gynecological Pavilion 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Pediatric Pavilion 



Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Labor and Delivery Rooms 

Edith Gaeckle, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Evening Charge Nurse, 
Labor and Delivery Rooms 

Martin Grothe, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse. 
Men's Acute Service, Payne Whitney Clinic 

Elizabeth Harmon. B.A., R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Men's Surgical Pavilion 

Mildred Harrington, R.N. 

Head Nurse, Private Patients' Floor 

Beulah M. Hartman, R.N. 



Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Obstetrical Pavilion 



Beatrice Healy, R.N. 



Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 

Women's Semi-Convalescent Service, Payne Whitney Clinic 

Anna Hill, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse. 
Private Obstetrical Floor 

[45] 



Thirza Hills, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Women's Surgical Pavilion 

Dorothy Hobart, B.S., R.N. 

Head Nurse, Semi-Private Floor 

Helena H. Hurn, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Men's Surgical Pavilion 

Mildred Jensen, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Obstetrical & Gynecological Operating Room 

Margit Johnson, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Emergency Pavilion 

Margaret Joinville, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 

Women's Admission Service, Payne Whitney Clinic 

Margaret Kelleher, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 

Men's Admission Service, Payne Whitney Clinic 

Margaret Kelly, R.N. 

Head Nurse, Pediatric Metabolic Unit 

Elizabeth Viola Kribs, R.N. 

Head Nurse, Private Patients' Floor 

Margaret Landes, R.N. 

Head Nurse, Semi-Private Floor 

Ethel MacKay, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Metabolism Pavilion 

Veronica Matus, R.N. 

Charge Nurse, Obstetrical and Gynecological 
Admission Pavilion 



Frances Morrison, R.N. 



Nora Paulson, R.N. 



Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Men's Medical Pavilion 

Assistant Instructor and Hear' Nurse, 
Obstetrical Pavilion 

[46] 



Helen Schumann, R.N. 



Mildred Stone, R.N. 



Dorothy Vernstrom, R.N. 



Myrna Wight, R.N. 



Elizabeth Woods, R.N. 



Ada Wyman, R.N. 



Rosamond Young 



Katherine Zorn, R.N. 



Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Urological Pavilion 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Pediatric Pavilion 



Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Women's Medical Pavilion 



Head Nurse, Private Patients' Floor 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Obstetrical Pavilion 

Head Nurse, Private Patients' Floor 

Assistant Instructor, Physical Education 
Assistant Director, Nurses' Residence 

Assistant Instructor and Head Nurse, 
Surgical Supply Room 



ASSISTANTS IN ADMINISTRATION 

Flora Josephine Bergstrom, R.N. Librarian 

Dorothy Jacobus, B.A. Secretary-Registrar 

Marian Welton Secretary 



l 47 J 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY MEDICAL COLLEGE 

FACULTY AND OTHERS PARTICIPATING IN 

INSTRUCTION* 

Philip B. Armstrong, M.D. 

Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

Gertrude Gottschall, M.A. 

Assistant in Bio-Chemistry 

Harry Grundfest, M.D. 

Assistant in Physiology 

Ralph G. Stillman, M.D. 

Assistant Professor of Clinical Pathology 

Ruth Thomas, A.B., C.P.H. 

Instructor, Applied Bacteriology 

George W. Wheeler, M.D. 

Assistant Professor of Bacteriology 



Eugene F. DuBois, M.D., and Staff 

Professor of Medicine 
George W. Henry, M.D., and Staff 

Professor of Psychiatry 
George S. Heuer, M.D., and Staff 

Professor of Surgery 
Samuel Z. Levine, M.D., and Staff 

Acting Professor of Pediatrics 
Henricus J. Stander, M.D., and Staff 

Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology 



Camille Gaute 

Instructor of Massage 

R. C. Redden, M.D. 

Director, First Aid, American Red Cross 

Mary T. Whitley, Ph.D. 

Professor of Psychology, Teachers College, Columbia University 

MEMBERS OF AFFILIATING ORGANIZATIONS 

Hazel Corbin, R.N. 

General Director Maternity Center Association 

Margaret A. Wales, M.A., R.N. 
General Director of Nursing 
Visiting Nurse Service, Henry Street Settlement 

♦Arranged alphabetically. 

[48] 



THE SOCIETY OF THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 



THE 

NEW YORK HOSPITAL 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 



Supplementary Announcement 

GRADUATE COURSES 
1935-1936 



VOLUME IV NUMBER 1 



GENERAL STATEMENT 

The New York Hospital School of Nursing offers to 
graduate nurses courses in Obstetrical and Gynecologi- 
cal Nursing, Psychiatric Nursing, Surgical Nursing and 
Operating Room Management. These courses are designed 
for nurses desiring a broader basic preparation in one spe- 
cific branch of clinical nursing and for those who are seek- 
ing information and experience in the modern methods of 
care and treatment. 

The Faculty and Facilities for Study 

Instruction is given by the faculties of the New York 
Hospital School of Nursing and the Cornell Medical 
College. The Clinical Departments of the New York Hos- 
pital, the Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic and the Lying- 
in Hospital, integral parts of the New York Hospital, offer 
splendid opportunities for practice in the selected fields. 
The Hospital has a capacity of eight hundred and seventy- 
nine beds for acutely ill patients and one hundred and 
thirty-one bassinettes for newborn infants, with approxi- 
mately one hundred and twenty-five operations weekly and 
an active out-patient department for the study of ambulatory 
patients. 

The library of the School of Nursing contains about one 
thousand volumes besides pamphlets on medicine, nursing 
and allied subjects as well as current publications. The 
Cornell Medical College library is available to students of 
the nursing school. In addition to these main libraries there 
are departmental libraries on the various floors of the 
hospital. 

Matriculation Requirements 

An applicant for admission should be between the ages 
of twenty-two and thirty-five, a graduate of a high school 
of good standing and of an accredited school of nursing. 
She must also be a registered nurse and present evidence of 
personal and professional fitness for the special type of 
nursing for which she has applied. Arithmetic with 

[2] 



emphasis upon ratio, percentage and the metric system 
should be reviewed before admission. 

In addition to the general requirements for admission an 
applicant for the course in Operating Room Management 
will be required to present evidence of the following: 

1. Satisfactory completion of not less than six weeks 
experience in a general operating room while an under- 
graduate student. 

2. Experience as a head nurse or assistant head nurse 
within the two years previous to submitting application or 
satisfactory completion of graduate study including such 
courses as ward management, ward teaching or supervision 
in nursing. 

3. Graduation from a school of nursing within five years. 

Concerning Admission 

Applications for admission should be addressed to the 
Director of the School of Nursing, 525 East Sixty-eighth 
Street, New York, New York, and should be sent as early 
as possible preceding the term in which the applicant de- 
sires to enter the school. 

Admission dates are as follows: Obstetrical and Gynecolo- 
gical Nursing — September 1, October 1, January 3, Feb- 
ruary 1 , May 1 and June 1 ; Psychiatric Nursing — October 1 , 
February 1 and June 1; Surgical Nursing — September 1, 
November 1, January 3, March 1, May 1 and July 1 ; Oper- 
ating Room Management — One student the first of each 
month. 

Registration is always on the day preceding the date of 
admission. If the registration date falls on a Sunday the 
date is changed automatically to the Saturday preceding 
and admission to the school is changed to Sunday. 

Health Regulations 

Each applicant is required to present evidence of physical 
fitness before admission. She should have had smallpox 
vaccination within the past seven years and typhoid inocu- 
lation within the past three years. Each student registered 
for obstetrics is required to have had a negative Schick test 

[3] 



and a report of a Dick test; immunization for positive 
Schick test is obligatory. An applicant registering for this 
course is also required to present a report of two successive 
negative throat cultures for streptococcus hemolyticus taken 
within two weeks prior to the date of admission. Another 
throat culture will be taken on arrival at the school and 
subsequently as indicated. 

The School of Nursing maintains a health service for all 
students. A limited number of days' care for acute illness 
will be given either in the infirmary or the hospital. Chronic 
and prolonged acute illness cannot be cared for at the 
expense of the school. 

Expense 

The School of Nursing provides each student with room, 
board and laundry and gives a monthly allowance of ten 
dollars. This maintenance and stipend are considered a 
working scholarship. 

A matriculation fee of ten dollars, a health service fee of 
five dollars and a house activity fee of fifty cents for six 
months or less are required of each student at the time of 
registration. These fees are not refundable. 

Each student is required to purchase note-books, nursing 
manuals and metric system cards costing approximately two 
dollars and fifty cents. 

Each student must provide her own uniform and should 
wear the graduate or the student uniform, with cap, of her 
own school. Low heeled white or black shoes with rubber 
lifts must be worn. 

Curriculum 

Each department has a special curriculum, a description 
of which follows. The schedule includes theory and prac- 
tice with conferences and case studies amounting approxi- 
mately to fifty-two hours per week day and fifty-six hours 
per week night. A maximum of four weeks of evening or 
night duty may be required. The students are required to 
attend classes, to do assigned reference reading, to write 
case studies and special term papers and to participate in 
class discussion. 

[4] 



At the end of the course if the student has satisfactorily 
met all requirements a transcript of her record of scholastic 
achievement in class and nursing practice will be given to 
her. A fee of one dollar is charged for each additional 
transcript. 

Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing 

Advisor: Verda Hickcox, B.S., R.N. 
Head of Obstetrical and 
Gynecological Nursing 
Instruction and Service. 
Basic Course 

This course is designed for the graduate nurse who desires 
to learn newer methods in obstetrical and gynecological 
nursing and to increase her skill in the care of the obstetrical 
and gynecological patient. 

Lectures, clinics, demonstrations and conferences 60 hours 

Nursing 130. Obstetrics and Gynecology 45 hours 

Nursing 131. Principles of Obstetrical and Gyne- 
cological Nursing 15 hours 

Nursing Practice 

Nursing 135. Practice in Obstetrical and Gyneco- 
logical Nursing 4 months 

Advanced Course 

Students of at least one year's satisfactory experience in 
nursing and having personal qualifications of maturity, phy- 
sical health, and definiteness of purpose may register for a 
second period of advanced study upon recommendation of 
the faculty of the department. 

Lectures and conferences 75-80 hours 

Required: 

Nursing 191. Ward Teaching 30 hours 

Nursing 132. The Management of Obstetrical 

Units 1 5 hours 

Electives : 

Nursing 192. Supervision in Schools of Nursing 30 hours 

(Available during Spring term only) 

[5] 



Nursing 181. Principles of Surgical Nursing — ■ 

Selected Unit on Operating Room Technique „ 5 hours 

Health Nursing 150. Social & Economic Aspects 

of Health and Disease _ 15 hours 

Health Nursing 151. Community Health 15 hours 

(Offered to group of not less than six) 

Psychology 170. Elementary Psychology 30 hours 

(Available during Winter term only) 
Psychology 171. Development of Behavior in 

Children 30 hours 

(Available during Spring term only) 

Nursing 162. Mental Hygiene 15 hours 

Nursing 160a. Psychiatry _ 30 hours 

Nursing Practice 

Nursing 136. Practice in Ward Management 

and Ward Teaching „ 4 months 

Psychiatric Nursing 

Advisor: Carolyne A. Sprogell, R.N. 

Director of Psychiatric Nursing 
Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic 
Basic Course 

This course is designed for the graduate nurse who de- 
sires knowledge of the underlying organic, functional, and 
social causes of mental illness, and the opportunity to ac- 
quire understanding of the technique and skill in the care 
of mental patients. 

Lectures, clinics and conferences 195 hours 

The first four months: 

Nursing 160a. Psychiatry 30 hours 

Nursing 161a. Principles of Psychiatric Nursing...30 hours 

Nursing 162. Mental Hygiene 15 hours 

Nursing 163. Principles of Special Therapeutics 15 hours 

The second four months: \ 

Health Nursing 150. Social and Economic Aspects 

of Health and Disease 15 hours 

Psychology 171. Development of Behavior of 

Children 30 hours 

(Available during Spring term only) 

Nursing 160b. Psychiatry 15 hours 

Nursing 161 b. Principles of Psychiatric Nursing...l5 hours 

Nursing 191. Ward Teaching 30 hours 

[6] 



Nursing Practice 

Nursing 165. Practice in Psychiatric Nursing 8 months 

Note: Prerequisite for entrance to graduate courses in Psychiatric Nursing 
— A course of 30 hours in Elementary Psychology completed within 
the last three years. Applicants who have had no course in Element- 
ary Psychology but whose student records and experience have been 
above average will be considered for admission for the term begin- 
ning in October only, when Psychology 170 will be available. 

Advanced Course 

Students who have attained a high scholastic standing 
and have manifested a special interest and marked ability 
in the care of the psychiatric patient and who wish to pre- 
pare themselves for positions in psychiatric hospitals may 
register for an advanced period of four months' study in 
psychiatric nursing. 

Lectures, clinics, demonstrations and conferences 60 hours 

Nursing 164. Principles of Advanced Psychiatric 

Nursing 15 hours 

Nursing 167. The Management of Psychiatric 

Units 15 hours 

Nursing 192. Supervision in Schools of Nursing 30 hours 

(Available during Spring term only) 

Nursing Practice 

Nursing 166. Practice in Advanced Psychiatric Nursing 4 months 

Surgical Nursing 

Advisor: Katharine G. Amberson, B.S., R.N. 

Head of Medical and Surgical Nursing 
Instruction and Service 

This course is designed for graduate students who desire 
a broader background in surgical nursing, and who wish 
to acquaint themselves with the more modern methods of 
surgical treatment of diseases. The course is limited to eight 
students admitted every two months. 

Lectures, clinics, demonstrations, and conferences 65 hours 

Nursing 180. Surgery __ 25 hours 

Nursing 181. Principles of Surgical Nursing 25 hours 

Health Nursing 150. Social and Economic Aspects 

of Health and Disease 15 hours 

m 



Nursing Practice 

Nursing 182. Practice in Surgical Nursing 4 months 

Note: A period of two additional months practice may be arranged for 
a limited number of students who have demonstrated their interest 
and fitness for the field chosen. In only one of these two months 
will it be possible to arrange for additional experience in the 
operating room. 

Operating Room Management 

This course, covering a period of six months, is planned 
to prepare a limited number of especially qualified nurses 
to become head nurses or assistant supervisors in a general 
operating room. 

Lectures, clinics, demonstrations, and conferences 100-110 hours 

Required : 

Nursing 191. Ward Teaching 30 hours 

Nursing 183. Practice Teaching of Operative 

Technique 1 5 hours 

Nursing 184. Operating Room Management and 

Supervision 1 5 hours 

Electives: 

Nursing 180. Surgery 25 hours 

Nursing 181. Principles of Surgical Nursing 25 hours 

Nursing 162. Mental Hygiene 15 hours 

Health Nursing 150. Social and Economic Aspects 

of Health and Disease 15 hours 

Nursing Practice 

Nursing 185. Practice in Operating Room Tech- 
nique and Management 6 months 

Description of Courses 
Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing 

Nursing 130. Obstetrics and Gynecology 45 hours 

This course deals with the physiological and pathological changes dur- 
ing pregnancy, labor and the puerperium; the care of the normal 
newborn; the nutrition of the mother and baby; the prevention of 
complications; the social significance of infant and maternal mor- 

[8] 



tality; the relation of obstetrics to various gynecological conditions; 
the results of infection and tumor growth and the required surgical 
interference and operative treatment. 
Lectures and clinics Dr. Stander and staff; Miss Rynhergen 

Nursing 131. Principles of Obstetrical and 

Gynecological Nursing 15 hours 

This course emphasizes the importance of prenatal instruction, obser- 
vation, and care; obstetrical and gynecological nursing procedures 
with particular attention to infections and their special therapy. 
Lectures, demonstrations, and conferences: Miss Hickcox, Miss Klein, 

Miss Treiber, Miss Geuss. 

Nursing 132. The Management of Obstetrical Units 15 hours 

This course deals with housekeeping and managerial problems. It 
includes discussions related to ordering of supplies, care of equip- 
ment, organization of the department, estimations of needed per- 
sonnel, arrangement of schedules and hours of work and assignment 
of duties. 
Conferences: Miss Hickox, Miss Klein, Miss Treiber, Miss Geuss, 

Nursing 135. Practice in Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing, 4 months 
This consists of supervised practice in the nursing procedures involved 
in the care of mothers and infants in the w r ards, nurseries, labor and 
delivery rooms and the out patient department. In connection with 
the practice the student will write case studies, prepare papers on 
special subjects and participate in conferences. 

Miss Hickcox and staff. 

Nursing 136. Practice in Ward Management and 

Ward Teaching 4 months 

Supervised practice in assisting the head nurse in the administration of 
the ward and the conduct of the ward teaching program, with 
emphasis on the particular field in which the student expects to 
function. 

Miss Hickcox and staff. 

Health Nursing 

Health Nursing 150. Social and Economic Aspects of Health 

and Disease 15 hoins 

A course of study dealing with the prevention of sickness and the 
promotion of health with emphasis upon the social and economic 
factors in the home and in the community. 
Lectures and conferences Miss Frost 

Health Nursing 151. Community Health 15 hours 

This course considers the aims and scope of public health activities 

[9] 



and the part of the nurse in this program. The relationship between 
the hospital and other health and social agencies of the community 
is emphasized. (Offered to group of not less than six.) 
Lectures and conferences „„ Miss Frost 

Psychiatric Nursing 

Nursing 160a-160b. Psychiatry „ 45 hours 

This course deals with psychopathic conditions, their prevalence, social 
aspects, etiology, pathology, treatment, and prevention. 

Lectures and clinics Dr. Amsden, Dr. Henry, 

Dr. Greenacre and staff. 

Nursing 161a-161b. Principles of Psychiatric Nursing 45 hours 

This course deals with the basic principles in the nursing care of 
psychiatric patients and the nursing procedures used in their treat- 
ments. Emphasis is placed upon the relation between mental and 
physical illness and the effects of child behavior on future adult life. 
Lectures, clinics, demonstrations, and conferences: 

Miss Sprogell, Miss Knox, Miss Corrigan and staff 

Nursing 162. Mental Hygiene , 15 hours 

A course of study designed to acquaint the student with the origin, 
development, and growth of the mental hygiene movement, em- 
phasizing the need and importance for psychiatric clinics, child 
guidance clinics and community education. 

Lectures Dr. Greenacre and staffs of Out Patient Department, 

Social Service and Nursery School. 

Nursing 163. Principles of Special Therapeutics 15 hours 

This course gives the student an understanding of the use of occupa- 
tional therapy and physiotherapy in the care of mentally ill patients. 

Lectures and conferences Miss Gunderson, Miss Hibbler, 

and Mr. Lawson. 

Nursing 164. Principles of Advanced Psychiatric Nursing 15 hours 

A course designed for those students who have had the basic course, 
and who wish to study special projects in psychiatric nursing. Stu- 
dents will prepare special behavior studies to be presented at student 
conferences. 
Clinics and conferences Miss Sprogell, Miss Knox, and staff. 

Nursing 165. Practice in Psychiatric Nursing 8 months 

This course consists of supervised practice in the care of the psychiatric 
patient, which includes experience in the special departments as: 
out patient department, adults and children, occupational, recrea- 
tional and hydrotherapy departments. It also includes a period of 

[10] 



supervised observation and practice in the Payne Whitney Nursery 
School. 

Miss Sprogell, Miss Knox, and staff. 

Nursing 166. Practice in Advanced Psychiatric Nursing 4 months 

This course includes supervised practice in assisting the head nurse in 
the administration of the floor, and assisting in the conduct of the 
ward teaching program. 

Miss Sprogell, Miss Knox, and staff. 

Nursing 167. The Management of Psychiatric Units 15 hours 

This course deals with housekeeping and managerial problems. It 
includes discussions related to ordering of supplies, care of equip- 
ment, organization of the department, estimations of needed per- 
sonnel, arrangement of schedules and hours of work and assignment 
of duties. 

Miss Sprogell, Miss Knox, Miss Corrigan. 

Psychology 

Psychology 170. Elementary Psychology 30 hours 

An introduction to the study of human behavior and the underlying 
principles of mental adjustments and habit formation. An effort 
will be made to apply this study to the adjustment of the student 
to her environment and to the better understanding of the adjust- 
ment of patients to their illnesses. (Available during Winter term 

only.) 

Lectures and conferences Miss Kennedy. 

Psychology 171. Development of Behavior of Children 30 hours 

A study of the normal child and his behavior. The susceptibility of 
the child's behavior responses to the various details of family life 
and of school will be emphasized. (Available during Spring term 

only.) 

Lectures and conferences Professor Whitley. 

Surgical Nursing 

Nursing 1 80. Surgery 25 hours 

This course includes a brief survey of a number of the special fields in 
surgery and the more recent developments in the surgical treatment 
of diseases. Emphasis is placed upon signs, symptoms, and observa- 
tions which should be made both preceding and following operations 
as well as upon essential points related to the physical care of the 
patient. 

Lectures and clinics Dr. Heuer and staff 

[in 



Nursing 181. Principles of Surgical Nursing „ 25 hours 

This course treats of the principles underlying the nursing care of 
surgical patients and affords an opportunity for observation and 
discussion of new ways of applying these principles. A review of 
operating room technique is included. 
Lectures, demonstrations, and conferences: 

Miss Amberson, Miss Moser, Miss Keller, 
Miss Grainger, Mrs. Ray. 

Nursing 182. Practice in Surgical Nursing 4 months 

Supervised practice is provided in the following services: general sur- 
gery, urology, out patient, general operating room. 

Miss Amberson, Miss Banfield, and staffs. 

Nursing 183. Practice Teaching of Operative Technique 15 hours 

This course provides students with the opportunity to conduct classes 
following the preparation of an outline and lesson plans in connec- 
tion with the course in Ward Teaching. 

Miss Amberson, Mrs. Ray, Miss Fremd. 

Nursing 184. Operating Room Management and Supervision 15 hours 

This course deals with the care and ordering of supplies and the care 
of rooms. It includes discussions related to organization of the 
department, estimations of needed personnel, arranging of schedules 
of cases and hours of work, assignment of duties and participation 
in the plans for student teaching and the general supervision of the 
operating suite. 
Conferences Mrs. Ray 

Nursing 185. Practice in Operating Room 

Technique and Management 6 months 

The practice in operating room management includes observation, cir- 
culation, assisting at the operating table, night service, and responsi- 
bility for one operating room. The student will also have experience 
in assisting with the supervision of student practice and the general 
administration of all of the general operating rooms. 

Miss Amberson, Mrs. Ray, Miss Fremd. 

Nursing 191. Ward Teaching 30 hours 

This course deals with the principles of learning and teaching and 
emphasizes learning activities and teaching methods. The confer- 
ence method is analysed and studied as the chief method in ward 
teaching. Students prepare lesson plans and demonstrate this method 
of instruction. 
Lectures and conferences „ Miss Kennedy. 

Nursing 192. Supervision in Schools of Nursing > 30 hours 

[12] 



This course considers supervision from the administrative and educa- 
tional aspects. The principles of inspection, teaching, guidance, and 
research as they relate to supervision in schools of nursing are dis- 
cussed. The student plans programs of supervision in her special 
field and selects one subject for research to cover a four months 
period. (Available during Spring term only.) 

Lectures and conferences _ _ „ _ Miss Kennedy. 



[13] 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS OF THE 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Anna D. Wolf, M.A., R.N. 

Director of the School of Nursing, 
Director of the Nursing Service. 

Irene H. Sutliffe, R.N. 

Directress Emeritus. 
Harriet Frost, R.N. 

Associate Director, School of Nursing, 

Director, Public Health Nursing. 

May Kennedy, M.A., R.N. 

Associate Director, School of Nursing, 
Director of Pedagogy. 

Katharine G. Amberson, B.S., R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing, 

Head of Medical and Surgical Nursing Instruction and Services. 

Gertrude S. Banfield, B.A., R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing, 

Head of Out Patient Nursing Instruction and Services. 

Verda F. Hickcox, B.S., R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing, 
Head of Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing Instruction 
and Services. 

Sarah E. Moore, R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing, 
Administrative Assistant, Nursing Service. 

Agnes Schubert, M.A., R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing, 

Head of Pediatric Nursing Instruction and Service. 

Carolyne A. Sprogell, R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing, 
Director of Psychiatric Nursing, 
Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic. 

[14] 






THE SOCIETY OF THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 



THE 

NEW YORK HOSPITAL 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 



ANNOUNCEMENT 
1936 - 1937 



VOLUME V 



NUMBER I 



If after reading this bulletin there are 

further questions, please write to the Director 

of the School of Nursing. An application will 

be sent upon request if an applicant is able 

to satisfy the entrance requirements. 




THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL SOUTH VIEW 



THE SOCIETY OF THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 

THE 

NEW YORK HOSPITAL 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Associated with Cornell University 




Announcement 

1 93 6 • l 937 



Volume v 



Number i 



CALENDAR 



1936 

September 26 .... Matriculation and Registration (First 

year students) 

September 28 Winter Term begins — Classes convene 

October 12 Columbus Day (Not observed by first 

year students) 

November 3 Election Day (Not observed by first year 

students) 

November 26-29 . . . Thanksgiving Recess (First year stu- 
dents) 

November 26 .... Thanksgiving Day — A holiday 

December 24) ... . Christmas Vacation (First year stu- 

January 3 / dents) 

December 25 Christmas Day — A holiday 

1937 

January 1 New Year's Day — A holiday 

January 4 Classes convene 

January 17 Winter Term ends 

January 18 Spring Term begins — Classes convene 

February 12 Lincoln's Birthday — A holiday 

February 22 Washington's Birthday — A holiday 

May 9 Spring Term ends 

May 10 Summer Term begins — Classes convene 

May 30 Memorial Day — A holiday 

July 4 Independence Day — A holiday 

September 6 Labor Day — A holiday 

September 25 Matriculation and Registration (First 

year students) 
September 26 Summer Term ends 

(Four weeks' vacation and three weeks' vacation 
within the summer term for second and first year 
students respectively; two weeks' vacation for 
third year students during psychiatric assignment.) 

September 27 Winter Term begins — Classes convene 

No classes will be held on the above noted holidays. 



HISTORY AND GENERAL STATEMENT 



General Information 

THE New York Hospital, the second oldest hospital in 
America, maintained by private endowment, received its 
charter of incorporation under George the Third of England on 
the thirteenth day of June, 1 77 1, under the title of the Society 
of the Hospital in the City of New York in America. Subse- 
quently by an Act of the Legislature in 18 10 the title was 
changed to The Society of The New York Hospital. 

The first systematic training for nurses, through lectures and 
practical instruction on the wards, was begun in 1799 under the 
direction and tutelage of Dr. Valentine Seaman and continued 
throughout his association with the hospital until 18 17. The 
school of nursing was established in 1877 at which time the first 
class was admitted. Since then more than fourteen hundred stu- 
dents have been graduated many of whom are to be found in 
important positions of administration and teaching in schools 
of nursing and in public health organizations as well as in the 
field of private nursing. 

In June 1927 the New York Hospital formed an association 
with the Cornell University Medical College. The resources of 
each institution w r ere increased and an extensive program of 
building was begun. 

The new plant situated on York Avenue between Sixty-eighth 
and Seventy-first Streets was opened September 1932 and offers 
unusual opportunities and facilities for the progressive develop- 
ment of the school of nursing. The hospital with a potential 
capacity of one thousand beds cares for all types of patients 
including medical, surgical, obstetrical, gynecological, pediatric 
and psychiatric, and the out-patient department provides ample 
opportunity for the study of ambulatory patients. 

A special building for the school of nursing is adjacent to the 
hospital buildings. It provides adequate and well equipped class- 
rooms, laboratories, library and recreation rooms as well as at- 

[ 3 ] 



tractive and comfortable living accommodations for the students 
and faculty. 

Further necessary laboratory and library facilities are avail- 
able through association with the Cornell University Medical 
College. 

Affiliation is made with the Henry Street Visiting Nurse Ser- 
vice for field experience in public health nursing and with the 
Maternity Center Association and the Lobenstine Clinic for ob- 
servation in obstetrical nursing. 

The social service department of the New York Hospital 
participates in the nursing program by the integration of social 
service throughout the entire course of study. 

The school of nursing is registered with the Regents of New 
York State which permits its graduates to take the state board 
examinations in order to secure state registration. 

The hospital is approved by the American College of Sur- 
geons, approved for internships by the American Medical Asso- 
ciation and is a member of the American Hospital Association. 

Requirements for Admission 

The matriculation requirement is satisfactory graduation from 
an accredited high school or recognized preparatory school in 
which the following units of study have been taken : 

English 4 units 

History i unit 

Civics y 2 unit 

Mathematics 2 units 

(Algebra 1 unit; plane geometry 1 unit) 
Science 2 units 

(Chemistry required; physics advised) 
Foreign Language 3 units 

(Three units of one language or two in 

each of two) 
Electives 3^ units 

Total 16 units 

[ 4 ] 



Emphasis is placed upon scholarship of applicants. Preference 
in admission will be given to those who have had advanced study. 
It is advised that prospective students from college have intro- 
ductory chemistry, zoology or biology, physics and psychology. 
All students should review arithmetic prior to admission. 

Besides these scholastic admission requirements students 
should be at least nineteen and not over thirty years of age and 
must present evidence of physical and personal fitness for nursing. 

Exceptions to these matriculation requirements may be made 
only by offering substitutions satisfactory to the Committee on 
Admissions. 

A personal conference of the student and her parent or guard- 
ian with the Director of the School of Nursing is desirable and 
should be arranged after formal application has been submitted 
to the school. An appointment for an interview will be made 
upon request. 

All applications for admission should be addressed to the 
Director of the School of Nursing, 525 East Sixty-eighth Street, 
New York, New York. 

Requirements for Non-Citizens 

According to the law of New York State every person ad- 
mitted to the examination for license as registered nurse in 
New York State at the termination of her course of study must 
submit evidence that she is a citizen of the United States or has 
declared her intention of becoming such a citizen. The New 
York Hospital School of Nursing therefore requires that an 
applicant fulfill these requirements prior to entrance to the 
school. 

Advanced Standing 

Advanced standing may be granted those students who pre- 
sent credentials showing satisfactory completion of courses of 
study taken in other schools deemed of similar or equal value 
to those given in the New York Hospital School of Nursing. 

[ 5 ] 



An applicant who has received her baccalaureate degree may 
have her time in the school reduced by two or four months if 
she maintains a scholastic standing of an average of "B" grade 
in the first and second years provided this request is presented 
the last term of the second year. 

Accrediting by Cornell University 

To those students who may later wish to matriculate at the 
New York State College of Home Economics, Cornell Uni- 
versity, if they present all other necessary requirements, the 
curriculum of the New York Hospital School of Nursing will 
be credited to the amount of not less than forty-five hours, which 
is equivalent to one and a half academic years of college credit, 
toward the Bachelor of Science degree. 

The Curriculum 

The three-year curriculum of the school of nursing is so 
planned as to give each student a thorough understanding of 
the basic sciences and principles underlying good nursing and 
of the best methods to use in the care of the sick, in the pre- 
vention of disease, and in health education. 

Each of the three school years is divided into terms of six- 
teen weeks each. 

During the first term and a half limited nursing practice is 
given in the pavilions of the hospital and the clinics of the out- 
patient department while a greater amount of time is spent in 
class and laboratory. In the subsequent seven and one-half terms 
the student's nursing practice increases in length of time and 
in responsibility and a sequence is planned to include the various 
types of clinical services during day, evening and night periods 
in order that the student may acquire complete understanding 
of patients' needs. 

During these clinical terms each student is scheduled forty- 
eight hours per week which includes all class and nursing prac- 
tice assignments. 

[ 6] 



Requirements of Scholarship and Graduation 

Students will be graded in their studies on a basis of weighted 
quality points with an average of two quality points required 
for promotion and graduation. 

The following grading system has been established: 

A — Excellent 4 quality points 

B — Good 3 quality points 

C — Average 2 quality points 

D — Pass 1 quality point 

F — Failure 1 quality point 

I — Incomplete . . . Given in cases of absence and 

not because of poor scholarship 

Failure in any given subject may necessitate withdrawal from 
the school unless the student's scholarship is exceptional in other 
respects in which case repetition of the course may be recom- 
mended by the instructor. 

Fees 

Matriculation Fee $10.00 

Payable at first registration; not refunded. 

Tuition Fee 60.00 

Payable at first registration; not refunded after 
second week for any cause of withdrawal. 

Laboratory Fee 10.00 

Payable at first registration; not refunded. 

Health Service Fee 5.00 

Payable at first registration; not refunded. 

Chemistry Laboratory Breakage Fee .... 5.00 
Payable at first registration; amount not used for* 
breakage to be refunded or excess breakage to be 
paid. 

[ 7 ] 



Graduation Fee 15.00 

Payable at beginning of third term, third year. Re- 
funded if student is not graduated. 

Total Fees for New York Hospital School of 

Nursing $105.00 

Tuition Fee for Henry Street Visiting Nurse 

Service 25.00 

Total $130.00 

In addition to above fees students pay a Student Activity Fee 
of $5.00 each year which is collected by the class Treasurer. 

Maintenance and General Expense 

Room, board and limited laundry are provided each student 
while she is in the school. 

First-year students must furnish their own aprons and bibs, 
purchased through the school of nursing at a cost of approxi- 
mately sixteen dollars. Except for these all uniforms are fur- 
nished each student during her course of study. 

The cost of text books, expenses incurred for observation, 
educational supplies and miscellaneous articles largely deter- 
mined by personal requirements must be borne by each student. 
These may be estimated to amount to approximately seventy- 
five dollars annually. 

For the three-year course it is estimated that the total cost 
to the student will be approximately three hundred and fifty 
dollars. 

A list of limited necessary personal equipment will be sent 
each prospective student when her application is accepted. 

» Registration and Orientation 

First-year students entering in the fall of nineteen hundred 
and thirty-six must register at the school by noon on Saturday, 

[ 8 ] • 



J 









September twenty-sixth; those entering in the fall of nineteen 
hundred and thirty-seven by noon on Saturday, September 
twenty-fifth. 

A brief orientation program precedes formal instruction. 
During this time students take required psychological tests and 
an arithmetic pre-test, have necessary physical examinations with 
Schick, Dick and Mantoux tests, confer with faculty advisers 
and secure uniforms, books and other equipment. 

Health Regulations and Service 

The school of nursing maintains a health service for its stu- 
dents. A well equipped infirmary with necessary staff is pro- 
vided in the nurses' residence. A physical examination by the 
school physician with chest x-rays is required upon admission to 
the school and subsequent annual physical examinations will be 
given. 

Vaccinations against typhoid fever and smallpox will be re- 
quested of all students before admission to the school. Schick 
and Dick tests and immunization for positive reactions will be 
required of all students before or after admission to the school. 
Mantoux tests will be given during the pre-clinical period and 
for those who are negative will be repeated at regular intervals. 

Infirmary care for minor illnesses will be limited to four 
weeks at any one time in the case of all students. For more seri- 
ous illnesses students will be cared for gratuitously in the hospital 
for not more than two weeks at any one time for the first-year 
students and not more than four weeks at any one time for 
second and third year students. Expenses for special nursing care 
and special therapies will have to be borne by the student or 
her family. 

Vacations and Other Absences 

During the first and second years a vacation of four weeks 
is planned and during the third year one of two weeks. For first- 
year students one week's vacation is given at Christmas (see 
calendar) and three weeks during the summer term. For all 

[ 9 ] 



second-year students a vacation of four weeks is planned dur- 
ing the summer term of the year. For third-year students a two 
weeks' vacation is planned during any one of the three terms. 
This vacation is not given to those students who have an ex- 
emption of time. 

All vacations are arranged by the school of nursing to con- 
form to the requirements of the educational program and the 
fields in which clinical practice is obtained. 

Except for first-year students during their first term holidays 
are observed only in connection with class schedules. 

As a result of absences the repetition of a course of study 
or special examinations may be required; class registration may 
be changed and in necessary instances nursing practice will have 
to be made up. 

Scholarship Aid and Loan Fund 

Scholarship aid is made available to a limited number of 
students who have proven themselves well fitted for the pro- 
fession, have high standards of scholarship and are in financial 
need. A student loan fund has also been established to give 
necessary financial aid to those students who show promise in 
their chosen field. These financial benefits are not available to 
first-year students until after their first term's work. 

Applications for scholarship aid and student loans should be 
made in writing to the Director of the School. 

EXTRA-CURRICULAR OPPORTUNITIES 

Believing that the education of young women today must 
include activities relating to healthful social relationships gen- 
erous provision for this development in the student life of the 
school has been made. 

The beautiful fireproof, sixteen-story residence, erected adja- 
cent to the hospital buildings, is the center for these activities. 
Every effort has been made in its construction to provide for the 
normal and healthy life of students and faculty. 

[10] 



Each of the eight student residence floors contains attractively 
furnished single bedrooms with lavatories, ample common baths, 
showers and toilet facilities, a common sitting-room with ad- 
joining kitchenette for informal gatherings and a laundryette. 

Comfortable lounges, reading, reception and dining-rooms are 
on the first and ground floors. 

For further recreational activities, a large well equipped gym- 
nasium, billiard-room, game-room and porches are available. 
Arrangements for the use of an outdoor playground and an 
indoor swimming pool are made. 

To insure the full benefit and proper use of these facilities 
well qualified instructors are appointed to direct the social and 
recreational activities of the school. 

School Government 

The school of nursing has a cooperative government in which 
the students take an active part. A student organization has 
been established and works actively with the Faculty Committee 
on Student Affairs in all matters relating to social and profes- 
sional conduct and discipline. 

An annual student activities fee of five dollars is required and 
collected by each class. 



[ii] 



THE CURRICULUM 



First Year 



Class and Approximate 
Laboratory Hours Credit 
Hours Practice Hours 



Preclinical Biology (Anatomy, Chemis- 
try and Physiology) 165 

Bacteriology and Pathology .... 66 

History of Nursing 30 

Elementary Psychology 30 

Psychology of Deviate Behavior . . 15 

Nursing Principles and Practice . . 140 

Nursing Ethics 15 

Nutrition and Cookery 30 

Diet Therapy 30 

Social and Economic Aspects of Health 

and Disease 30 

Materia Medica 30 

Medicine 35 

Communicable Diseases 25 

Medical Nursing 15 

Surgery 45 

Surgical Nursing 15 

(Orientation — 22 hours — no credit, in- 
cludes Personal Hygiene — 8 hours) 



300 



Totals 



716 



480 

480 

1260 



6 

2 
2 
2 
1 
6 
1 

1/2 

2 
2 



44 



[12] 



Second Year 

Class and Approximate 

Laboratory Hours 

Hours Practice 

Medical Nursing 192 

Diet Therapy Practice 192 

Operative Technique 15 369 

Pediatrics 30 ... 

Pediatric Nursing 30 708 

Obstetrics and Gynecology .... 45 ... 

Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing 15 708 

Development of Behavior in Children 30 ... 

Totals 165 2169 



Credit 
Hours 

1/2 

1/2 

4 
1Y2 

8/2 

3 

7 
2 

29 



Third Year 








Medical Nursing 


8 


280 


2/2 


Diet Therapy Practice 




96 


1 


Surgical Nursing 


8 


376 


3/2 


Emergency Nursing 


16 




1 


Psychiatry 


- 45 




3 


Psychiatric Nursing 


• 30 


547 


6 


Special Therapeutics 


. . . 


146 


1 


Family and Community Health 


20 


. . . 


1 


Community Nursing Practice 


. . . 


384 


3 


Out Patient Nursing Practice 




192 


2 


Private Patient Nursing Practice . 




192 


2 


Professional Adjustments 


15 




1 


Totals 


142 


2213 


27 


Grand Total Hours and Credits . 


1023 


5642 


100 



[13] 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

Preclinical Biology 

The course will be introduced by a review of some of the ele- 
mentary aspects of anatomy, chemistry and physiology. The 
main part of the course will be concerned with the structural, 
functional and chemical operations of the body with as close a 
correlation of these different view-points as the material studied 
will permit. The subject matter will be presented by lectures and 
demonstrations by the staff and with laboratory experiments and 
dissection by the students. The emphasis of the course will be 
placed on the application of the subject to nursing practice. 

165 Hours, First Year 
Dr. Armstrong and Dr. Gottschall 

Bacteriology and Pathology 

The study of the habits and morphology of microorganisms 
emphasing those of pathogenic character; sources, modes and 
prevention of infection; disinfection and asepsis; the more im- 
portant tissue changes occurring in the healing process, infec- 
tions and neoplasms; clinical microscopy of the blood and blood 
grouping; kidney function and urinalysis. Practical demonstra- 
tions and applications will be made which will relate directly 
to nursing. The blood group of each student will be ascertained 
and recorded. Lectures, recitations and laboratory. 

44 Hours, First Year — Bacteriology 

22 Hours, First Year — Pathology 

Dr. Wheeler, Dr. Stillman and Miss Thomas 

Materia Medica 

A course designed to acquaint the student with the funda- 
mental weights, measures, terms and symbols used in the 
preparation and administration of drugs, common antiseptics, 
disinfectants and other solutions. A study of important and com- 
monly used drugs; their preparation, dosage, administration, 
physiological and therapeutic actions, idiosyncracies, cumulative 
and minor toxic symptoms, antidotes and emergency treatments. 
Emphasis is placed on the accurate administration of drugs and 



the careful observation of their effects through supervised prac- 
tice in nursing courses. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Wilson 

Medical Nursing 

1. Medicine 

Medical aspects of diseases are considered in these lectures 
and clinics. Material presented will supplement, emphasize or 
interpret required reading covering etiology, sources of infec- 
tion, symptomatology, usual course, pathology, complications, 
treatment, prognosis and prevention. 

35 Hours, First Year 
Dr. DuBois and staff 

2. Communicable Diseases 

A study of communicable diseases, including tuberculosis. 

Special emphasis is placed upon etiology, modes of transmission 

and prevention. Lectures and clinics. 

25 Hours, First Year 
Dr. DuBois and staff 

3. Principles of Medical Nursing Including Communicable Dis- 

ease Nursing 
Through lectures, clinics and demonstrations, students are 
taught principles and methods of nursing as applied to the care 
of medical patients. In the third year emphasis is placed upon 
managerial and teaching problems. 

15 Hours, First Year 
8 Hours, Third Year 
Miss Amberson, Miss Wilson and Miss Daum 

4. Practice of Medical Nursing Including Communicable Dis- 

ease Nursing 
Supervised practice and study of the application of medical 
nursing principles and methods to the care of patients on the 
medical pavilions of the hospital. In addition students study and 
practice medical aseptic nursing as related to the care of patients 
suffering from communicable diseases including tuberculosis. 
Practice includes care of patients during day, evening and night. 
Demonstrations and conferences. 

952 Hours, First, Second and Third Years 
(Includes 192 hours of communicable disease nursing) 
Miss Amberson, Miss Wilson, Miss Daum, Miss Kay, 
Miss Bell and staff 

[i5] 



5. Practice in Care of Private Patients 

Application of principles of medical and surgical nursing to 
the care of private patients. 

192 Hours, Third Year 

Miss Moffatt, Miss Emmett and staff 

Nursing 

1. Orientation 

This course is designed to give the beginning student a general 
conception of the field of nursing; the responsibilities and obliga- 
tions of each individual in choosing the profession; the impor- 
tance of general conduct in building up the right habits of living 
and attitudes of the nurse. Includes lectures in personal hygiene 
emphasizing the importance of physical and mental health espe- 
cially as it relates to the life of the nurse and is reflected in her 
work. 

22 Hours, First Year 

No credit 

Miss Wolf, Miss Kennedy, Miss Frost 

2. Principles of Nursing 

A course designed to give the student a basic understanding 
of the principles of nursing with emphasis upon her attitude 
toward her patient, the existing social relationships, the physical 
requirements for the proper care of patients and the procedures 
found most helpful for the promotion of health. 

140 Hours, First Year 
Miss Wyatt 

3. Practice of Elementary Nursing 

The application of the theories of nursing in laboratory prac- 
tice, in the surgical supply room and in the actual care of con- 
valescent patients in the pavilions and out-patient department 
of the hospital. 

300 Hours, First Year 

Miss Wyatt, Miss Zorn and Miss Gaute 

4. History of Nursing 

A survey of the historical development of nursing from its 
early conception to modern times. Lectures and recitations. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Wyatt 

5. Nursing Ethics 

A general consideration of fundamental ethical and phil- 
osophical principles and their application to problems which arise 

[16] 



in the practice of nursing. An attempt will be made to coordinate 
this course closely with each course of nursing practice through 
class discussions of pertinent problems. 

15 Hours, First Year 
Miss Wolf 

6. Professional Adjustments 

Through a general survey of the nursing field, the student has 
an opportunity to learn the trends and advances in the profes- 
sion; the need and opportunities for specialized preparation; the 
importance and types of legislation; the activities of professional 
organizations and the obligations of their members. Lectures 
and recitations. 

15 Hours, Third Year 

Miss Wolf and Special Lecturers 

7. Emergency Nursing 

This course supplements the instruction in nursing and deals 
with the application of these principles to emergency situations 
in the home and community. It demonstrates also the methods 
of teaching first aid to various groups. Lectures and demonstra- 
tions. 

16 Hours, Third Year 
Dr. Redden 

See description of other courses in nursing relating to specific 
clinical fields. 

Nutrition 

1. Nutrition and Cookery 

An elementary course in normal adult human nutrition with 
emphasis upon the preparation and the utilization of food by 
the body in health. The nutrition requirements in childhood and 
pregnancy are taken up during the student's practice on those 
services. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Rynbergen 

2. Diet Therapy 

A course designed to present the underlying principles in treat- 
ment of disease by means of special dietaries given concurrently 
with the lectures in Medical and Surgical Diseases. Lectures, 
recitations and laboratory. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Rynbergen 

[17] 



3. Practice of Diet Therapy 

The application of the principles of diet therapy in super- 
vised practice on the pavilions in the hospital and in the out- 
patient clinic. Conferences and case studies. 

288 Hours, Second and Third Years 

Miss Gillam, Miss Rynbergen and Miss Stimpson 

and staff. 

Obstetrics and Gynecology 

1. Obstetrics and Gynecology 

This course deals with physiological and pathological changes 
during pregnancy, labor, and puerperium; the care of the nor- 
mal newborn; the nutrition of the mother and baby; the pre- 
vention of complications; the social significance of infant and 
maternal mortality; the relation of obstetrics to various gyneco- 
logical conditions; the results of infection and tumor growth and 
the required surgical interference and operative treatment. Lec- 
tures, clinics and conferences. 

45 Hours, Second Year 

Dr. Stander and staff 

Mrs. Mills and Miss Rynbergen 

2. Principles of Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing 

This course emphasizes the importance of prenatal instruc- 
tion, observation and care; infant, obstetrical and gynecological 
nursing procedure with particular attention to infections and 
their special therapy. Classes, demonstrations and conferences. 

15 Hours, Second Year 

Miss Hickcox, Miss Klein, Miss Geuss 

3. Practice of Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing 
Under supervised practice in the pavilions, nurseries, operat- 
ing rooms, labor and delivery rooms, and out-patient depart- 
ment, students have the opportunity to observe and care for 
infants and obstetrical and gynecological patients. Case studies 
and conferences. 

708 Hours, Second Year 

Miss Hickcox, Miss Gould, Miss Klein, 

Miss Geuss and staff 

Pediatrics 
1. Pediatrics 

This course deals with normal growth and development and 
the diseases of infancy and childhood, with emphasis on infant 

[18] 



welfare, prevention of morbidity and mortality and infant nutri- 
tion. Lectures and clinics. 

30 Hours, Second Year 
Dr. Levine and staff 

2. Principles of Pediatric Nursing 

The basic principles in the care of well and sick infants and 
children are given together with the social, educational and nutri- 
tional aspects of their treatment and behavior as normal chil- 
dren. Classes, conferences and demonstrations. 

30 Hours, Second Year 

Miss Schubert, Miss Gould, Miss Boquist, Miss Sykes 

3. Practice of Pediatric Nursing 

This consists of supervised experience in aseptic nursing meth- 
ods in the care of infants and children in the pavilion, formula 
laboratory, premature nursery, out-patient department and nur- 
sery school. Case studies and conferences. 
708 Hours, Second Year 

Miss Schubert, Miss Gould, Miss Boquist, Miss Sykes, 
Miss Nason, Miss Johnson, Miss Correll and staff 

4. Development of Behavior in Children 

A study of the normal child and his behavior. The suscepti- 
bility of the child's behavior responses to the various details of 
family life and of school will be emphasized. Lectures and reci- 
tations. 

30 Hours, Second Year 
Professor Whitley 



Personal Hygiene and Public Health 

1. Personal Hygiene 

(8 hours — Included in Orientation Course.) 

2. Physical Education 

Each student will be required to participate in regular physical 
exercise designed primarily to maintain positive health with 
emphasis upon posture and corrective measures and to stimulate 
sportsmanship. 

128 Hours, First Year 

64 Hours, Second and Third Years 

Miss McDermott and Miss Anderson 

[ i9] 



3- Social and Economic Aspects of Health and Disease 

A course of study given concurrently with the lectures on 
medical diseases emphasizing their social and economic aspects. 
It deals with the prevention of sickness and the promotion of 
health, with consideration of the contributing factors in home 
and community. Lectures and conferences. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Frost 

4. Family and Community Health 

A course of study given as preparation for practice in com- 
munity nursing. It considers the underlying principles of public 
health nursing; the aims and scope of health activities both pub- 
lic and private. Lectures, conferences, family case studies. 

20 Hours, Third Year 
Miss Frost 

5. Community Nursing Principles and Practice 

Supervised nursing practice in the out-patient department and 
in the home through affiliation with Henry Street Visiting Nurse 
Service. Contact with the home and observation of community 
agencies is also furnished in the out-patient department through 
the social service department and the tuberculosis district. 

384 Hours, Third Year 

Henry Street, Visiting Nurse Service 

Miss Wales and staff 

192 Hours, Third Year 

Medical and Surgical Out-Patient Department 

Miss Frost, Miss Banfield, Miss Gould and staff 

Miss Josephi and staff 



Psychiatry 
1. Psychiatry 

A course of study designed to acquaint students with psycho- 
pathic conditions, their etiology, pathology and treatment. In- 
cluded in this course is an historical survey of psychiatry and 
the mental hygiene movement, a discussion of the problems most 
frequently found in the different periods of human develop- 
ment: nursery school age, pre-puberty, adolescent, climactic and 
senile. An introduction to the techniques and social agencies 
available in helping people meet their problems. 

45 Hours, Third Year 
Dr. Diethelm and staff 

[20] 






2. Principles of Psychiatric Nursing 

This course is organized to give students an understanding 
of the basic principles in the nursing care of psychopathic pa- 
tients and the nursing procedures used in their treatment. 
Emphasis is placed also upon the relation of mental illness to 
physical illness and of early development to future adult life. 
Lectures, demonstrations and clinics. 

30 Hours, Third Year 

Miss Sprogell, Mrs. Gibson and staff 

3. Practice of Psychiatric Nursing 

The application of the principles of psychiatric nursing 
through supervised practice in and conferences on the care of 
children and adults in the in-patient and out-patient depart- 
ments. Behavior studies and case studies. 

547 Hours, Third Year 

Mrs. Gibson, Miss Joinville, Miss Lewis and staff 

4. Special Therapeutics 

An opportunity is given the student to observe the application 
of hydrotherapy, occupational and recreational therapies to the 
needs of the individual patient. Conferences and supervised prac- 

146 Hours, Third Year 

Miss Gunderson, Miss Hibbler and Mr. Lawson 

Psychology 

1. Elementary Psychology 

An introduction to the study of human behavior and the un- 
derlying principles of mental adjustments and habit formation. 
An effort is made to apply this study to the adjustment of the 
student to her own personality as it affects her professional life 
and to the better understanding of the adjustment of patients to 
their illnesses. Recitations and lectures. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Kennedy 

2. Psychology of Deviate Behavior 

Consideration of mental hygiene and a study of the deviations 
from usual behavior in adults and children to an understanding 
of such adjustments patients may profitably make to their ill- 
nesses. Lectures, recitations and clinics. 

15 Hours, First Year 
Miss Kennedy 
Development of Behavior of Children (See Pediatrics) 

[21] 



Surgical Nursing 
i. Surgery 

Surgical aspects of diseases are presented in these lectures and 
clinics. Factors determining the need for surgical interference 
are discussed and the major steps in the operation outlined. 
Special emphasis is placed upon signs, symptoms and observa- 
tions which should be made both preceding and following opera- 
tion as well as upon points which should be stressed in nursing 
these patients. 

45 Hours, First Year 
Dr. Heuer and staff 

2. Principles of Surgical Nursing 

Through lectures, clinics and demonstrations students are 
taught the principles and methods of surgical asepsis and the 
nursing of surgical patients. In the third year emphasis is placed 
upon managerial and teaching problems. 

15 Hours, First Year 
8 Hours, Third Year 
Miss Amberson, 
Miss Keller, Miss Grainger, Miss Hills 

3. Practice of Surgical Nursing 

Supervised practice and study of the application of surgical 
nursing principles to the care of pre-operative and post-opera- 
tive patients on surgical pavilions of the hospital. Practice in- 
cludes care of patients during the day, evening and night. Dem- 
onstrations and conferences. 

856 Hours, First and Third Years 

Miss Amberson, Miss Keller, Miss Grainger, 

Miss Kay, Miss Hills, Miss Bell and staff 

4. Operative Technique 

This course is designed to give thorough preparation and to 
develop skill in surgical aseptic technique; to develop alertness 
to observations of significant changes in patients during the ad- 
ministration of anaesthetics; to develop dexterity and intelligent 
response in assisting with operations and in meeting emer- 
gencies in the general operating room and gynecological operat- 
ing room. 

15 Hours, lectures, demonstrations and conferences 
369 Hours, practice — Second Year 
Miss Amberson, Mrs. Ray, Miss Fremd and Miss Jensen 

[22] 






The Society of the New York Hospital 

GOVERNORS 

Bronson Wixthrop Treasurer 

Augustine J. Smith Secretary 

Henry W. DeForest G. Beekman Hoppix George F. Baker 

Hexry G. Barbey R. Horace Gallatix Barklie McKee Hexry 

Corxelius N. Buss Joseph H. Choate, Jr. Laxgdon P. Marvix 

Paul Tuckermax Fraxk L. Polk H. Williamsox Pell 

William Woodward Johx Hay Whitxey George T. Bowdoin 

Arthur Iselix William V. Astor Robert Wixthrop 



Administrator in Chief 

Murray S argent 



Assistant to the Secretary 
Bruce Laxcaster 



Assistant to the Treasurer 
Walter J. Nichols 



Custodian 
United States Trust Company of New York 



Superintendent, New York Hospital 

R. Roger Hannon, M.D. 



Council of the School of Nursing 

Barklie McKee Henry, Acting Chairman 
Livingston Farrand, M.D. Mary M. Roberts, R.N. 

Augustine J. Smith Flora Rose 

Murray Sargent Eugene F. DuBois, M.D. 

Mary Beard, R.N. Henricus J. Stander, M.D. 

Anna D. Wolf, R.N. 



Alumnae Committee of the School of Nursing 

Mary Beard, Chairman 
Irene Sutliffe, Annie W. Goodrich, 

Honorary Member Vice-President 

Lydia E. Anderson Anna L. Reutinger 

Minnie H. Jordan Lillian D. Wald 

[23] 



OFFICERS OF 
ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY 

Anna D. Wolf, M.A., R.N. 

Director of the School of Nursing 
and Director of the Nursing Service 

B.A. Goucher College, 1911; Diploma in Nursing, The Johns Hopkins 
Hospital School for Nurses, 1915; M.A. Teachers College, Columbia 
University, 191 6; Robb Fellow, Teachers College, Columbia University, 
1925-1926; Instructor and Assistant Superintendent of Nurses, The Johns 
Hopkins Hospital School for Nurses, 1916-1919; Instructor of Nursing, 
Vassar Training Camp for Nurses, Summer 191 8; Superintendent of 
Nurses, Peking Union Medical College, Peking, China, 19 19-1924; Dean 
of the School of Nursing, ibid., 1924-1925; Associate Professor of Nursing 
and Superintendent of Nurses, The University Clinics, The University 
of Chicago, 1926- 1929; Associate Professor of Nursing and Director of 
Nursing, ibid., 1929-193 1 ; Director of the School of Nursing and Director 
of the Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1931-. 

Irene H. Sutliffe 

Directress Emeritus, School of 
Nursing 

Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1880; 
Organized Hamot Hospital, Erie, Pennsylvania; Organized School for 
Nurses, Long Island College Hospital, Brooklyn ; Directress of Nurses, 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1886- 1902; Charge of Nursing 
Service, Camp Black, during Spanish-American War ; Organized Infantile 
Paralysis Emergency Hospital, New York, 191 6; Directress Emeritus, 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932- ; Member of the Society 
of the New York Hospital, 1932; Honorary Member of the Alumnae 
Committee of the New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-. 

Harriet Frost, R.N. 

Associate Director, School of Nursing; 
Director, Public Health Nursing 

Diploma in Nursing, St. John's Hospital, Yonkers, 1906; Course in Public 
Health Nursing, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1915-1916; As- 
sistant Superintendent and Superintendent of Nurses, St. John's Hospital, 
1908-1910; Superintendent, Mercer Hospital, Trenton, 1913-1915; Direc- 
tor, Department of Instruction, Visiting Nurse Society, Philadelphia, 19 16- 
1932; Supervisor, Public Health Nursing Department, Pennsylvania 
School of Social and Health Work, 1919-1932; Associate Director, New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932- ; Director, Public Health Nurs- 
ing, ibid., 1 932-. 

[24] 



May Kennedy, M.A., R.N. 

Associate Director, School of Nursing; 
Director of Pedagogy 

Diploma in Nursing, St. Joseph's Hospital, Chicago, 1907; B.S. Teachers 
College, Columbia University, 1917 ; M.A. University of Chicago, 1932; 
Chief Nurse, Illinois State Hospitals, 1907-1918; General Staff Nurse and 
Chief Nurse, American Expeditionary Forces, France, 19 18-19 19; Super- 
intendent of Nurses, Indianapolis City Hospital, 1919-1920; Director of 
Nursing and Director of Illinois State School of Psychiatric Nursing, 
Illinois Department of Public Welfare, 19201932; Lecturer, University 
of Chicago, Summer Quarters, 1928-1931; Director of Institutes, 1922- ; 
Lecturer, University of Wisconsin, one semester, 1931-1932; Lecturer, 
De Paul University, Summer Session, 1929; Associate Director, New 
York Hospital School of Nursing 1932- ; Director, Pedagogy, ibid., 1932-. 



[25] 



ASSISTANT DIRECTORS 

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS & MEMBERS 

OF OTHER HOSPITAL DEPARTMENTS* 

Katharine G. Amberson, B.S., R.N.** 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing; 
Head of Medical and Surgical Nursing 
Instruction and Services 

Diploma in Nursing, The Johns Hopkins Hospital School for Nurses, 
191 9; B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1930 ; Night Super- 
visor, Harriet Lane Home, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 19 19; Assistant 
Supervisor, Out-Patient Department, ibid., 1919-1920; General Staff 
Nurse, Battle Harbor Hospital, Labrador, Summers, 1919, 1920 ; General 
Staff Nurse and Head Nurse, Rockefeller Institute Hospital, 1920-1923; 
Superintendent of Nurses and Director of Nursing School, Ogden Mills 
School of Nursing, Trudeau Sanatorium, 1923-1928; Instructor and 
Executive Secretary, Nursing Education Department, Teachers College, 
Columbia University, 1 930- 1932; Assistant Director, New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1932- ; Head of Medical and Surgical Nursing In- 
struction and Services, New York Hospital, 1932- 1936. 

Charlotte S. Argabrite, R.N. 

Administrative Assistant, Evening 
Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Bellevue Hospital School of Nursing, 1907; Charge, 
Surgical Supply Room, Bellevue Hospital, 1907-1908; Private Duty 1909- 
1913; Night Supervisor, Bellevue Hospital, 1913-1914; First Assistant 
Superintendent of Nurses, Bellevue Hospital, 191 4; Superintendent of 
Nurses, Hinton Hospital, Hinton, West Virginia, 1914-1915; Acting 
Superintendent of Nurses, Columbia Hospital, Washington, D. C, 191 7; 
Superintendent of Nurses, Harlem Hospital, 1917-1918; Private Duty, 
19 19-1930; Registrar, District Registry for Nurses, 1931-1932; Registrar, 
Bellevue Alumnae Register, 1932-1934; Administrative Assistant, Night 
Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1935; Administrative Assistant, 
Evening Nursing Service, ibid., 1936-. 

Gertrude S. Banfield, B.A., R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing; 
Head of Out-Patient Nursing Instruc- 
tion and Service 

B.A. Vassar, 191 8; Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of 
Nursing, New York, 1920; Assistant Head Nurse, Medical Ward, Pres- 



* Arranged alphabetically. 
** Resigned as of August 1, 1936. 



[26] 



byterian Hospital, New York, 1920; General Staff Nurse and Head 
Nurse, Out-Patient Department, Peking Union Medical College, Peking, 
China, 1921-1924; Supervisor, Max Epstein Clinics, The University of 
Chicago Clinics, 1927-193 1 ; Assistant Director, New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, 1932- ; Head of Out-Patient Nursing Instruction and Service, 
New York Hospital, 1932-. 

Halcie M. Boyer, PhB., R.N. 

Administrative Assistant, Night Nursing Service 

Special Certificate, Kansas State Teachers College, 1921 ; Diploma in 
Nursing, Illinois Training School for Nurses, 1928; Post-Graduate 
Course, Chicago Lying-in Hospital, 1930; PhB. The University of Chi- 
cago, 1935; Special Courses in the Department of Nursing Education, 
University of Chicago, 1935; Teacher, Kansas Public Schools, 1918-1924; 
Head Nurse, Woman's Surgical Ward, Cook County Hospital, 1928; Gen- 
eral Staff Nurse, The University of Chicago Clinics, 1928-193 1 ; Super- 
visor, Obstetrical Department and Instructor, Obstetrical Nursing, 
Deaconess Hospital, Buffalo, 1 931 -1932; Instructor, Obstetrical Nursing 
and Supervisor, Labor and Delivery Rooms, New York Hospital, 1932- 
1933; Evening Supervisor, Medical and Surgical Nursing Service, ibid., 
I 933 _I 935; Administrative Assistant, Night Nursing Service, New York 
Hospital, 1 936-. 

Florence Eaton, B.A. 

Director, Payne Whitney 
Nursery School 

B.A. Colby, 191 8; Part-time Student, Columbia University, 191 8; Stu- 
dent, Long}- School of Music, Boston, 1921-1922; Part-time Student, 
Harvard Graduate School of Education and Boston University, 1923- 
1924; Diploma, Nursery Training School of Boston, 1925; Student, 
Summer Session, London Academy of Music, 1931 ; Director, Cambridge 
Nursery School, 1925-1932; Assistant Director and Director, Pre-School 
Summer Camps, 1924, 1927, 1932, 1934, l 935> Assistant Director, 
Nursery Training School of Boston, Summer, 1925; Instructor in Music, 
ibid., 1927-1932; Children's Supervisor, Vassar Summer Institute of 
Euthenics, 1928; Director, Out-Patient Nursery School, Payne Whitney 
Clinic, New York Hospital, 1932-1933; Director, Payne Whitney Nursery 
School, New York Hospital, 1933-. 

S. Margaret Gillam, MA 

Director, Department of Nutrition 

Teacher's Diploma, Home Economics, Mechanics Institute, Rochester, 
New York, 1916; B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1922; 
M.A., ibid., 1923; Dietitian, Rochester General Hospital, 1918-1919; 
Superintendent, Woman's Industrial Home, Medical Lake, Washington, 

[27] 



19 1 9-1 92 1 ; Director, Dietetics and Housekeeping, University of Michigan 
Hospital, 1923-1932; Instructor, Institutional Management, Teachers 
College, Columbia University, Summers 1924- 1930; Instructor, Nutrition, 
Department of Public Health and Hygiene, University of Michigan, 
1925-1932; Instructor in Nutrition, Extension Division, ibid., 1930; Di- 
rector, Department of Nutrition, New York Hospital, 1932-. 

Verda F. Hickcox, B.S., R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing; 
Head of Obstetrical and Gynecological 
Nursing Instruction and Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School for Nurses, Chicago, 
191 6; Certificate of Public Health, Chicago School of Civics and Philan- 
thropy, 1919; B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1927; 
C. M. B., General Lying-in Hospital and School of Midwifery, London, 
England, 1928; Chief Nurse, Longfellow Mining and Accident Hospital, 
Morenci, Arizona, 191 6- 191 8; General Staff Nurse, U. S. Army Base 
Hospital No. 13, France, 191 8-19 19; Psychiatric Social Worker, Psychi- 
atric Hospital, Dunning, Illinois, 1920; Community Nurse, American 
Red Cross, Morenci, Arizona, 19201922; Private Duty, 1922-1924; 
General Staff Nurse, University of Wisconsin Hospital, 1924-1925; Pri- 
vate Duty, 1 925- 1 926; Supervisor, Visiting Nurse Association, York, 
Pennsylvania, 1927-1928; Instructor and Assistant to Director, Brooklyn 
Maternity Center Association, 1928; Instructor of Midwifery and Super- 
visor of Obstetrical and Gynecological Departments, Siriraj Hospital, 
Bangkok, Siam, 1 929-1 931; Consultant Nurse, Maternity, Infancy and 
Child Hygiene, New York State Department of Health, 1931-1932; As- 
sistant Director, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932- ; Head of 
Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing Instruction and Service, New York 
Hospital, 1 932-. 

Hannah L. Josephi, R.N. 

Director, Social Service 

Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1901 ; Part- 
time Student, New York School of Philanthropy, 1913; Part-time Student, 
New School for Social Research, 1931; Supervisor, Private Patient Floor, 
New York Hospital, 1901-1902; Superintendent, House of Holy Com- 
forter, New York, 1902- 1905; Superintendent of Hospital and Director, 
Nursing Service, Mountainside Hospital, 1907-1909; Director, Social 
Service, New York Hospital, 1912-. 

Mary T. McDermott, M.A. 

Director, Nurses' Residence ; 
Instructor, Physical Education 

Diploma, Bouve Boston School of Physical Education, 19 16; Special 
Courses, Harvard University, 1917, 1919, 1931 ; People's College, Den- 

[28] 



mark, 1926; B.S. New York University, 1930; M.A. ibid., 1932; Super- 
visor, Physical Education, Third Supervisory District, Greene County, 
N. Y., 1915-1918 ; Supervisor, Physical Education, City Schools, Fitch- 
burg, Massachusetts, 191 8- 19 19; Supervisor of Playground, Concord, 
Massachusetts, 1919; Supervisor, Physical Education, City Schools, Revere, 
Massachusetts, 1919-1921 ; Supervisor of Playground, Brookline, Massa- 
chusetts, 1 92 1 ; Director, Recreation and Physical Education, Stockbridge, 
Massachusetts, 1921-1922; Director, Recreation, City of New Haven, 
1922-1924; Director, Physical Education and Health, State Teachers 
College, Fitchburg, Massachusetts, 1924-1929; Director, Physical Edu- 
cation, Dalton Experimental School, New York, 1 930- 1 931 ; Assistant 
Director Student Activities, New York University, 1931-1932; Instructor, 
Physical Education, ibid., Summer, 1932; Instructor, Physical Education, 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932- ; Director, Nurses' Resi- 
dence, ibid., 1932-. 

Alice Maud Moffatt, R.N. 

Head of Private Patients' Nursing Service 

Bishop Bethune College, Oshawa, Canada, 1904- 1906; Diploma in Nurs- 
ing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1912; Private Duty, 1912- 
1915; General Staff Nurse, Hopital Militaire V. R. 76, France, 1915- 
191 6; Supervisor, Private Patients' Building, New York Hospital, 191 7- 
1932; Head of Private Patients Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 
I932-. 

Sarah E. Moore, R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing; 
Administrative Assistant, Day Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 191 3; Part- 
time Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, and New York 
University, 1914, 1926, 1927, 1928; Teacher, Public Schools, 1 903-1908; 
Head Nurse, New York Hospital, 1913-1918; Instructor, Practical Nurs- 
ing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1918-1922; Assistant Di- 
rectress of Nurses, ibid., 1923-1932; Acting Directress of Nurses, ibid., 
1932; Administrative Assistant, Day Nursing Service, New York Hos- 
pital, 1932-. 

Bessie A. R. Parker, R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing, 
Head of Medical and Surgical Nursing 
Instruction and Services. 

Graduate Provincial Normal School, Fredericton, N. B., Canada, 1905; 
Diploma in Nursing, Rhode Island Hospital Training School for Nurses, 
Providence, 191 8; Part-time Student, Teachers College, Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1932-1935; Full-time Student, ibid., 1936; Teacher, Public 

[29] 



Schools, 1905-1915; Assistant Superintendent of Nurses and Instructor, 
Nursing Practice, Rhode Island Hospital Training School for Nurses, 
19 1 8- 1920; Assistant Superintendent of Nurses and Instructor, Nursing 
Practice, Bridgeport General Hospital School of Nursing, 19201921 ; 
Assistant Superintendent of Nurses and Instructor, Nursing Practice, 
Methodist Episcopal Hospital School of Nursing, Brooklyn, 1921-1926; 
Superintendent of Nurses, ibid., 1926- 1932; Administrative Assistant, 
Evening Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1932-1935; Assistant 
Director, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1936- ; Head of Medi- 
cal and Surgical Nursing Instruction and Services, New York Hospital, 
1936-. 

Agnes Schubert, M.S., R. N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing; 
Head of Pediatric Nursing Instruction 
and Service 

B.S. Northwestern University, 1917; Diploma in Nursing, Western 
Reserve University School of Nursing, 1926; M.S. Teachers College, 
Columbia University, 1932; Supervisor, Babies' and Children's Hospital, 
Western Reserve University, 1926-1927; Assistant Instructor and Super- 
visor, ibid., 1927-1928; Assistant Director, ibid., 1928-1930; Supervisor 
and Instructor, Bobs Roberts Hospital, The University of Chicago Clinics, 
1930-1931; Assistant Director, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 
1932- ; Head of Pediatric Nursing Instruction and Service, New York 
Hospital, 1932-. 

Carolyne A. Sprogell, B.S., R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing; 
Director, Psychiatric Nursing 

Diploma in Nursing, St. Lukes Hospital School of Nursing, New York, 
1924; Post-graduate Course, Psychiatry, Bloomingdale Hospital, 1930; 
B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1936; Head Nurse, South- 
ampton Hospital, 1924; Night Supervisor, ibid., 1925; Private Duty, 
1926; Assistant Superintendent and Instructor, Practical Nursing, South- 
ampton Hospital, 1927-1928; Supervisor, St. Lukes Hospital, New York, 
1929; Assistant Director of Nurses, Bloomingdale Hospital, 1930-1931; 
Acting Director of Nurses, ibid., 1931-1932; Assistant Director, New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932- ; Director, Psychiatric Nursing, 
Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic, New York Hospital, 1932-. 



[30 



INSTRUCTORS AND SUPERVISORS* 

Elizabeth Bell, R.N. 

Instructor and Evening Supervisor, 
Medical and Surgical Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, D. Ogden Mills Training School, Trudeau, New 
York, 1929; Night Supervisor, Trudeau Sanatorium, 1929-1930; Relief 
Assistant, Training School Office, ibid., 1 930-1 931 ; Head Nurse, ibid., 
I93 I_I 935; Instructor, Medical and Surgical Nursing, New York Hos- 
pital School of Nursing, 1936- ; Evening Supervisor, Medical and Sur- 
gical Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1936-. 



Gertrude Victoria Boquist, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Pediatric 
Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Lutheran Hospital School of Nursing, Moline, 
Illinois, 1926; Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1928- 
1929 and 1931-1932; General Staff Nurse, Obstetrical Service, Research 
and Educational Hospital, Chicago, 1927; General Staff Nurse, Albert 
Merritt Billings Hospital, The University of Chicago Clinics, 1927-1928; 
Head Nurse, Pediatric Service, Bellevue Hospital, Summer and Fall, 
1929; Supervisor, Children's Memorial Hospital, Chicago, 1929-193 1 ; In- 
structor, Pediatric Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; 
Supervisor, Pediatric Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1932-. 



Henrietta P. Bouton, B.A., R.N. 

Instructor, Medical Social 
Service Principles and Practice 

B.A. Wellesley College, 1906; Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1921 ; Student, Columbia University Extension Courses, 
1924, 1 931; Instructor, Medical Social Service Principles and Practice, 
New York Hospital Social Service Department, 1933-. 

Barbara Correll, B.S. 

Dietitian, Children's Clinic 

B.S. Eureka College, Eureka, Illinois, 1928; Graduate of Dietetics, St. 
Luke's Hospital, New York, 1929; Dietitian, Madison Hospital, New 
York City, 1930, 1932; Dietitian, Surgical Service, New York Hospital, 
1932-1935; Dietitian, Children's Clinic and Milk Formula Room, ibid., 
I935-. 



* Arranged alphabetically. 

[31] 



Eleanor M. Corrigan, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, 
Psychiatric Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, St. Luke's Hospital School of Nursing, New York, 
1927; Post-graduate Course in Psychiatry, Bloomingdale Hospital, 1932; 
Part-time Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1933-1936; 
Operating Room Supervisor, St. Luke's Hospital, New York, 1929-1932; 
Head Nurse, Payne Whitney Clinic, New York Hospital, 1932-1935 ; 
Instructor, Psychiatric Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 
I 935 - ,' Supervisor, Payne Whitney Clinic, New York Hospital, 1935-. 

Margaret E. Crabtree, B.S. 

Dietitian, Woman's Clinic 

B.S. University of Washington, 1932; Dietetic Certificate, King County 
Hospital, Seattle, 1932; Graduate Study, New York Hospital and Co- 
lumbia University, 1935; Dietitian, Northern State Hospital, Sedro 
Wolley, Washington, 1933-1935; Dietitian, Woman's Clinic, New York 
Hospital, 1935-. 

Helen M. Daum, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor and Assistant Supervisor, 
Medical Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 191 8; B.S. 
Teachers College, Columbia University, 1932; Private Duty Nursing, 
1 91 8- 1 929; School Nursing, Ottawa, Illinois, 1929- 1930; Head Nurse, 
Medical Pavilion, New York Hospital, 1932-1934; Instructor, Medical 
Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1934- ; Assistant Medical 
Supervisor, New York Hospital, 1934-1935; Supervisor, Medical Nursing 
Service, ibid., 1935-. 

Hazel Emmett, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor 
Private Patient Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1920; Super- 
visor, Urological Service, New York Hospital, 1921 ; Supervisor, Ad- 
mitting and Emergency Ward, ibid., 1 921-1923; Supervisor, Operating 
Rooms, ibid., 1924-1927; Private Duty, 1927-1928; Supervisor, Operating 
Rooms, Fifth Avenue Hospital, 1928-1936; Instructor, Private Patient 
Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1936- ; Supervisor, Pri- 
vate Patient Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1936-. 

Laura Wood Fitzsimmons, R.N. 

Instructor and Night Supervisor, 
Psychiatric Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, The Army School of Nursing, 1926; Part-time 
Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1933-1936; Head Nurse, 
Walter Reed Hospital, 1926- 1929; Supervisor, Psychiatric Department, 

[32] 



Gallinger Hospital, 1928-1933; Instructor, Psychiatric Nursing, New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, 1933- ; Assistant Night Supervisor, 
Payne Whitney Clinic, New York Hospital, 1933; Night Supervisor, ibid., 
I934-. 

Mary D. Fremd, R.N. 

Instructor, Operative Technique and Practice; 
Assistant Supervisor, General Operating Room 

Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1930; Night 
Supervisor, Public Operating Room, New York Hospital, 19301931 ; 
Suture Nurse, Public and Private Operating Rooms, ibid., 193 1-1935 ; In- 
structor, Operative Technique and Practice, New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, 1935- ; Assistant Supervisor, General Operating Room, New 
York Hospital, 1935-. 

Elix Friberg, R.N. 

Instructor and Assistant Night Supervisor, 
Psychiatric Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Long Island College Hospital, 1932; Post-Graduate 
Course in Psychiatry, Bloomingdale Hospital, 1932-1933; Part-time Stu- 
dent, Teacher's College, Columbia University and Hunter College, 1934- 
J 935; General Staff Nurse, Payne Whitney Clinic, 1933-1934; Assistant 
Head Nurse, ibid., 1934-1935; Instructor, Psychiatric Nursing, New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, 1935- ; Assistant Night Supervisor, 
Payne Whitney Clinic, New York Hospital, 193 5-. 

Elizabeth E. Geiger, R.N. 

Instructor New Born Care and Supervisor of 
Nurseries, Obstetrical Nursing Service. 

Student, Illinois Woman's College, 1919-1921 ; Diploma in Nursing, Wes- 
ley Memorial Hospital School of Nursing, 1924; Part-time Student, 
University of Chicago, 1934-1936; Supervisor, Pediatric Department, 
Wesley Memorial Hospital, 1925-1927; Supervisor, Out Patient Depart- 
ment, Northwestern University Medical School, 1927-1933; Head Nurse, 
Pediatric Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1933; Supervisor, ibid., 
1933-1934; Supervisor, Staff Health Service and Director, Social Activi- 
ties, Children's Memorial Hospital, Chicago, 1934-1936; Instructor, New 
Born Care, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1936-; Supervisor of 
Nurseries, Obstetrical Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1936-. 

Catherine P. Geuss, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, 

Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing Service 

Diploma in Teaching, Northeast Missouri Teachers College, 1924; 
Diploma in Nursing, Michael Reese Hospital School of Nursing, 1928; 

[33] 



Diploma, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Woman's Hospital, New York, 
1929; Student, University of Chicago, 1930; B.S. and Diploma in Super- 
vision, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1932; Teacher, 1919- 
1924; Head Nurse and Instructor, Obstetrical Nursing, Michael Reese 
Hospital, 1929-1930; Supervisor, Surgical Wards, ibid., 1930-1931; 
Instructor, Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing, New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1932- ; Assistant Supervisor, Obstetrical and Gyneco- 
logical Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1932-1935; Supervisor, ibid., 
I935-. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Knox Gibson, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor and Assistant Director, 
Psychiatric Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Bloomingdale Hospital School of Nursing, 1925; 
B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1928; Supervisor, Blooming- 
dale Hospital, 1925-1926 and 1927-1928; Charge of Private Sanitarium, 
Syracuse, 1 929-1 930; Instructor and Assistant Director of Nurses, Shep- 
pard and Enoch Pratt Hospital School of Nursing, 1930-1932; Instructor, 
Psychiatric Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1933- ; As- 
sistant Director, Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic, New York Hospital, 
I933-. 

Helen W. Gould, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor, Public Health Nursing 

Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1918; B.S. 
Teachers College, Columbia University, 1930; Overseas Service, Army 
and Red Cross in France and Italy, 191 8-19 19; Red Cross Public Health 
Nurse, 1919-1920; School Nursing, Norwood, Massachusetts, 192 1- 1926; 
Staff Nurse and Assistant Supervisor, East Harlem Nursing and Health 
Service, 1926-1929; Red Cross Nursing Field Representative, 1930-1933; 
Assistant to National Director, Public Health Nursing, American Red 
Cross, 1933-1934; Instructor, Public Health Nursing, New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1934-. 

Margaret F. Grainger, B.A., R.N. 

Instructor and Surgical Supervisor, 
Surgical and Urological Nursing Service 

B.A. Butler University, 1927; Diploma in Nursing, Johns Hopkins 
Hospital School for Nurses, 1930; Head Nurse, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 
1930-193 1 ; Assistant Director, Practical Nursing, Johns Hopkins Hos- 
pital School for Nurses, 1931-1934; Assistant Superintendent of Nurses, 
Johns Hopkins Hospital, 1934-1935; Instructor, Surgical and Urological 
Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, I935S Supervisor, Sur- 
gical and Urological Nursing Service, New York Hospital, I935 - - 

[34] 



Thirza L. Hills, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor 
Surgical Nursing Service 

University of Illinois, 1916-1918; Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hos- 
pital School for Nurses, Chicago, 1925; Student, University of Chicago, 
Summer, 1927; Course in Public Health Nursing, Henry Street Settle- 
ment, two months, 1936; Starr nurse, Presbyterian Hospital, Chicago, 
1925-1926; Assistant Night Supervisor, ibid., 1926-1927; Instructor, 
Surgical Procedures, ibid., 1928-1929; Head Nurse, ibid., 1929-1932; 
Head Nurse, Obstetrical Service and Surgical Service, New York Hos- 
pital, 1932-1935; Instructor, Surgical Nursing, New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1935- ; Supervisor, Surgical Nursing Service, New 
York Hospital, 1935-. 

Margaret Joinville, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, 
Psychiatric Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, The Army School of Nursing, 1929; Part-time Stu- 
dent, Hunter College and Teacher's College, Columbia University, 1933- 
1936; Private Duty, 1929-1931; Assistant Head Nurse, Bloomingdale 
Hospital, 1931-1932; Head Nurse, Payne Whitney Clinic, 1932-1936; 
Instructor, Psychiatric Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 
1936- ; Supervisor, Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic, New York Hos- 
pital, 1936-. 

Cora E. Kay, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor and Evening Supervisor, Medical 
and Surgical Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, St. Luke's Hospital School of Nursing, Chicago, 
1921 ; B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1936; Instructor, 
Nursing Principles and Practice and Supervisor of Wards, Allegheny 
General Hospital, Pittsburgh, 1921-1923; Assistant Superintendent of 
Nurses, St. Luke's Hospital School of Nursing, St. Louis, 1923-1926; 
Instructor, Nursing Principles and Practice, St. Luke's Hospital School of 
Nursing, Chicago, 1926-1927; Principal, School of Nursing and Director, 
Nursing Service, Chicago Memorial Hospital, 1927-1928; Instructor, 
Nursing Principles and Practice and Second Assistant to Superintendent 
of Nurses, Clifton Springs Sanitarium and Clinic, 1929-1932; Instructor, 
Medical and Surgical Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 
1932- ; Evening Supervisor, Medical and Surgical Nursing Service, New 
York Hospital, 1932-. 

Caroline Keller, B.A., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Surgical 
Nursing Service 

B.A. Smith College, 1921 ; Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital 
School of Nursing, New York, 1929; Instructor, Miss Day's School, 

[35] 



New Haven, 1921-1924; Instructor, The Holman School, Philadelphia, 
1924-1925; Head Nurse, Surgical Ward, New Haven Hospital, 1929- 
1930; Assistant Supervisor, Surgical Nursing, New Haven Hospital, 
1930-1932; Instructor, Surgical Nursing, New York Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1932- ; Supervisor, Surgical Nursing Service, New York Hos- 
pital, 1932-. 

Mary Elizabeth Klein, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Obstetrical 
and Gynecological Nursing Service 
Diploma in Nursing, Hahnemann Hospital School of Nursing, 191 6; 
B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1936; Supervisor, Private 
Hospital, Guayaquil, Ecuador, 1917-1918; Private Duty, 1918-1921 ; 
Supervisor, Private Floors, Hahnemann Hospital, 1921-1925; Supervisor, 
Operating Rooms, ibid., 1925-1928; Head Nurse, Maternity Hospital, 
Western Reserve University, 1929-1930; Supervisor and Assistant In- 
structor, ibid., 1 930- 1 932; Instructor, Obstetrical and Gynecological Nurs- 
ing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; Supervisor, Obstetrical 
and Gynecological Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1932-. 

Eleanor Lewis, B.A., B.N., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Psychiatric 
Out-Patient Nursing Service 

B.A. Radcliffe College, 1925; B.N. Yale University School of Nursing, 
1928; Nurse in Charge, Urological Clinic, New Haven Hospital, 1928- 
1929; Psychiatric Nursing, Four Winds Sanatorium, Katonah, New York, 
1929-1932; Assistant Head Nurse, Children's Service, Payne Whitney 
Clinic, New York Hospital, 1932-1933; Staff Nurse, ibid., 1933-1934; 
Staff Nurse, Brooklyn Visiting Nurse Association, 1934-1935; Instructor, 
Psychiatric Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1935- ; 
Supervisor, Psychiatric Out-Patient Nursing Service, Payne Whitney 
Clinic, New York Hospital, 1935-. 

Lucy J. Macdonald, R.N. 

Supervisor, Private Operating Room 

Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1927 ; Part- 
time Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1927; Head Nurse, 
Surgical Ward, New York Hospital, 1927; Suture Nurse, Public Oper- 
ating Room, ibid., 1 928-1 931; Supervisor, Private Operating Room, ibid., 
1932; Head Nurse, Emergency Pavilion, New York Hospital, 1932-1933; 
Supervisor, Private Operating Room, ibid., 1934-. 

Grace Conway Nason, R.N. 

Instructor and Night Supervisor, 
Pediatric Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Lynn Hospital School of Nursing, 1927; Diploma 
in Psychiatric Nursing, McLean Hospital School of Nursing, 1927; Post- 

[36] 



Graduate Course, Pediatrics, Babies' Hospital, Western Reserve Uni- 
versity, 1928; Part-time Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, 
1932-1933; Hunter College, I933-I934I Night Supervisor, Marblehead 
Hospital, 1927-1928; Supervisor and Instructor, Pediatric Nursing Service, 
Metropolitan Hospital, 1929-1932; Instructor, Pediatric Nursing, New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932- ; Night Supervisor, Pediatric 
Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1932-. 

Jeannette Peterson, R.N. 

Instructor and Night Supervisor, 

Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Augustana Hospital Training School for Nurses, 
1929; Student, Colorado State Teachers College, Summer, 1933; Student, 
Hunter College, Fall of 1934; Night Supervisor, Labor and Delivery 
Rooms, Augustana Hospital, 1929; Supervisor, Obstetrical Department, 
Immanuel Hospital, Omaha, 1929-1931; Supervisor, Obstetrical Depart- 
ment, Greeley Hospital, Greeley, Colorado, 1932; General Staff Nurse, 
U. S. Veterans' and Women's and Children's Hospital, Albuquerque, New 
Mexico, 1933; General Staff Nurse, U. S. Veterans' Administration 
Hospital, Fort Lyon, Colorado Springs, 1934; General Staff Nurse, Ob- 
stetrical and Gynecological Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1934; 
Instructor, Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing, New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1934- ; Supervisor, Obstetrical and Gynecological 
Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1934-. 

Flora Pieper, M.A. 

Dietitian, Nutrition Clinic 

Diploma, The Stout Institute, 1924; Ph.B., The University of Chicago, 
1930; M.A. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1932; Diploma, Food 
Clinic, Pennsylvania Hospital, Philadelphia, 1932; Dietitian, Lutheran 
Hospital, La Crosse, Wisconsin, 1924-1926; Dietitian, Springfield Hospi- 
tal, Springfield, Illinois, 1926-1928; Nutritionist, American Red Cross, 
St. Joseph, Missouri, 1930-1931; Dietitian, Nutrition Clinic, New York 
Hospital, I933-. 

Mrs. Muriel Weeks Ray, R.N. 

Instructor, Operative Technique and Practice; 
Supervisor, General Operating Rooms 

Diploma in Nursing, Peter Bent Brigham Hospital School of Nursing, 
1928; Head Nurse, Private Ward; Assistant Supervisor, Operating 
Rooms; Teaching Supervisor, Operating Rooms, Peter Bent Brigham 
Hospital, 1929-1931; Private Duty, 1931; Supervisor, Eye Operating 
Room, Massachusetts Eye & Ear Infirmary, 1931-1932; Head Nurse, 
Surgical Supply Room, New York Hospital, 1932-1933; Instructor, 
Operative Technique and Practice, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 

[37] 



I933 - j Assistant Supervisor, General Operating Rooms, New York Hos- 
pital, 1933-1935; Supervisor, ibid., I935-- 

Henderika J. Rynbergen, B.S. 

Instructor, Nutrition 

B.S. Simmons College, 1922; Nutrition Worker Neighborhood Kitchen, 
Boston, 1 922- 1 924; Food Clinic Dietitian, Washington University Dis- 
pensary, Barnes and Allied Hospitals, St. Louis, 1924-1926; Head Dieti- 
tian, Sea View Hospital, New York, 1927; Ward Dietitian, Presbyterian 
Hospital, New York, 1927-1928; Food Clinic Dietitian, Vanderbilt Clinic, 
ibid., 1928-1929; Dietitian, American University Hospital, Beirut, Syria, 
1 929- 1 934; Instructor in Nutrition, New York Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing, 1 934-. 

Helen Schnetzer, R.N. 

Instructor and Evening Supervisor, 
Pediatric Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, St. Vincent's Hospital School of Nursing, 1930; 
Part-time Student, Teacher's College, Columbia University, 19301932, 
1935-1936; Full-time Student, ibid., 1934-1935; Second Assistant and In- 
structor, Pediatric Nursing, New York Nursery and Childs Hospital, 
1 930-1 932; Camp Nurse, summer, 1932; Assistant Head Nurse, Pediatric 
Metabolism Unit, New York Hospital, 1932-1934; Instructor, Pediatric 
Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1935- ; Evening Super- 
visor, Pediatric Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1935-. 

Mabel R. Stimpson, B.S. 

Dietitian, Nutrition Clinic 

B.S. University of Washington, 1929; Dietetic Certificate, Peter Bent 
Brigham Hospital, 1930; Dietitian, Food Clinic, Boston Dispensary, 1930- 
1932; Dietitian, Nutrition Clinic, New York Hospital, 1932-. 

Ethel M. Sykes, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Pediatric 
Nursing Service 

Teaching Certificate, West Riding Education Department, Yorkshire, 
England, 1921 ; Student, Geneseo Normal School, Summer 1925; Diploma 
in Nursing, Geneva General Hospital School of Nursing, 1929; B.S. 
Teachers College, Columbia University, 1936; Assistant Infants', Mistress, 
Westerton Council School, Yorkshire, England, 1 921-1924; School 
Teacher, 1925-1926; Head Nurse, Medical Ward, Pediatric Department, 
Bellevue Hospital, 1929; Assistant Teaching Supervisor, Pediatric De- 
partment, ibid., 1929-1932; Supervisor in Charge, Pediatric Department, 
ibid., 1932-1933; Instructor, Pediatric Nursing Service, New York Hos- 

[38] 



pital School of Nursing, 1933- ; Supervisor, Pediatric Service, New York 
Hospital, I933-- 

Jeanette Walters, R.N. 

Instructor and Evening Supervisor, Obstetrical 
and Gynecological Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Temple University Hospital School of Nursing, 
1923; Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, Summer 1924, 
Part-time Student, ibid., 1933, 1934, 1935; Post-Graduate Course, Ob- 
stetrics, Woman's Hospital, New York, 1932; Supervisor, Medical and 
Surgical Ward, Temple University Hospital, 1924- 1925; Supervisor, 
Babies' Hospital, Philadelphia, 1926-1928; Assistant Superintendent, Co- 
lumbia Hospital, 1928-1929; Supervisor, Obstetrical Department, Temple 
University Hospital, 1930; Instructor, Obstetrical and Gynecological 
Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932- ; Evening Super- 
visor, Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing Service New York Hospital, 
I932-. 

Florence K. Wilson, M.A., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Medical 
Nursing Service 

B.A. University of Michigan, 19 13; Vassar Training Camp for Nurses, 
Summer 191 8; Diploma in Nursing, City Hospital School of Nursing, 
New York, 1920; Study of Cost of Nursing Education under Direction 
of May Ayres Burgess, Western Reserve University School of Nursing, 
1930; Study of Duties of Supervisors, Western Reserve University School 
of Nursing, 1931 ; M.A. Western Reserve University, 1931 ; Author, 
Ward Study Units in Medical Nursing; Private Duty, New York City, 
192 1 ; Staff Nurse, Henry Street Visiting Nurse Association, 1922; In- 
structor and Supervisor in Medical Nursing, The Lakeside Hospital and 
Western Reserve University School of Nursing, 1923- 1929; Supervisor, 
University of Nebraska Hospital, 1932-1934; Instructor, Medical Nursing, 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1934-. Supervisor, Medical Nurs- 
ing Service, New York Hospital, 1934-. 

Margaret Wyatt, B.A., R.N. 

Instructor, Nursing Principles and Practice 

B.A. Meredith College, 1923; Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1927; Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, 
Summers I93I-I935; Instructor and Assistant to the Dean of Women, 
Meredith College, 1923-1924; Head Nurse, Surgical Ward, New York 
Hospital, 1927-1930; Instructor, Nursing Principles and Practice, New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, 1930-. 



[39] 



HEAD NURSES AND CHARGE NURSES 
ASSISTANT INSTRUCTORS 



Medical and 

Ida T. Addy, R.N. 
Marjorie Arehart, R.N. 
Margaret A. Bissell, R.N. 
Mrs. Margit J. Brandt, R.N. 
Elizabeth L. Brodie, R.N. 
Winifred G. Cantwell, R.N. 
Virginia G. Daniels, R.N. 
Barbara Derr, R.N. 

Katherin 



Surgical Services 

Mrs. Helen F. Dunning, R.N. 
Eleanor M. Greenway, R.N. 
Elizabeth H.Harmon, B.A., R.N. 
Helena H. Hurn, R.N. 
Ethel L. MacKay, R.N. 
Frances A. Morrison, R.N. 
Mrs. Ruby M. Peterson, R.N. 
Helen E. Schumann, R.N. 
e Zorn, R.N. 



Out-Patient Service 



Mrs. Anne Beard, R.N. 
Evelyn S. Clark, R.N. 
Alcida H. Coulter, R.N. 
Irene Curley, R.N. 
Mrs.Katherine Drucklieb,R.N. 
Elsie M. Fiege, R.N. 
Martha Johnson, R.N. 



Lucile M. Lambert, R.N. 
Evelyn Liddle, R.N. 
Pauline M. Murphy, R.N. 
Mrs. Elsa Nussbaumer, R.N. 
Mrs. Celia Pehr, R.N. 
Margaret Rouchleau, R.N. 
Rebecca Talbott, R.N. 



Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic 



Willis Aldrich, R.N. 
Marjorie Drew, R.N. 
Cornelia Echardt, R.N. 
Vera Fraser, R.N. 
Martin Grothe, R.N. 
Florence Harvey, R.N. 



Beatrice Healy, R.N. 
Margaret Kelleher, 
Mary Kutz, R.N. 
John Moffatt, R.N. 
Zula Shorey, R.N. 
Arlene Wilson, R.N. 



R.N. 



Pediatric Service 

Alice E. Claflin, R.N. Norween K. Fisher, R.N. 

Sarah M. Ferguson, R.N. Margaret Kelly, R.N. 

Mildred M. Stone, R.N. 



Private and Semi-Private Patient Service 



Alice E. Burlin, R.N. 
Mildred L. Harrington, R.N. 
Dorothy Hobart, B.S., R.N. 
Margaret M. Landes, R.N. 



Philomene M. Marshall, R.N. 
Myrna E. Weight, R.N. 
Ada D. Wyman, R.N. 
Helen Yesulaitus, R.N. 

[40] 



Woman's Clinic 



Dorothy E. Allison, R.N. 
Helen Callon, R.N. 
Gertrude Evans, R.N. 
Dorothy S. Fisher, R.N. 
Edith Gaeckle, R.N. 
Beulah M. Hartman, R.N. 



Anna Elizabeth Hill, R.N. 
Eda Hoewtscher, R.N. 
Mildred A. Jensen, R.N. 
Veronica E. Matus, R.N. 
Mrs. Alice F. Pastore, R.N. 
Elizabeth B. Woods, B.A., R.N. 



Phyllis Anderson 



Alsistant Director, Nurses Residence 
Assistant Instructor, Physical Education 



assistant head nurses 
day and night services 



Medical and Surgical Services 



Margaret M. Baxter, R.N. 
Mrs. Ruth A. Brockman, R.N. 
Vivian Lois Brophy, R.N. 
Fern E. Christensen, R.N. 
Mrs. Margaret R. Clark, R.N. 
Helen C. Conway, R.N. 
Mrs. Edna L. Eckel, R.N. 
Antoinette T. Fedorowicz, R.N. 
H. Estelle Follis, R.N. 
Alberta E. Frampton, R.N. 
Edith P. Friedrichs, R.N. 
Loretta Joan Gallagher, R.N. 
Dorothy R. Gaunt, R.N. 



Mrs. Frances D. Greco, R.N. 
Julia A. Hawks, R.N. 
Pauline Humiston, B.A., R.N. 
Josephine K. Hummel, R.N. 
Pauline Mary Laracy, R.N. 
Ruth C. McLellan, R.N. 
Dorothy E. Meyer, R.N. 
Olga Ostborg, R.N. 
Ruth Honor Roberts, R.N. 
Emily Rogers, B.A., R.N. 
Charlotte E. Sowers, R.N. 
Sylvia C Stearin, R.N. 
Eva Viola Steinburg, R.N. 



Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic 

Mrs. Helen Frank, R.N. Lenora MacKay, R.N. 

Paul Hanlon, R.N. James MacLeod, R.N. 

Mrs. E. Hollander, R.N. Mrs. Nancy Sanborn, R.N. 

Orpha Wood, R.N. 



Marjorie C. Allen, R.N. 
Helen E. Enright, R.N. 
Mildred Maw, B.A., R.N. 



Pediatric Service 

Della Meachard, R.N. 
Audrey Merle Wiley, R.N. 
Ruth E. Woodfall, R.N. 

[41] 



Private and Semi-Private Services 



Jean E. Blampied, R.N. 
Laura M. Burlin, R.N. 
Margaret Dorsey, R.N. 
Florence Ruth Hassler, R.N. 
Frances R. McGrath, R.N. 
Veronica Morris, R.N. 



Julia Pendarvis, R.N. 
Louise A. Rase, R.N. 
Mrs. Virginia S. Sweeney, R.N, 
Lois Mary Tait, R.N. 
Bernice Thompson, R.N. 
Ivy Doris Watkins, R.N. 



Frances Lavina Wilson, R.N. 



Woman's* Clinic 



Gertrude M. C. Anderson, R.N. 
Mrs. Florence Campbell, R.N. 
Martha R. Dyer, R.N. 
Henrietta Eppink, R.N. 
Catherine Fehr, R.N. 
Mary Eleanor Friedrichs, R.N, 
Marion Giddings, R.N. 
Helen M. Golden, R.N. 
Eunice E. Greenwood, R.N. 
Virginia G. Henry, R.N. 
Anna L. Hluska, R.N. 



Elizabeth B. Lawrence, R.N, 
Margaret Leaver, R.N. 
Blanche V. B. Lee, R.N. 
Irene Lester, R.N. 
Mary C. Littler, R.N. 
Clara A. Mead, R.N. 
Ferne M. Parent, R.N. 
Mildred M. Scheffler, 
Ruth M. Wilson, R.N. 
Janette S. Wood, R.N. 
Loretta Ellen Wright, 



R.N. 



R.N. 



STUDENT AND STAFF HEALTH 

Marion Tyndall, M.D Physician-in-Charge 

Phyllis Greenacre, M.D Consultant Psychiatrist 

Elsie Davtes, R.N Supervisor, Infirmary 



ASSISTANTS IN ADMINISTRATION 



Flora Josephine Bergstrom, R.N. 
Ella Bullen, B.A. 
Mrs. Rose Larner 
Dorothy Jacobus, B.A. 



Librarian 

Secretary 

Secretary 

Secretary-Registrar 



[42] 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY MEDICAL COLLEGE 

FACULTY AND OTHERS PARTICIPATING IN 

INSTRUCTION* 

Philip B. Armstrong, M.D. Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

Gertrude Gottschall, Ph.D. Assistant in Bio-Chemistry 

Ralph G. Stillman, M.D. Assistant Professor of Clinical Pathology 
Ruth Thomas, A.B., C.P.H. Instructor, Applied Bacteriology 

George W. Wheeler, M.D. Assistant Professor of Bacteriology 



Eugene F. DuBois, M.D., and Staff Professor of Medicine 

Oskar Diethelm, M.D., and Staff Professor of Psychiatry 

George S. Heuer, M.D., and staff Professor of Surgery 

Samuel Z. Levine, M.D., and Staff Professor of Pediatrics 

Henricus J. Stander, M.D., and Staff 

Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology 



Camille Gaute Instructor of Massage 

R. C. Redden, M.D. Director, First Aid, American Red Cross 

Mary T. Whitley, PhD. 

Professor of Psychology, Teachers College, Columbia University 



MEMBERS OF AFFILIATING ORGANIZATIONS 

Hazel Corbin, R.N. Maternity Center Association 

General Director 

Marguerite A. Wales, M.A., R.N. Visiting Nurse Service, 

General Director of Nursing Henry Street Settlement 

• Arranged alphabetically. 



[43] 



THE SOCIETY OF THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 



THE 

NEW YORK HOSPITAL 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 



ANNOUNCEMENT 
1937. 1938 



VOLUME VI NUMBER I 



If after reading this bulletin there are 

further questions, please write to the Director 

of the School of Nursing. An application will 

be sent upon request if an applicant is able 

to satisfy the entrance requirements. 




NEW YORK HOSPITAL, SOUTH VIEW 



TI 



THE SOCIETY OF THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 

THE 

NEW YORK HOSPITAL 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Associated with Cornell University 




Announcement 

l 937 • J 93 8 



Volume vi 



X I'M HER I 



CALENDAR 



1937 

September 25 .... Matriculation and Registration (First 

year students) 

September 27 .... Winter Term begins — Classes convene 

October 12 Columbus Day (Not observed by first 

year students) 

November 25-28 . . . Thanksgiving Recess (First year stu- 
dents) 

November 25 .... Thanksgiving Day — A holiday 

December 24) ... . Christmas Vacation (First year stu- 

January 2 / dents) 

December 25 Christmas Day — A holiday 

1938 

January 1 New Year's Day — A holiday 

January 3 Classes convene 

January 16 Winter Term ends 

January 17 Spring Term begins — Classes convene 

February 12 Lincoln's Birthday — A holiday 

February 22 Washington's Birthday — A holiday 

May 8 Spring Term ends 

May 9 Summer Term begins — Classes convene 

May 30 Memorial Day — A holiday 

July 4 Independence Day — A holiday 

September 5 Labor Day — A holiday 

October 1 Matriculation and Registration (First 

year students) 
October 2 Summer Term ends 

(Four weeks' vacation and three weeks' vacation 
within the summer term for second and first year 
students respectively ; two weeks' vacation for 
third year students during psychiatric assignment.) 

October 3 Winter Term begins — Classes convene 

No classes will be held on the above noted holidays. 



[ 5 ] 




LOBBY OF NURSES RESIDENCE 



GENERAL STATEMENT 



History 



THE New York Hospital, the second oldest hospital in 
America, maintained by private endowment, received its 
charter of incorporation under George the Third of England on 
the thirteenth day of June, 1 77 1 , under the title of the Society 
of the Hospital in the City of New York in America. Subse- 
quently by an Act of the Legislature in 18 10 the title was 
changed to The Society of The New York Hospital. 

The first systematic training for nurses, through lectures and 
practical instruction on the wards, was begun in 1799 under the 
direction and tutelage of Dr. Valentine Seaman and continued 
throughout his association with the hospital until 18 17. 

The School of Nursing, an integral part of the hospital, cele- 
brates the sixtieth anniversary of its founding this year and 
points with just pride to its fourteen hundred graduates who 
have contributed to community services through administration 
and teaching in schools of nursing and in public health organiza- 
tions as well as in the field of private nursing. 

In June 1927 the New York Hospital formed an association 
with the Cornell University Medical College. The resources of 
each institution were increased and an extensive program of 
building was begun. The new plant situated on York Avenue 
between Sixty-eighth and Seventy-first Streets was opened Sep- 
tember 1932 and offers unusual opportunities and facilities for 
the progressive development of the school of nursing. 

The school of nursing is registered with the Regents of New 
York State which permits its graduates to take the state board 
examinations in order to secure state registration. 

The hospital is approved by the American College of Sur- 
geons, approved for internships by the American Medical Asso- 
ciation and is a member of the American Hospital Association. 



[ 7 ] 



Aims of the School of Nursing 

Nursing offers a challenge to young women with exceptional 
personal and professional qualifications who are interested in 
social welfare. The aim of the school of nursing of the New 
York Hospital is to prepare carefully selected students in the 
fundamental principles of nursing in its various clinical aspects 
as applied to home, hospital and public health services, with 
emphasis upon the responsibility for health teaching. The de- 
velopment of the individual student as a responsible member of 
civic and social life is a significant outcome of the program. 

Facilities for the School 

A special building for the school of nursing is adjacent to the 
hospital buildings. It provides adequate and well equipped class- 
rooms, laboratories, library and recreation rooms as well as 
attractive and comfortable living accommodations for students 
and faculty. 

Further necessary laboratory and library facilities are avail- 
able through association with the Cornell University Medical 
College. 

The clinical facilities of the New York Hospital are unsur- 
passed for the study and care of patients. The hospital, with a 
potential capacity of one thousand beds, admits all types of 
patients including medical, surgical, obstetrical, gynecological, 
pediatric and psychiatric, and the out-patient department pro- 
vides ample opportunity for the study of ambulatory patients. 

Affiliation is made with the Henry Street Visiting Nurse Serv- 
ice for field experience in public health nursing and with the 
Maternity Center Association and the Lobenstine Clinic for 
observation in obstetrical nursing in homes. 

The social service department of the New York Hospital 
participates in the nursing program by the integration of social 
service throughout the course of study. 



[ 8 ] 



Requirements for Admission 

The matriculation requirement is satisfactory graduation from 
an accredited high school or recognized preparatory school in 
which the following units of study have been taken : 

English 4 units 

History I unit 

Civics l /i unit 

Mathematics 2 units 

(Algebra 1 unit; plane geometry 1 unit) 
Science 2 units 

(Chemistry required; physics advised) 
Foreign Language 3 units 

(Three units of one language or two in 

each of two) 
Electives 3^2 units 

Total 16 units 

Emphasis is placed upon scholarship of applicants. Preference 
in admission will be given to those who have had advanced study. 
It is advised that prospective students from college have intro- 
ductory chemistry, zoology or biology, physics and psychology. 
All students should review arithmetic prior to admission. 

Besides these scholastic admission requirements students 
should be at least nineteen and not over thirty years of age and 
must present evidence of physical and personal fitness for nursing. 

Exceptions to these matriculation requirements may be made 
only by offering substitutions satisfactory to the Committee on 
Admissions. 

A personal conference of the student and her parent or guard- 
ian with the director of the school of nursing is desirable and 
should be arranged after formal application has been submitted 
to the school. An appointment for an interview will be made 
upon request. 

All applications for admission should be addressed to the 

[ 9 1 



Director of the School of Nursing, 525 East Sixty-eighth Street, 
New York, New York. 

Requirements for Non-Citizens 

According to the law of New York State every person ad- 
mitted to the examination for license as registered nurse in 
New York State at the termination of her course of study must 
submit evidence that she is a citizen of the United States. The 
New York Hospital School of Nursing therefore requires that 
an applicant fulfill this requirement prior to entrance to the 
school. 

Advanced Standing 

Advanced standing may be granted those students who pre- 
sent credentials showing satisfactory completion of courses of 
study taken in other schools deemed of similar or equal value 
to those given in the New York Hospital School of Nursing. 

An applicant who has received her baccalaureate degree may 
have her time in the school reduced by two or four months if 
she maintains a scholastic standing of an average of "B" grade 
in the first and second years provided this request is presented 
the last term of the second year. 

Accrediting by Cornell University 

To those students who may later wish to matriculate at the 
New York State College of Home Economics, Cornell Uni- 
versity, if they present all other necessary requirements, the 
curriculum of the New York Hospital School of Nursing will 
be credited to the amount of not less than forty-five hours, which 
is equivalent to one and a half academic years of college credit, 
toward the Bachelor of Science degree. 

The Curriculum 

The three-year curriculum of the school of nursing is so 
planned as to give each student a thorough understanding of 

[10] 




STUDENT CARES FOR CONVALESCENT PATIENT IN SOLARIL'M 




THE PLAY TEACHER 



the basic sciences and principles underlying good nursing and 
of the best methods to use in the care of the sick, in the pre- 
vention of disease, and in health education. 

Each of the three school years is divided into terms of six- 
teen weeks each. 

During the first term and a half limited nursing practice is 
given in the pavilions of the hospital and the clinics of the out- 
patient department while a greater amount of time is spent in 
class and laboratory. In the subsequent seven and one-half terms 
the student's nursing practice increases in length of time and 
in responsibility and a sequence is planned to include the various 
types of clinical services during day, evening and night periods 
in order that the student may acquire complete understanding 
of patients' needs. 

During these clinical terms each student is scheduled forty- 
eight hours per week which includes all class and nursing prac- 
tice assignments. 

Requirements of Scholarship and Graduation 

Students will be graded in their studies on a basis of weighted 
quality points with an average of two quality points required 
for promotion and graduation. 

The following grading system has been established: 

A — Excellent 4 quality points 

B — Good 3 quality points 

C — Average 2 quality points 

D — Pass 1 quality point 

F — Failure o quality point 

I — Incomplete . . . Given in cases of absence and 

not because of poor scholarship 

Failure in any given subject may necessitate withdrawal from 
the school unless the student's scholarship is exceptional in other 
respects in which case repetition of the course may be recom- 
mended by the instructor. 

[12] 



Fees 
Matriculation Fee $10.00 

Payable at first registration; not refundable. 

Tuition Fee 75-oo 

Payable at first registration $50.00 

Payable at beginning of second term, first 

year 25.00 

Not refundable after second week for any cause of 

withdrawal. 

Laboratory Fee 15.00 

Payable at first registration; not refundable. 

Chemistry Laboratory Fee 5.00 

Payable at first registration; amount not used for 
breakage to be refunded, or excess breakage to be 
paid. 

Health Service Fee 15.00 

Five dollars payable at first registration and begin- 
ning of first term, second and third years. 

Graduation Fee 15.00 

Payable at beginning of third term, third year. Re- 
fundable if student is not graduated. 

Total Fees for New York Hospital School of 

Nursing $135.00 

Tuition Fee for Henry Street Visiting Nurse 

Service 25.00 

Total School Fees $160.00 

In addition to these fees students pay a Student Activity Fee 
of $5.00 each year which is collected by the class treasurer. 

Maintenance and General Expenses 

The school of nursing provides maintenance and limited gra- 
tuitous care in case of illness and furnishes each student with 

[13] 




THE GREEX DINING ROOM 




STUDY IN THE LIBRARY 



the uniform and cap of the school which remain the property 
of the school until graduation. Note health regulations and 
service page 16. 

The following estimated expenses must be met by the student: 

31-dvr. Optional 





1st yr. 


2nd yr. 


3rd yr. 




ist terra 






Uniform aprons, bibs and 








accessories .... 


$ 2 2.00 




$4.00 


Uniform shoes .... 


8.5O 


8.5O 


8.5O 


Uniform sweater 


4.OO 






Uniform cape . . . . 








Rental of two laboratory 








coats 


1. 00 






Rental of four Henry 








Street uniforms . 






5.00 


Books, keys and miscella- 








neous supplies 


20.00 


5.00 


5.00 


Expenses for district visits 








and excursions 


5.00 


5.OO 


15.00 



$15.00 



5.00 



S60.00 ^18.50 $37.50 $30.00 

None of the aforementioned articles should be purchased be- 
fore admission to the school. Students should be provided with 
an allowance for other personal needs determined by individual 
requirements. A list of limited necessary personal equipment 
will be sent each prospective student when accepted for admis- 
sion. For the three-year course the total cost to the student is 
estimated at three hundred and fifty dollars in addition to per- 
sonal expenditures as determined by the student. 

Registration and Orientation 

First-year students entering in the fall of nineteen hundred 
and thirty-seven must register at the school by noon on Saturday, 
September twenty-fifth; those entering in the fall of nineteen 
hundred and thirty-eight by noon on Saturday, October first. 

[ *5] 



A brief orientation program precedes formal instruction. 
During this time students take required psychological tests and 
an arithmetic pre-test, have necessary physical examinations with 
Schick, Dick and Mantoux tests, confer with faculty advisers 
and secure uniforms, books and other equipment. 

Health Regulations and Service 

The school of nursing maintains a health service for its stu- 
dents. A well equipped infirmary with necessary staff is pro- 
vided in the nurses' residence. A physical examination by the 
school physician with chest x-rays is required upon admission to 
the school and subsequent annual physical examinations will be 
given. 

Vaccinations against typhoid fever and smallpox will be re- 
quested of all students before admission to the school. Schick 
and Dick tests and immunization for positive reactions will be 
required of all students before or after admission to the school. 
Mantoux tests will be given during the pre-clinical period and 
for those who are negative will be repeated at regular intervals. 

Infirmary care for minor illnesses will be limited to four 
weeks at any one time in the case of all students. For more seri- 
ous illnesses students will be cared for gratuitously in the hospital 
for not more than two weeks at any one time for the first-year 
students and not more than four weeks at any one time for 
second and third year students. Expenses for special nursing care 
and special therapies must be borne by the student or her 
family. 

Vacations and Other Absences 

During the first and second years a vacation of four weeks 
is given and during the third year one of two weeks. For first- 
year students one week's vacation is planned at Christmas (see 
calendar) and three weeks during the summer term. For all 
second-year students a vacation of four weeks is planned dur- 
ing the summer term of the year. For third-year students a two 
weeks' vacation is given during any one of the three terms. 

[16] 



This vacation is not given to those students who have an ex- 
emption of time. 

All vacations are arranged by the school of nursing to con- 
form to the requirements of the educational program and the 
fields in which clinical practice is obtained. 

Except for first-year students during their first term, holidays 
are observed only in connection with class schedules. 

As a result of absences the repetition of a course of study 
or special examinations may be required; class registration may 
be changed and in necessary instances nursing practice will have 
to be made up. 

Student Loan Fund 

A student loan fund has been established to give necessary 
financial aid to those who show promise in nursing. These finan- 
cial benefits are not available to first-year students until after 
their first term's work. 

Applications for student loans should be made in writing to 
the Director of the School. 

EXTRA-CURRICULAR OPPORTUNITIES 

Believing that the education of young women today must 
include activities relating to healthful social relationships gen- 
erous provision for this development in the life of the student 
has been made. 

The beautiful fireproof, sixteen-story residence, erected adja- 
cent to the hospital buildings, is the center for these activities. 
Every effort has been made in its construction and equipment to 
provide for the normal and healthy life of students and faculty. 

Each of the eight student residence floors contains attractively 
furnished single bedrooms with lavatories, ample common baths, 
showers and toilet facilities, a common sitting-room with ad- 
joining kitchenette for informal gatherings and a laundryette. 

Comfortable lounges, reading, reception and dining-rooms are 
on the first and ground floors. 

[i7] 



For further recreational activities, a large well equipped gym- 
nasium, billiard-room, game-room and porches are available. 
Arrangements for the use of an outdoor playground and an 
indoor swimming pool are made. 

To insure the full benefit and proper use of these facilities 
well qualified instructors are appointed to direct the social and 
recreational activities of the school. 

School Government 

The school of nursing has a cooperative government in which 
the students take an active part. A student organization has 
been established and works actively with the Faculty Committee 
on Student Affairs in all matters relating to social and profes- 
sional conduct and discipline. 

An annual student activities fee of five dollars is required and 
collected by each class. 



The Neil- York Hospital School of Nursing reserves the privilege of changing its 
curriculum, its educational policies and fees as are deemed advisable for the 
progressive development of the school. 



[.8 




A ROOM OF HER OWN 




SUNDAY MORNING BREAKFAST IN THE FLOOR SITTING ROOM 



THE CURRICULUM 



First Year 



Class and Approximate 
Laboratory Hours Credit 

Hours Practice Hours 



Anatomy 60 

Bacteriology and Pathology .... 66 

Chemistry 60 

Physiology 45 

History of Nursing 30 

Elementary Psychology 30 

Psychology of Deviate Behavior . . 15 

Nursing Principles and Practice . . 140 

Professional Adjustments I . . . . 15 

Nutrition and Cookery 30 

Diet Therapy 30 

Social and Economic Aspects of Health 

and Disease 30 

Materia Medica 30 

Medicine 35 

Communicable Diseases 25 

Medical Nursing 15 

Surgery 45 

Surgical Nursing 15 

(Orientation — 22 hours — no credit, in- 
cludes Personal Hygiene — 8 hours) 

Totals 716 





2 


. . . 


2 


. . . 


2 


. . . 


1/2 




2 


. . . 


2 




I 


315 


6V2 


. . . 


I 


. . . 


1/2 




1/ 


. . . 


2 




2 




4 


480 


5 




3 


480 


5 







1275 



44 



[20] 



Second Year 



Class and Approximate 
Laboratory Hours 



Medical Nursing 
Diet Therapy Practice 
Operative Technique 
Pediatrics .... 



Hours 



15 

30 

Pediatric Nursing 30 

Obstetrics and Gynecology .... 45 

Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing 15 

Development of Behavior in Children 30 



Third Ye 



Medical Nursing 

Diet Therapy Practice 

Surgical Nursing 

Emergency Nursing 

Psychiatry 

Psychiatric Nursing 

Special Therapeutics 

Family and Community Health 

Community Nursing Practice 

Out Patient Nursing Practice 

Private Patient Nursing Practice 

Professional Adjustments II . 



Total; 



Grand Total Hours and Credit 



AR 



Practice 
192 

192 
369 

708 
708 



Totals 165 2169 



Credit 
Hours 

1/2 
1/2 

4 

1K2 
8/2 
3 

7 
2 

29 



8 


280 


2/2 




96 


1 


8 


376 


3/2 


16 




1 


45 




3 


30 


547 


6 




146 


1 


20 




1 




384 


3 




192 


2 




192 


2 


15 




1 


142 


2213 


27 


023 


5657 


100 



[2!] 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

Preclinical Sciences 
i. Anatomy 

This course includes both gross and microscopical anatomy. 
The gross anatomy is taught by lectures, demonstrations and 
student dissection of the cadaver. The microscopical work is 
directly correlated with the gross dissection and includes a de- 
tailed study of prepared slides. Significant embryological infor- 
mation is included in the lectures. 

60 Hours, First Year 
Instructor to be appointed 

2. Bacteriology and Pathology 

The study of the habits and morphology of microorganisms 
emphasizing those of pathogenic character; sources, modes and 
prevention of infection; disinfection and asepsis; the more im- 
portant tissue changes occurring in the healing process, infec- 
tions and neoplasms; clinical microscopy of the blood and blood 
grouping; kidney function and urinalysis. Practical demonstra- 
tions and applications will be made which will relate directly 
to nursing. The blood group of each student will be ascertained 
and recorded. Lectures, recitations and laboratory. 

44 Hours, First Year — Bacteriology 

22 Hours, First Year — Pathology 

Dr. Wheeler, Dr. Stillman and Miss Thomas 

3. Chemistry 

A course designed to acquaint students with the fundamental 
principles of inorganic and physiological chemistry with special 
application to nursing practice. Studies in the general composi- 
tion of the blood and urine, and in the digestion and utilization 
of foods are included. Lectures, recitations and laboratory. 

60 Hours, First Year 
Dr. Gottschall 

4. Materia Medica 

A course designed to acquaint the student with the funda- 
mental weights, measures, terms and symbols used in the 
preparation and administration of drugs, common antiseptics, 
disinfectants and other solutions. A study of important and com- 
monly used drugs; their preparation, dosage, administration, 
physiological and therapeutic actions, idiosyncrasies, cumulative 
and minor toxic symptoms, antidotes and emergency treatments. 
Emphasis is placed on the accurate administration of drugs and 

[22] 



the careful observation of their effects through supervised prac- 
tice in nursing courses. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Wilson 
5. Physiology 

This course is designed to give a basic understanding of the 
functions of the normal human body as an essential prerequisite 
to the study of health and nutrition and the pathological changes 
due to disease. Lectures, recitations, laboratory and demonstra- 
tions. 

45 Hours, First Year 
Instructor to be appointed 

Medical Nursing 

1. Medicine 

Medical aspects of diseases are considered in these lectures 
and clinics. Material presented will supplement, emphasize or 
interpret required reading covering etiology, sources of infec- 
tion, symptomatology, usual course, pathology, complications, 
treatment, prognosis and prevention. 

35 Hours, First Year 
Dr. DuBois and staff 

2. Communicable Diseases 

A study of communicable diseases, including tuberculosis. 

Special emphasis is placed upon etiology, modes of transmission 

and prevention. Lectures and clinics. 

25 Hours, First Year 
Dr. DuBois and staff 

3. Principles of Medical Nursing Including Communicable Dis- 

ease Nursing 
Through lectures, clinics and demonstrations, students are 
taught principles and methods of nursing as applied to the care 
of medical patients. In the third year emphasis is placed upon 
managerial and teaching problems. 

15 Hours, First Year 

8 Hours, Third Year 
Miss Parker, Miss Wilson and Miss Daum 

4. Practice of Medical Nursing Including Communicable Dis- 

ease Nursing 
Supervised practice and study of the application of medical 
nursing principles and methods to the care of patients on the 
medical pavilions of the hospital. In addition students study and 

[23] 



practice medical aseptic nursing as related to the care of patients 

suffering from communicable diseases including tuberculosis. 

Practice includes care of patients during day, evening and night. 

Demonstrations and conferences. 

952 Hours, First, Second and Third Years 
(Includes 192 hours of communicable disease nursing) 
Miss Parker, Miss Wilson, Miss Daum, Miss Arey, 
Miss Daniels and staff 

5. Practice in Care of Private Patients 

Application of principles of medical and surgical nursing to 

the care of private patients. 

192 Hours, Third Year 

Miss Moffatt, Miss Emmett and staff 

Nursing 

1. Orientation 

This course is designed to give the beginning student a general 
conception of the field of nursing; the responsibilities and obliga- 
tions of each individual in choosing the profession; the impor- 
tance of general conduct in building up the right habits of living 
and attitudes of the nurse. Includes lectures in personal hygiene 
emphasizing the importance of physical and mental health espe- 
cially as it relates to the life of the nurse and is reflected in her 
work. 

22 Hours, First Year 

No credit 

Miss Wolf, Miss Kennedy, Miss Frost 

2. Principles of Nursing 

A course designed to give the student a basic understanding 
of the principles of nursing with emphasis upon her attitude 
toward her patient, the existing social relationships, the physical 
requirements for the proper care of patients and the procedures 
found most helpful for the promotion of health. 

140 Hours, First Year 
Miss Wyatt 

3. Practice of Elementary Nursing 

The application of the theories of nursing in laboratory prac- 
tice, in the surgical supply room and in the actual care of con- 
valescent patients in the pavilions and out-patient department 
of the hospital. 

315 Hours, First Year 

Miss Wyatt, Miss Zorn and Miss Gaute 

[24] 



*W-*5»* 




1 



— 









NUTRITION AND COOKERY CLASS 



| ! 



1 a- 



4 




^ f^ ^ 




SURGICAL TECHNIQUE DEMONSTRATED TO FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS 



4- History of Nursing 

A survey of the historical development of nursing from its 

early conception to modern times. Lectures and recitations. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Wyatt 

5. Professional Adjustments I 

A general consideration of fundamental ethical and phil- 
osophical principles and their application to problems which arise 
in the practice of nursing. An attempt will be made to coordinate 
this course closely with each course of nursing practice through 
class discussions of pertinent problems. 

15 Hours, First Year 
Miss Wolf 

6. Professional Adjustments II 

Through a general survey of the nursing field, the student has 
an opportunity to learn the trends and advances in the profes- 
sion; the need and opportunities for specialized preparation; the 
importance and types of legislation; the activities of professional 
organizations and the obligations of their members. Lectures 
and recitations. 

15 Hours, Third Year 

Miss Wolf and Special Lecturers 

7. Emergency Nursing 

This course supplements the instruction in nursing and deals 
with the application of these principles to emergency situations 
in the home and community. It demonstrates also the methods 
of teaching first aid to various groups. Lectures and demonstra- 
tions. 

16 Hours, Third Year 
Dr. Redden 

See description of other courses in nursing relating to specific 
clinical fields. 

Nutrition 

1. Nutrition and Cookery 

An elementary course in normal adult human nutrition with 
emphasis upon the preparation and the utilization of food by 
the body in health. The nutrition requirements in childhood and 
pregnancy are taken up during the student's practice on those 
services. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Rynbergen 

[26] 



2. Diet Therapy 

A course designed to present the underlying principles in treat- 
ment of disease by means of special dietaries given concurrently 
with the lectures in Medical and Surgical Diseases. Lectures, 
recitations and laboratory. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Rynbergen 

3. Practice of Diet Therapy 

The application of the principles of diet therapy in super- 
vised practice on the pavilions in the hospital and in the out- 
patient clinic. Conferences and case studies. 

288 Hours, Second and Third Years 

Miss Gillam, Miss Rynbergen and Miss Perry 

and staff. 



Obstetrics and Gynecology 

1. Obstetrics and Gynecology 

This course deals with physiological and pathological changes 
during pregnancy, labor, and puerperium; the care of the nor- 
mal newborn; the nutrition of the mother and baby; the pre- 
vention of complications; the social significance of infant and 
maternal mortality; the relation of obstetrics to various gyneco- 
logical conditions; the results of infection and tumor growth and 
the required surgical interference and operative treatment. Lec- 
tures and clinics. 

45 Hours, Second Year 

Dr. Stander and staff 

Miss Crabtree and Miss Rynbergen 

2. Principles of Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing 

This course emphasizes the importance of prenatal instruc- 
tion, observation and care; infant, obstetrical and gynecological 
nursing procedure with particular attention to infections and 
their special therapy. Classes, demonstrations and conferences. 

15 Hours, Second Year 

Miss Hickcox, Miss Klein, Miss Geiger, 

Miss Geuss 

3. Practice of Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing 

Under supervised practice in the pavilions, nurseries, operat- 
ing rooms, labor and delivery rooms, and out-patient depart- 
ment, students have the opportunity to observe and care for 

[27] 



infants and obstetrical and gynecological patients. Nursing prac- 
tice, case studies and conferences. 

708 Hours, Second Year 

Miss Hickcox, Miss Doran, Miss Klein, 

Miss Geiger, Miss Geuss and staff 

Pediatrics 

1. Pediatrics 

This course deals with normal growth and development and 
the diseases of infancy and childhood, with emphasis on infant 
welfare, prevention of morbidity and mortality and infant nutri- 
tion. Lectures and clinics. 

30 Hours, Second Year 
Dr. Levine and staff 

2. Principles of Pediatric Nursing 

The basic principles in the care of well and sick infants and 
children are given together with the social, educational and nutri- 
tional aspects of their treatment and behavior as normal chil- 
dren. Classes, conferences and demonstrations. 
30 Hours, Second Year 
Miss Schubert, Miss Doran, Miss Boquist, Miss Sykes 

3. Practice of Pediatric Nursing 

This consists of supervised experience in aseptic nursing meth- 
ods in the care of infants and children in the pavilion, formula 
laboratory, premature nursery, out-patient department and nur- 
sery school. Case studies and conferences. 

708 Hours, Second Year 

Miss Schubert, Miss Doran, Miss Boquist, Miss Sykes, 

Miss Schnetzer, Miss Clark, Miss Johnson, 

Miss Correll and staff 

4. Development of Behavior in Children 

A study of the normal child and his behavior. The suscepti- 
bility of the child's behavior responses to the various details of 
family life and of school will be emphasized. Lectures and reci- 
tations. 

30 Hours, Second Year 
Professor Whitley 

Personal Hygiene and Public Health 

1. Personal Hygiene 

(8 hours — Included in Orientation Course.) 

[28] 




GOOD SPORTSMANSHIP 




A CANTER IX CENTRAL PARK 



2. Physical Education 

Each student will be required to participate in regular physical 
exercise designed primarily to maintain positive health with 
emphasis upon posture and corrective measures and to stimulate 
sportsmanship. 

128 Hours, First Year 

64 Hours, Second and Third Years 

Miss McDermott and Miss Anderson 

3. Social and Economic Aspects of Health and Disease 

A course of study given concurrently with the lectures on 
medical diseases emphasizing their social and economic aspects. 
It deals with the prevention of sickness and the promotion of 
health, with consideration of the contributing factors in home 
and community. Lectures and conferences. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Frost 

4. Family and Community Health 

A course of study given as preparation for practice in com- 
munity nursing. It considers the underlying principles of public 
health nursing; the aims and scope of health activities both pub- 
lic and private. Lectures, conferences, family case studies. 

20 Hours, Third Year 
Miss Frost 

5. Community Nursing Principles and Practice 

Supervised nursing practice in the out-patient department and 
in the home through affiliation with Henry Street Visiting Nurse 
Service. Contact with the home and observation of community 
agencies is also furnished in the out-patient department through 
the social service department and the tuberculosis district. 

384 Hours, Third Year 

Henry Street Visiting Nurse Service 

Miss Favell and staff 

192 Hours, Third Year 

Medical and Surgical Out-Patient Department 

Miss Frost, Miss Banfield, Miss Doran and staff 

Miss Josephi and staff 

Psychiatry 
1. Psychiatry 

A course of study designed to acquaint students with psycho- 
pathic conditions, their etiology, pathology and treatment. In- 

[30 J 



eluded in this course is an historical survey of psychiatry and 
the mental hygiene movement, a discussion of the problems most 
frequently found In the different periods of human develop- 
ment: nursery school age, pre-puberty, adolescent, climactic and 
senile. An introduction to the techniques and social agencies 
available in helping people meet their problems. 

45 Hours, Third Year 
Dr. Diethelm and staff 

2. Principles of Psychiatric Nursing 

This course is organized to give students an understanding 
of the basic principles in the nursing care of psychopathic pa- 
tients and the nursing procedures used in their treatment. 
Emphasis is placed also upon the relation of mental illness to 
physical illness and of early development to future adult life. 
Lectures, demonstrations and clinics. 

30 Hours, Third Year 

Miss Sprogell, Miss Corrigan, Miss Joinville, 

Miss Lewis, Miss Fitzsimmons and staff 

3. Practice of Psychiatric Nursing 

The application of the principles of psychiatric nursing 
through supervised practice in and conferences on the care of 
children and adults in the in-patient and out-patient depart- 
ments. Behavior studies and case studies. 
547 Hours, Third Year 

Miss Sprogell, Miss Corrigan, Miss Joinville, 
Miss Lewis, Miss Fitzsimmons and staff 

4. Special Therapeutics 

An opportunity is given the student to observe the application 
of hydrotherapy, occupational and recreational therapies to the 
needs of the individual patient. Conferences and supervised prac- 
tice. 

146 Hours, Third Year 

Miss Gunderson, Miss Hibbler and Mr. Lawson 

Psychology 

I. Elementary Psychology 

An introduction to the study of human behavior and the un- 
derlying principles of mental adjustments and habit formation. 
An effort is made to apply this study to the adjustment of the 
student to her own personality as it affects her professional life 

[3i] 



and to the better understanding of the adjustment of patients to 
their illnesses. Recitations and lectures. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Kennedy 
2. Psychology of Deviate Behavior 

Consideration of mental hygiene and a study of the deviations 
from usual behavior in adults and children to an understanding 
of such adjustments patients may profitably make to their ill- 
nesses. Lectures, recitations and clinics. 

15 Hours, First Year 
Miss Kennedy 

Development of Behavior of Children (See Pediatrics) 

Surgical Nursing 

1. Surgery 

Surgical aspects of diseases are presented in these lectures and 
clinics. Factors determining the need for surgical interference 
are discussed and the major steps in the operation outlined. 
Special emphasis is placed upon signs, symptoms and observa- 
tions which should be made both preceding and following opera- 
tion as well as upon points which should be stressed in nursing 
these patients. 

45 Hours, First Year 
Dr. Heuer and staff 

2. Principles of Surgical Nursing 

Through lectures, clinics and demonstrations students are 
taught the principles and methods of surgical asepsis and the 
nursing of surgical patients. In the third year emphasis is placed 
upon managerial and teaching problems. 

15 Hours, First Year 

8 Hours, Third Year 
Miss Parker, Miss Keller, 
Miss Grainger, Miss Hills 

3. Practice of Surgical Nursing 

Supervised practice and study of the application of surgical 
nursing principles to the care of pre-operative and post-opera- 
tive patients on surgical pavilions of the hospital. Practice in- 
cludes care of patients during the day, evening and night. Dem- 
onstrations and conferences. 

856 Hours, First and Third Years 

Miss Parker, Miss Keller, Miss Grainger, 

Miss Hills, Miss Daniels, Miss Arey and staff 

[32] 



4. Operative Technique 

This course is designed to give thorough preparation and to 
develop skill in surgical aseptic technique; to develop alertness 
to observations of significant changes in patients during the ad- 
ministration of anaesthetics; to develop dexterity and intelligent 
response in assisting with operations and in meeting emer- 
gencies in the general operating room and gynecological operat- 
ing room. 

15 Hours, lectures, demonstrations and conferences 
369 Hours, practice — Second Year 
Miss Parker, Miss Lyons, Miss Jensen and staff 



[33] 



THE SOCIETY OF THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 



Governors 

Henry G. Barbey .... 
Barklie McKee Henry 
Bronson Winthrop .... 
Augustine J. Smith .... 

Henry W. DeForest Joseph H. Choate, Jr. 

Cornelius N. Bliss Frank L. Polk 

Paul Tuckerman John Hay Whitney 

William Woodward William V. Astor 

Arthur Iselin George F. Baker 

G. Beekman Hoppin Langdon P. Marvin 
R. Horace Gallatin 



President 
Vice-President 
Treasurer 
Secretary 

H. Williamon Pell 
George T. Bowdoin 
Robert Winthrop 
F. Higginson Cabot, Jr. 
Henry S. Sturgis 
Paul P. Pennoyer 



Administrator In Chief 
Murray Sargent 

Assistant to the Treasurer 
Walter J. Nichols 

Custodian 
United States Trust Company of New York 

Superintendent, New York Hospital 
R. Roger Hannon, M.D. 



COUNCIL OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 



Barklie McKee Henry, 
Livingston Farrand, M.D. 
Augustine J. Smith 
Murray Sargent 
Mary Beard, R.N. 



Acting Chairman 
Mary M. Roberts, R.N. 
Flora Rose 

Eugene F. DuBois, M.D. 
Henricus J. Stander, M.D. 



Anna D. Wolf, R.N. 



ALUMNAE COMMITTEE OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 



Lydia E. Anderson 
Minnie H. Jordan 



Mary Beard, Chairman 

Annie W. Goodrich, Vice-Chairman 
Lillian D. Wald 

[34] 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 

Executive-Curriculum Committee 

Anna D. Wolf, Chairman Verda Hickcox Sarah E. Moore 

Gertrude Ban field CoraKay Bessie A. R. Parker 

Halcie Boyer May Kennedy Agnes Schubert 

Harriet Frost Alice Maud Moffatt Carolyn e Sprogell 

Committee on Nursing Principles and Practices 

Carolyn e Keller, Chairman Hazel K.mmett Jeanette Walters 

Helen Clark Margaret Joinville Florence Wilson 

Committee on Admissions, Promotions and Graduation 

Mary Klein, Chairman 
Margaret Grainger Dorothy Jacobus Sarah E. Moore 

Committee on Library, Publications and Teaching Facilities 

May Kennedy, Chairman Helen Daum Eleanor Lewis 

Flory Bergstrom Harriet Frost Agnes Schubert 

Halcie Boyer Elizabeth Geiger 

Committee on Student and Staff Health 

Harriet Frost, Chairman Gertrude Banfield Helen Schnetzer 

Phyllis Anderson Elsie Davies Dr. Marian Tyndall 

Committee on Records 

May Kennedy, Chairman Verda Hickcox Bessie Parker 

Eleanor Corrigan Dorothy Jacobus Agnes Schubert 

Committee on Student Affairs 

Gertrude Banfield, Chairman 
Eleanor Corrigan Mary McDermott Bessie Parker 

Committee on Revisions and Resolutions 
Harriet Frost, Chairman Cora Kay Effie Sykes 

Committee on Student Loans 
Sarah E. Moore, Chairman Jeannette Peterson Carolyne Sprogell 



[35] 



OFFICERS OF 
ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY 

Anna D. Wolf, M.A., R.N. 

Director of the School of Nursing 
and Director of the Nursing Service 

B.A. Goucher College, 191 1; Diploma in Nursing, The Johns Hopkins 
Hospital School for Nurses, 191 5 ; M.A. Teachers College, Columbia 
University, 1916; Robb Fellow, Teachers College, Columbia University, 
1925-1926; Instructor and Assistant Superintendent of Nurses, The Johns 
Hopkins Hospital School for Nurses, 1916-1919; Instructor of Nursing, 
Vassar Training Camp for Nurses, Summer 1918; Superintendent of 
Nurses, Peking Union Medical College, Peking, China, 1919-1924; Dean 
of the School of Nursing, ibid., 1924- 1925 ; Associate Professor of Nursing 
and Superintendent of Nurses, The University Clinics, The University 
of Chicago, 1926-1929; Associate Professor of Nursing and Director of 
Nursing, ibid., 1929-193 1 ; Director of the School of Nursing and Director 
of the Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1931-. 

Harriet Frost, R.N. 

Associate Director, School of Nursing; 
Director, Public Health Nursing 

Diploma in Nursing, St. John's Hospital, Yonkers, 1906; Course in Public 
Health Nursing, Teachers College, Columbia University, 191 5- 19 16; As- 
sistant Superintendent and Superintendent of Nurses, St. John's Hospital, 
1908-1910; Superintendent, Mercer Hospital, Trenton, 1913-1915; Direc- 
tor, Department of Instruction, Visiting Nurse Society, Philadelphia, 1916- 
1932; Supervisor, Public Health Nursing Department, Pennsylvania 
School of Social and Health Work, 1919-1932; Associate Director, New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932- ; Director, Public Health Nurs- 
ing, ibid., 1932-. 

May Kennedy, M.A., R.N. 

Associate Director, School of Nursing; 
Director of Pedagogy 

Diploma in Nursing, St. Joseph's Hospital, Chicago, 1907; B.S. Teachers 
College, Columbia University, 191 7 ; M.A. University of Chicago, 1932; 
Chief Nurse, Illinois State Hospitals, 1907-1918; General Start Nurse and 
Chief Nurse, American Expeditionary Forces, France, 191 8-1 919; Super- 
intendent of Nurses, Indianapolis City Hospital, 1919-1920; Director of 
Nursing and Director of Illinois State School of Psychiatric Nursing, 
Illinois Department of Public Welfare, 1920-1932; Lecturer, University 
of Chicago, Summer Quarters, 1 928-1 931; Director of Institutes, 1922-; 
Lecturer, University of Wisconsin, one semester, 1931-1932; Lecturer, 
De Paul University, Summer Session, 1929; Associate Director, New 
York Hospital School of Nursing 1932- ; Director, Pedagogy, ibid., I93 2 ~- 

[36] 



ASSISTANT DIRECTORS 

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS & MEMBERS OE OTHER 

HOSPITAL DEPARTMENTS * 

Gertrude S. Banfield, B.A., R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing; 
Head of Out-Patient Nursing Instruc- 
tion and Service 

B.A. Vassar, 1918; Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of 
Nursing, New York, 1920; Assistant Head Nurse, Medical Ward, Pres- 
byterian Hospital, New York, 1920; General Start Nurse and Head 
Nurse, Out-Patient Department, Peking Union Medical College, Peking, 
China, 1 921 -1924; Supervisor, Max Epstein Clinics, The University of 
Chicago Clinics, 1927-193 1 ; Assistant Director, New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, 1932- ; Head of Out-Patient Nursing Instruction and Service, 
New York Hospital, 1932-. 

Halcie M. Boyer, PhB., R.N. 

Administrative Assistant, Night Nursing Service 

Special Certificate, Kansas State Teachers College, 1921 ; Diploma in 
Nursing, Illinois Training School for Nurses, 1928; Post-Graduate 
Course, Chicago Lying-In Hospital, 1930; PhB. The University of Chi- 
cago, 1935; Special Courses in the Department of Nursing Education, 
University of Chicago, 1935; Teacher, Kansas Public Schools, 1918-1924; 
Head Nurse, Woman's Surgical Ward, Cook County Hospital, 1928; Gen- 
eral Staff Nurse, The University of Chicago Clinics, 1928-193 1 ; Super- 
visor, Obstetrical Department and Instructor, Obstetrical Nursing, 
Deaconess Hospital, Buffalo, 1931-1932; Instructor, Obstetrical Nursing 
and Supervisor, Labor and Delivery Rooms, New York Hospital, 1932- 
1933 ; Evening Supervisor, Medical and Surgical Nursing Service, ibid., 
I 933" I 935; Administrative Assistant, Night Nursing Service, New York 
Hospital, 1 936-. 



Florence Eaton, B.A. 

Director, Payne Whitney 
Nursery School 

B.A. Colby, 1918; Part-time Student, Columbia University, 191 8 ; Stu- 
dent, Longy School of Music, Boston, 1921-1922; Part-time Student, 
Harvard Graduate School of Education and Boston University, 1923- 



* Arranged alphabetically. 

[37] 



1924; Diploma, Nursery Training School of Boston, 1925; Student, 
Summer Session, London Academy of Music, 1931 ; Director, Cambridge 
Nursery School, 1925-1932; Assistant Director and Director, Pre-School 
Summer Camps, 1924, 1927, 1932, 1934, 1935; Assistant Director, 
Nursery Training School of Boston, Summer, 1925; Instructor in Music, 
ibid., 1927-1932; Children's Supervisor, Vassar Summer Institute of 
Euthenics, 1928; Director, Out-Patient Nursery School, Payne Whitney 
Clinic, New York Hospital, 1932-1933; Director, Payne Whitney Nursery 
School, New York Hospital, 1933-. 

S. Margaret Gillam, M.A. 

Director, Department of Nutrition 

Teacher's Diploma, Home Economics, Mechanics Institute, Rochester, 
New York, 1916; B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1922; 
M.A., ibid., 1923; Dietitian, Rochester General Hospital, 1918-1919; 
Superintendent, Woman's Industrial Home, Medical Lake, Washington, 
1919-1921 ; Director, Dietetics and Housekeeping, University of Michigan 
Hospital, 1923-1932; Instructor, Institutional Management, Teachers 
College, Columbia University, Summers 1924-1930 and 1935- ; Instructor, 
Nutrition, Department of Public Health and Hygiene, University of 
Michigan, 1925-1932; Instructor in Nutrition, Extension Division, ibid., 
1930; Director, Department of Nutrition, New York Hospital, 1932-. 

Verda F. Hickcox, B.S., R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing ; 
Head of Obstetrical and Gynecological 
Nursing Instruction and Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School for Nurses, Chicago, 
1 91 6; Certificate of Public Health, Chicago School of Civics and Philan- 
thropy, 1919; B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1927; 
C. M. B., General Lying-in Hospital and School of Midwifery, London, 
England, 1928; Chief Nurse, Longfellow Mining and Accident Hospital, 
Morenci, Arizona, 1916-1918; General Staff Nurse, U. S. Army Base 
Hospital No. 13, France, 1918-1919; Psychiatric Social Worker, Psychi- 
atric Hospital, Dunning, Illinois, 1920; Community Nurse, American 
Red Cross, Morenci, Arizona, 1920-1922; Private Duty, 1922-1924; 
General Staff Nurse, University of Wisconsin Hospital, 1924-1925; Pri- 
vate Duty, 1925-1926; Supervisor, Visiting Nurse Association, York, 
Pennsylvania, 1927-1928; Instructor and Assistant to Director, Brooklyn 
Maternity Center Association, 1928; Instructor of Midwifery and Super- 
visor of Obstetrical and Gynecological Departments, Siriraj Hospital, 
Bangkok, Siam, 1929-1931; Consultant Nurse, Maternity, Infancy and 
Child Hygiene, New York State Department of Health, 1931-1932; As- 
sistant Director, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932- ; Head of 
Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing Instruction and Service, New York 
Hospital, 1932-. 

[38] 



Hannah L. Josephi, R.N. 

Director, Social Service 

Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1901 ; Part- 
time Student, New York School of Philanthropy, [913; Part-time Student, 
New School tor Social Research, [93] ; Supervisor, Private Patient Floor, 
New York Hospital, 1901-1902; Superintendent, House of Holy Com- 
forter, New York, 1902-1905; Superintendent of Hospital and Director, 
Nursing Service, Mountainside Hospital, 1907-1909; Director, Social 
Service, New York Hospital, 191 2-. 

Cora E. Kay, B.S., R.N. 

Administrative Assistant, Evening Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, St. Luke's Hospital School of Nursing, Chicago, 
1921 ; B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1936; Instructor, 
Nursing Principles and Practice and Supervisor of Wards, Allegheny 
General Hospital, Pittsburgh, 1921-1923; Assistant Superintendent of 
Nurses, St. Luke's Hospital School of Nursing, St. Louis, 1923-1926; 
Instructor, Nursing Principles and Practice, St. Luke's Hospital School of 
Nursing, Chicago, 1926-1927; Principal, School of Nursing and Director, 
Nursing Service, Chicago Memorial Hospital, 1927-1928; Instructor, 
Nursing Principles and Practice and Second Assistant to Superintendent 
of Nurses, Clifton Springs Sanitarium and Clinic, 1929-1932; Evening 
Supervisor, Medical and Surgical Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 
1932-1937; Administrative Assistant, Evening Nursing Service, ibid., 
I937-. 

Mary T. McDermott, M.A. 

Director, Nurses' Residence ; 
Instructor, Physical Education 

Diploma, Bouve Boston School of Physical Education, 191 6; Special 
Courses, Harvard University, 191 7, 191 9, 193 1 ; People's College, Den- 
mark, 1926; B.S. New York University, 1930; M.A. ibid., 1932; Super- 
visor, Physical Education, Third Supervisory District, Greene County, 
N. Y., 1915-1918; Supervisor, Physical Education, City Schools, Fitch- 
burg, Massachusetts, 1918-1919 ; Supervisor of Playground, Concord, 
Massachusetts, 1919; Supervisor, Physical Education, City Schools, Revere, 
Massachusetts, 1919-1921 ; Supervisor of Playground, Brookline, Massa- 
chusetts, 1 92 1 ; Director, Recreation and Physical Education, Stockbridge, 
Massachusetts, 1921-1922; Director, Recreation, City of New Haven, 
1922-1924; Director, Physical Education and Health, State Teachers 
College, Fitchburg. Massachusetts, 1924-1929; Director, Physical Edu- 
cation, Dalton Experimental School, New York, 1930-193 1 ; Assistant 
Director Student Activities, New York University, 1931-1932; Instructor, 
Physical Education, ibid.. Summer, 1932; Instructor, Physical Education, 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932- ; Director, Nurses' Resi- 
dence, ibid., 1 932-. 

[39] 



Alice Maud Moffatt, R.N. 

Head of Private Patients' Nursing Service 
Bishop Bethune College, Oshawa, Canada, 1904-1906; Diploma in Nurs- 
ing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1912; Private Duty, 1912- 
1915; General Staff Nurse, Hopital Militaire V. R. 76, France, 1915- 
191 6; Supervisor, Private Patients' Building, New York Hospital, 191 7- 
1932; Head of Private Patients Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 
1932-. 

Sarah E. Moore, R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing; 
Administrative Assistant, Day Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 191 3; Part- 
time Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, and New York 
University, 1914, 1926, 1927, 1928 ; Teacher, Public Schools, 1903-1908; 
Head Nurse, New York Hospital, 1913-1918; Instructor, Practical Nurs- 
ing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 191 8- 1922; Assistant Di- 
rectress of Nurses, ibid., 1923-1932; Acting Directress of Nurses, ibid., 
1932; Administrative Assistant, Day Nursing Service, New York Hos- 
pital, 1932-. 

Bessie A. R. Parker, R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing, 
Head of Medical and Surgical Nursing 
Instruction and Services. 

Graduate Provincial Normal School, Fredericton, N. B., Canada, 1905 ; 
Diploma in Nursing, Rhode Island Hospital Training School for Nurses, 
Providence, 191 8; Part-time Student, Teachers College, Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1932-1935; Full-time Student, ibid., 1936; Teacher, Public 
Schools, 1905-1915; Assistant Superintendent of Nurses and Instructor, 
Nursing Practice, Rhode Island Hospital Training School for Nurses, 
191 8- 1 920; Assistant Superintendent of Nurses and Instructor, Nursing 
Practice, Bridgeport General Hospital School of Nursing, 1 920-1 921 ; 
Assistant Superintendent of Nurses and Instructor, Nursing Practice, 
Methodist Episcopal Hospital School of Nursing, Brooklyn, 1921-1926; 
Superintendent of Nurses, ibid., 1926-1932; Administrative Assistant, 
Evening Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1932-1935; Assistant 
Director, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1936- ; Head of Medi- 
cal and Surgical Nursing Instruction and Services, New York Hospital, 
1936-. 

Agnes Schubert, M.S., R. N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing; 
Head of Pediatric Nursing Instruction 
and Service 

B.S. Northwestern University, 191 7; Diploma in Nursing, Western 
Reserve University School of Nursing, 1926; M.S. Teachers College, 

[40 1 



Columbia University, 1932; Supervisor, Babies' and Children's Hospital, 
Western Reserve University, 1926-1927; Assistant Instructor and Super- 
visor, ibid., 1927-1928; Assistant Director, ibid., 1928-1930; Supervisor 
and Instructor, Hobs Roberts Hospital, The University of Chicago Clinics, 
1930-1931; Assistant Director, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 
1932- ; Head of Pediatric Nursing Instruction and Service, New York 
Hospital, 1932-. 

Carolyne A. Sprogell, B.S., R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing; 
Director, Psychiatric Nursing 

Diploma in Nursing, St. Lukes Hospital School of Nursing, New York, 
1924; Post-graduate Course, Psychiatry, Bloomingdale Hospital, 1930; 
B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1936; Head Nurse, South- 
ampton Hospital, 1924; Night Supervisor, ibid., 1925; Private Duty, 
1926; Assistant Superintendent and Instructor, Practical Nursing, South- 
ampton Hospital, 1927-1928; Supervisor, St. Lukes Hospital, New York, 
1929; Assistant Director of Nurses, Bloomingdale Hospital, 1930-1931 ; 
Acting Director of Nurses, ibid., 1931-1932; Assistant Director, New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932- ; Director, Psychiatric Nursing, 
Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic, New York Hospital, 1932-. 



[41] 




CORNER IN STUDENT LOUNGE 




IN FICTION LIBRARY 



INSTRUCTORS AND SUPERVISORS * 

Pi Ksis S. Ari.y, R.N. 

Instructor and Night Supervisor, 
Medical and Surgical Nursing Services 

Diploma in Nursing, Rhode Island Hospital School of Nursing, 1921; 
Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1933-1934; Instructor, 

Nursing Principles and Practice, Rhode Island Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing, [921-1924; Assistant Instructor, Nursing Principles and Practice, 
Indiana University Hospital School of Nursing, 1926; Supervisor, Out- 
Patient Department, Providence Lying-in Hospital, 1927-1930; Super- 
visor, Obstetrical and Gynecological Department, Strong Memorial 
Hospital, 1931-1933; Supervisor, Maternity Department, Presbyterian 
Hospital, Philadelphia, 1935; Second Assistant Superintendent of Nurses, 
Rhode Island Hospital, 1936; Instructor, Medical and Surgical Nursing, 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1937- ; Evening Supervisor, Medi- 
cal and Surgical Nursing Services, New York Hospital, 1937-. 

Gertrude Victoria Boquist, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Pediatric 
Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Lutheran Hospital School of Nursing, Moline, 
Illinois, 1926; Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1928- 
1929 and 193 1 -1 932; General Staff Nurse, Obstetrical Service, Research 
and Educational Hospital, Chicago, 1927; General Staff Nurse, Albert 
Merritt Billings Hospital, The University of Chicago Clinics, 1927-1928; 
Head Nurse, Pediatric Service, Bellevue Hospital, Summer and Fall, 
1929; Supervisor, Children's Memorial Hospital, Chicago, 1929-1931 ; In- 
structor, Pediatric Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932- ; 
Supervisor, Pediatric Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1932-. 

Henrietta P. Boutox, B.A., R.N. 

Instructor, Medical Social 
Service Principles and Practice 

B.A. Wellesley College, 1906; Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1921 ; Part-time Student, Columbia University, 1924, 
193 1 ; Instructor, Medical Social Service Principles and Practice, New 
York Hospital Social Service Department, 1933-. 

Helen B. Clark, R.N. 

Instructor and Night Supervisor, 
Pediatric Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Massachusetts General Hospital, 1931, Student, 
Teachers College, Columbia University, Summer 1933 and Part-time 

* Arranged alphabetically. 

[43] 



Student, 1936-1937; Part-time Student, Simmons College, 1934-1935; 
Head Nurse and Instructor, Pediatric Nursing, Massachusetts General 
Hospital, 1931-1935; Head Nurse and Instructor, Pediatric Nursing, 
Nassau Hospital, 1935-1936; Instructor, Pediatric Nursing, New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1936- ; Night Supervisor, Pediatric Nursing 
Service, New York Hospital, 1936-. 

Barbara Correll, B.S. 

Dietitian, Children's Clinic 

B.S. Eureka College, Eureka, Illinois, 1928; Graduate of Dietetics, St. 
Luke's Hospital, New York, 1929; Dietitian, Madison Hospital, New 
York City, 1930-1932; Dietitian, Surgical Service, New York Hospital, 
1932-1935; Dietitian, Children's Clinic and Milk Formula Room, ibid., 
I935-. 

Eleanor M. Corrigan, R.N. 

Instructor and Administrative Assistant, 
Psychiatric Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, St. Luke's Hospital School of Nursing, New York, 
1927; Post-graduate Course in Psychiatry, Bloomingdale Hospital, 1932; 
Part-time Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, I933-I937J 
Operating Room Supervisor, St. Luke's Hospital, New York, 1929-1932; 
Head Nurse, Payne Whitney Clinic, New York Hospital, 1932-1935; 
Instructor, Psychiatric Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 
1935- ; Supervisor, Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic, New York Hos- 
pital, 1935-1937; Administrative Assistant, ibid., 1937-. 

Margaret E. Crabtree, B.S. 

Dietitian, Woman's Clinic 

B.S. University of Washington, 1932; Dietetic Certificate, King County 
Hospital, Seattle, 1932; Graduate Study, New York Hospital and Co- 
lumbia University, 1935; Dietitian, Northern State Hospital, Sedro 
Wolley, Washington, 1933-1935; Dietitian, Woman's Clinic, New York 
Hospital, 1935-. 

Virginia Daniels, R.N. 

Instructor and Evening Supervisor, 
Medical and Surgical Nursing Service 

Beloit College, 1923-1924; Frances Shimer Junior College, 1925-1926; 
Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, Chicago, 
1 930; Part-time Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1933- 
I 937>' General Staff Nurse, Presbyterian Hospital, Chicago, 1930-1931; 
Private Duty and Staff Nurse, Chicago Visiting Nurse Association, 1931- 
1932; General Staff Nurse, Medical and Surgical Nursing Service, New 
York Hospital, 1932-1934; Head Nurse, ibid., 1934-1936; Instructor, 

[44] 



Medical and Surgical Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 

1936- ; Evening Supervisor, Medical and Surgical Nursing Service, New- 
York Hospital, 1936-. 

Helen M. Daum, B.S.. R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, 
Medical Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1918; B.S. 
Teachers College, Columbia University, 1932; Private Duty Nursing, 
1918-1929; School Nursing, Ottawa, Illinois, 1929-1930; Head Nurse, 
Medical Pavilion, New York Hospital, 1932-1934 5 Instructor, Medical 
Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1934" ; Assistant Medical 
Supervisor, New York Hospital, I934-I935J Supervisor, Medical Nursing 
Service, ibid., 1935-. 

Catharine Dimock, B.S. 

Dietitian, Nutrition Clinic 

B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1935; Student Dietitian, Food Clinic, 
Boston Dispensary, 1935-1936; Dietitian, Nutrition Clinic. New York 
Hospital, 1936-. 

Ruth Doran, B.A., R.N. 

Instructor, Public Health Nursing 

B.A. University of Illinois, 1921 ; Diploma in Nursing, Johns Hopkins 
Hospital School for Nurses, 1924; Certificate in Midwifery, Lobenstine 
Midwifery Clinic, 1934; Part-time Student, Teachers College, Columbia 
University, 1934 and 1936; Head Nurse and Night Supervisor, Woman's 
Clinic, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 1924-1927; Head Nurse, Medical Ward, 
Albert Merritt Billings Hospital, 1927-1928; Instructor, Ophthalmological 
Nursing, Wilmer Clinic, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 1929- 1930; Evening 
Supervisor, Albert Merritt Billings Hospital, 1 930-1 931 ; Director, Ob- 
stetrical Nursing Service, St. Louis Maternity Hospital, 1932- 1936; In- 
structor, Public Health Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 
I937-. 

Hazel Emmett, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor 
Private Patient Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1920; Super- 
visor, Urological Service, New York Hospital, 1921 ; Supervisor, Ad- 
mitting and Emergency Ward, ibid., 1921-1923; Supervisor, Operating 
Rooms, ibid., 1924-1927; Private Duty, 1927-1928; Supervisor, Operating 
Rooms, Fifth Avenue Hospital, 1928-1936; Instructor, Private Patient 
Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1936- ; Supervisor, Pri- 
vate Patient Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1936-. 

[451 



Laura Wood Fitzsimmons, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, 
Psychiatric Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, The Army School of Nursing, 1926; Part-time 
Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1933-1937; Head Nurse, 
Walter Reed Hospital, 1926- 1929; Supervisor, Psychiatric Department, 
Gallinger Hospital, 1928-1933; Instructor, Psychiatric Nursing, New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, 1933- ; Assistant Night Supervisor, 
Payne Whitney Clinic, New York Hospital, 1933; Night Supervisor, ibid., 
1934-1937; Day Supervisor, ibid., 1937-. 

Elin Friberg, R.N. 

Instructor and Assistant Night Supervisor, 
Psychiatric Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Long Island College Hospital, 1932; Post-Graduate 
Course in Psychiatry, Bloomingdale Hospital, 1932- 1933; Part-time Stu- 
dent, Teacher's College, Columbia University and Hunter College, 1934- 
I 937> General Staff Nurse, Payne Whitney Clinic, 1933-1934; Assistant 
Head Nurse, ibid., 1934- 1935; Instructor, Psychiatric Nursing, New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, 1935- ; Assistant Night Supervisor, 
Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic, New York Hospital, 1935-. 

Elizabeth E. Geiger, R.N. 

Instructor New Born Care and Supervisor of 
Nurseries, Obstetrical Nursing Service. 

Student, Illinois Woman's College, 1919-1921 ; Diploma in Nursing, Wes- 
ley Memorial Hospital School of Nursing, 1924; Part-time Student, 
University of Chicago, 1934- 1936; Supervisor, Pediatric Department, 
Wesley Memorial Hospital, 1925-1927; Supervisor, Out Patient Depart- 
ment, Northwestern University Medical School, 1927-1933; Head Nurse, 
Pediatric Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1933; Supervisor, ibid., 
1933-1934; Supervisor, Staff Health Service and Director, Social Activi- 
ties, Children's Memorial Hospital, Chicago, 1934-1936; Instructor, New 
Born Care, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1936- ; Supervisor of 
Nurseries, Obstetrical Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1936-. 

Catherine P. Geuss, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, 

Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing Service 

Diploma in Teaching, Northeast Missouri Teachers College, 1924; 
Diploma in Nursing, Michael Reese Hospital School of Nursing, 1928; 
Diploma, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Woman's Hospital, New York, 
1929; Student, University of Chicago, 1930; B.S. and Diploma in Super- 

[46] 



vision, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1932; Teacher, 1919- 
1924; Head Nurse and Instructor, Obstetrical Nursing, Michael Reese 
Hospital, 1929-1930; Supervisor, Surgical Wards, ibid., 19301931; 
Instructor, Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing, New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1932- ; Assistant Supervisor, Obstetrical and Gyneco- 
logical Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1932-1935; Supervisor, ibid., 
I935-. 



Margaret F. Grainger, B.A., R.N. 

Instructor and Surgical Supervisor, 
Surgical and Urological Nursing Service 

B.A. Butler University, 1927; Diploma in Nursing, Johns Hopkins 
Hospital School for Nurses, 1930; Head Nurse, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 
1 930- 1 93 1 ; Assistant Director, Practical Nursing, Johns Hopkins Hos- 
pital School for Nurses, 1931-1934; Assistant Superintendent of Nurses, 
Johns Hopkins Hospital, 1934-1935; Instructor, Surgical and Urological 
Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1935- ; Supervisor, Sur- 
gical and Urological Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1935-. 



Elizabeth Harmon, B.A., R.N. 

Instructor and Night Supervisor, 
Medical and Surgical Nursing Service 

B.S. College of Wooster, 1928; Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hos- 
pital School of Nursing, Chicago, 1931 ; General Staff Nurse, Presbyterian 
Hospital, Chicago, 1931-1932; General Staff Nurse, New York Hospital, 
1932-1934; Head Nurse, ibid., I934- J 937; Instructor, Medical and Surgi- 
cal Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1937- ; Night Super- 
visor, Medical and Surgical Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1937-. 



Thirza L. Hills, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor 
Surgical Nursing Service 
University of Illinois, 1916-1918; Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hos- 
pital School for Nurses, Chicago, 1925; Student, University of Chicago, 
Summer, 1927; Course in Public Health Nursing, Henry Street Settle- 
ment, two months, 1936; Staff nurse, Presbyterian Hospital, Chicago, 
1925-1926; Assistant Night Supervisor, ibid., 1926-1927; Instructor, 
Surgical Procedures, ibid., 1928-1929; Head Nurse, ibid., 1929-1932; 
Head Nurse, Obstetrical Service and Surgical Service, New York Hos- 
pital, 1932-1935; Instructor. Surgical Nursing, New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1935- ; Supervisor, Surgical Nursing Service, New 
York Hospital, 1935-. 

[47] 



Margaret Joinville, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, 
Psychiatric Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, The Army School of Nursing, 1929; Part-time Stu- 
dent, Hunter College and Teacher's College, Columbia University, 1933- 
1937; Private Duty, 1 929-1 931; Assistant Head Nurse, Bloomingdale 
Hospital, 1931-1932; Head Nurse, Payne Whitney Clinic, 1932-1936; 
Instructor, Psychiatric Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 
1 936-; Supervisor, Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic, New York Hos- 
pital, 1 936-. 

Caroline Keller, B.A., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Surgical 
Nursing Service 

B.A. Smith College, 1921 ; Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital 
School of Nursing, New York, 1929; Instructor, Miss Day's School, 
New Haven, 1921-1924; Instructor, The Holman School, Philadelphia, 
1924-1925; Head Nurse, Surgical Ward, New Haven Hospital, 1929- 
1930; Assistant Supervisor, Surgical Nursing, New Haven Hospital, 
1930-1932; Instructor, Surgical Nursing, New York Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1932- ; Supervisor, Surgical Nursing Service, New York Hos- 
pital, 1932-. 

Mary Elizabeth Klein, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Obstetrical 
and Gynecological Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Hahnemann Hospital School of Nursing, 1916; 
B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1936; Supervisor, Private 
Hospital, Guayaquil, Ecuador, 1917-1918; Private Duty, 1918-1921 ; 
Supervisor, Private Floors, Hahnemann Hospital, 1921-1925; Supervisor, 
Operating Rooms, ibid., 1925-1928; Head Nurse, Maternity Hospital, 
Western Reserve University, 1 929-1 930; Supervisor and Assistant In- 
structor, ibid., 1 930- 1 932; Instructor, Obstetrical and Gynecological Nurs- 
ing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932- ; Supervisor, Obstetrical 
and Gynecological Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1932-. 

Eleanor Lewis, B.A., B.N., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Psychiatric 
Out-Patient Nursing Service 

B.A. Radcliffe College, 1925; B.N. Yale University School of Nursing, 
1928; Nurse in Charge, Urological Clinic, New Haven Hospital, 1928- 
1929; Psychiatric Nursing, Four Winds Sanatorium, Katonah, New York, 
1 929- 1 932; Assistant Head Nurse, Children's Service, Payne Whitney 

[48] 



Clinic, New York Hospital, 1932-1933; Staff Nurse, ibid., 1933-1934; 
Staff Nurse, Brooklyn Visiting Nurse Association, 1934-1935; Instructor, 
Psychiatric Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1935- ; 
Supervisor, Psychiatric Out-Patient Nursing Service, Payne Whitney 
Clinic, New York Hospital, 1935-. 



Veronica Lyons, B.A., R.N. 

Instructor, Operative Technique and 
Practice; Supervisor, General 
Operating Rooms. 

Cornell University, 1921-1922; Diploma in Nursing, Johns Hopkins Hos- 
pital School for Nurses, 1927; B.A. Teachers College, Columbia Univer- 
sity, 1936; Head Nurse, Gynecological Ward, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 
1927-1928; Head Nurse, Surgical and Gynecological Ward, Binghamton 
City Hospital, 1928- 1929; Assistant Supervisor, Operating Room, Moore- 
Overton Hospital, Binghamton, 1929; Office Assistant, Eye, Ear, Nose 
and Throat Surgeon, 1929-193 1 ; Instructor, Nursing Principles and 
Practice, Montefiore Hospital School of Nursing, 1931-1932; Head Nurse, 
Woman's Clinic, New York Hospital, 1932-1935; Assistant to Director 
of Nurses, New Rochelle Hospital, 1936-1937; Instructor, Operative 
Technique and Practice, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1937- ; 
Supervisor, General Operating Rooms, New York Hospital, 193 7-. 

Lucy J. Macdonald, R.N. 

Supervisor, Private Operating Room 

Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1927; Part- 
time Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1927; Head Nurse, 
Surgical Ward, New York Hospital, 1927; Suture Nurse, Public Oper- 
ating Room, ibid., 1928-193 1 ; Supervisor, Private Operating Room, ibid., 
1932; Head Nurse, Emergency Pavilion, New York Hospital, 1932-1933; 
Supervisor, Private Operating Room, ibid., 1934-. 

Ethel Oatman, R.N. 

Instructor and Night Supervisor, 
Psychiatric Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Butler Hospital School of Nursing, 1929; Part-time 
Student, Brown University, 1929-1930; Part-time Student, Syracuse Uni- 
versity, 1935-1936; Part-time Student, Hunter College, 1937; Assistant 
Head Nurse and Head Nurse, Butler Hospital, 1929-1930; Private Duty, 
1931 ; General Staff Nurse, Syracuse Memorial Hospital, 1932-1936; 
Head Nurse, Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic, 1936; Instructor, Psy- 
chiatric Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1937- ; ^ig nt 
Supervisor, Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic, 1937-. 

[49] 



Mabel W. Perry, B.S. 

Dietitian, Nutrition Clinic 

B.S. Battle Creek College, 1933; Dietetic Certificate, Montefiore Hospi- 
tal, 1934; Dietitian, Food Clinic, Boston Dispensary, 1934; Associate 
Dietitian, Food Clinic, Beth Israel Hospital, Boston, 1935; Research Die- 
titian, Diagnostic Hospital, New England Medical Center, Boston, 1935- 
1936; Dietitian, Burrough's Newsboys Foundation Health Education De- 
partment, Boston, 1934-1936; Dietitian, Nutrition Clinic, New York 
Hospital, 1936-. 

Jeannette Peterson, R.N. 

Instructor and Night Supervisor, 

Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Augustana Hospital Training School for Nurses, 
1929; Student, Colorado State Teachers College, Summer, 1933; Student, 
Hunter College, Fall of 1934 and 1936; Night Supervisor, Labor and 
Delivery Rooms, Augustana Hospital, 1929; Supervisor, Obstetrical De- 
partment, Immanuel Hospital, Omaha, 1929-1931 ; Supervisor, Obstetri- 
cal Department, Greeley Hospital, Greeley, Colorado, 1932; General 
Staff Nurse, U. S. Veterans' and Women's and Children's Hospital, 
Albuquerque, New Mexico, 1933; General Staff Nurse, U. S. Veterans' 
Administration Hospital, Fort Lyon, Colorado, 1934; General Staff Nurse, 
Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1934; 
Instructor, Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing, New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1934- ; Supervisor, Obstetrical and Gynecological 
Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1934-. 

Henderika J. Rynbergen, B.S. 

Instructor, Nutrition 

B.S. Simmons College, 1922; Nutrition Worker Neighborhood Kitchen, 
Boston, 1 922- 1 924; Food Clinic Dietitian, Washington University Dis- 
pensary, Barnes and Allied Hospitals, St. Louis, 1924-1926; Head Dieti- 
tian, Sea View Hospital, New York, 1927; Ward Dietitian, Presbyterian 
Hospital, New York, 1927-1928; Food Clinic Dietitian, Vanderbilt Clinic, 
ibid., 1928-1929; Dietitian, American University Hospital, Beirut, Syria, 
1929-1934; Instructor in Nutrition, New York Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing, 1 934-. 

Helen Schnetzer, R.N. 

Instructor and Evening Supervisor, 
Pediatric Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, St. Vincent's Hospital School of Nursing, 1930; 
Part-time Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1930-1932, 
1935-1936; Full-time Student, ibid., 1934-1935; Second Assistant and In- 
structor, Pediatric Nursing, New York Nursery and Childs Hospital, 

[50] 



1930193 2 ; Camp Nurse, summer, 1932; Assistant Head Nurse, Pediatric 
Metabolism Unit, New York Hospital, 1932-1934; Instructor, Pediatric 
Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1935- ; Evening Super- 
visor, Pediatric Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1935-. 

Ethel M. Sykes, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Pediatric 
Nursing Service 

Teaching Certificate, West Riding Education Department, Yorkshire, 
England, 1921 ; Student, Geneseo Normal School, Summer 1925; Diploma 
in Nursing, Geneva General Hospital School of Nursing, 1929; B.S. 
Teachers College, Columbia University, 1936; Assistant Infants', Mistress, 
Westerton Council School, Yorkshire, England, 1 921-1924; School 
Teacher, 1925-1926; Head Nurse, Medical Ward, Pediatric Department, 
Bellevue Hospital, 1929; Assistant Teaching Supervisor, Pediatric De- 
partment, ibid., 1929-1932; Supervisor in Charge, Pediatric Department, 
ibid., 1932-1933; Instructor, Pediatric Nursing Service, New York Hos- 
pital School of Nursing, 1933-; Supervisor, Pediatric Service, New York 
Hospital, I933-- 

Jeanette Walters, R.N. 

Instructor and Evening Supervisor, Obstetrical 
and Gynecological Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Temple University Hospital School of Nursing, 
1923; Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, Summer 1924, 
Part-time Student, ibid., 1933, 1934, 1935; Post-Graduate Course, Ob- 
stetrics, Woman's Hospital, New York, 1932; Supervisor, Medical and 
Surgical Ward, Temple University Hospital, 1924-1925; Supervisor, 
Babies' Hospital, Philadelphia, 1926-1928; Assistant Superintendent, Co- 
lumbia Hospital, 1928-1929; Supervisor, Obstetrical Department, Temple 
University Hospital, 1930; Instructor, Obstetrical and Gynecological 
Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932- ; Evening Super- 
visor, Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing Service New York Hospital, 
1932-. 

Florence K. Wilson. M.A., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Medical 
Nursing Service 

B.A. University of Michigan, 1913; Vassar Training Camp for Nurses, 
Summer 1918; Diploma in Nursing, City Hospital School of Nursing, 
New York, 1920; Study of Cost of Nursing Education under Direction 
of May Ayres Burgess, Western Reserve University School of Nursing, 
1930; Study of Duties of Supervisors, Western Reserve University School 
of Nursing, 1931 ; M.A. Western Reserve University, 1931 ; Author, 
Ward Study Units in Medical Nursing; Private Duty, New York City, 
1 92 1 ; Staff Nurse, Henry Street Visiting Nurse Association, 1922; In- 

[51] 



structor and Supervisor in Medical Nursing, The Lakeside Hospital and 
Western Reserve University School of Nursing, 1923- 1929; Supervisor, 
University of Nebraska Hospital, 1932-1934; Instructor, Medical Nursing, 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1934-. Supervisor, Medical Nurs- 
ing Service, New York Hospital, 1934-. 

Margaret Wyatt, B.A., R.N. 

Instructor, Nursing Principles and Practice 

B.A. Meredith College, 1923; Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1927; Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, 
Summers 1931-1935; Instructor and Assistant to the Dean of Women, 
Meredith College, 1923-1924; Head Nurse, Surgical Ward, New York 
Hospital, 1927-1930; Instructor, Nursing Principles and Practice, New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, 1930-. 



52] 



HEAD NURSES AND CHARGE NURSES 
ASSISTANT INSTRUCTORS 



Medical and Surgical Services 



Ida T. Addy, R.N. 
Marjorie Arehart, R.N. 
Margaret A. Bissell, R.N. 
Mrs. Margit J. Brandt, R.N. 
Elizabeth L. Brodie, R.N. 
Vivian Brophy, R.N. 
Olga Chernek, R.N. 
Fern E. Christensen, R.N. 
Virginia Cockes, R.N. 
Barbara Derr, R.N. 
Isabel Donnelly, R.N. 

Katherine 



Zorn 



Mrs. Edna L. Eckel, R.N. 
Eleanor Greenway, R.N. 
Helena H. Hurn, R.N. 
Mary F. Kyer, R.N. 
Marie A. Lalime, R.N. 
Dorothy E. Meyer, R.N. 
Frances A. Morrison, R.N. 
Emily Rogers, B.A., R.N. 
Sylvia C. Stearin, R.N. 
Eva V. Steinburg, R.N. 
Hazel W. Walker, R.N. 
R.N. 



Out-Patient Service 



Mrs. Anne Beard, R.N. 
Evelyn S. Clark, R.N. 
Alcida H. Coulter, R.N. 
Irene Curley, R.N. 
Mrs. Katherine Drucklieb, R.N. 
Elsie M. Fiege, R.N. 



Martha Johnson, R.N. 
Lucile M. Lambert, R.N. 
Evelyn Liddle, R.N. 
Pauline M. Murphy, R.N. 
Mrs. Elsa Nussbaumer, R.N. 
Mrs. Celia Pehr, R.N. 



Margaret Rouchleau, R.N. 



Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic 



Stella Copley, R.N. 
Inez Gnau, R.N. 
Martin Grothe, R.N. 
Beatrice Healy, R.N. 
Enid Kircaldie, R.N. 



Alice E. Claflin, R.N. 
Sarah M. Ferguson, R.N. 



Mary Kutz, R.N. 
John Moffat, R.N. 
George O'Malley, R.N. 
Jessie Weaver, R.N. 
Arlene Wilson, R.N. 
Orpha Wood, R.N. 

Pediatric Service 

Norween K. Fisher, R.N. 
Margaret Kelly, R.N. 



Mildred M. Stone, R.N. 



Private and Semi-Private Services 



Alma Blenkin, R.N. 
Alice E. Burlin, R.N. 
Mrs. Marie B. Clarke, R.N. 
Mildred Harrington, R.N. 
Geraldine Hettema, R.N. 
Dorothy Hobart, B.A., R.N. 



Helen F. Callon, R.N. 
Henrietta Eppink, R.N. 
Dorothy S. Fisher, R.N. 
Edith Gaeckle, R.N. 
Beulah M. Hartman, R.N. 
Wilma C. Hawkinson, R.N. 



L. Marguerite McGrath, R.N. 
Philomene M. Marshall, R.N. 
Sylvia Otterbein, R.N. 
Jeanette Stone, R.N. 
Myrna E. Wight, R.N. 
Helen Yesulaitis, R.N. 



fVo, 



Clinii 



Eda E. Hoewischer, R.N. 
Mildred A. Jensen, R.N. 
Veronica Matus, R.N. 
Edith Nielsen, R.N. 
Rose Valpreda, R.N. 
Ruth B. Wilson, R.N. 



[53] 



ASSISTANT HEAD NURSES 
DAY AND NIGHT SERVICES 



Medical and Surgical Services 



Margaret M. Baxter, R.N. 

Adelia C. Beale, R.N. 

Anna E. Biddle, R.N. 

Mrs. Ruth A. Brockman, R.N. 

Beulah E. Detrick, R.N. 

Eunice V. Doeblin, R.N. 

Antoinette T. Fedorowicz, R.N. 

H. ESTELLE FOLLIS, R.N. 

Dorothy R. Gaunt, R.N. 
Charlotte R. Grawn, R.N. 
Jessica Harsen, R.N. 



Marion Hartman, R.N. 
Josephine K. Hummel, R.N. 
Evelyn S. Linton, R.N. 
Ruth C. McLellan, R.N. 
Helen E. McLeod, R.N. 
Margaret R. Mullens, R.N. 
Elizabeth H. Ray, B.A., R.N. 
Charlotte E. Sowers, R.N. 
Charlotte Steuer, R.N. 
Lillian Tomasini, R.N. 
Mrs. Geneva H. Tujague, R.N. 



Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic 

Virginia App, R.N. Grace Lundgren, R.N. 

Samuel Cloud, R.N. Lenora MacKay, R.N. 

Paul Hanlon, R.N. Marguerite Nicolai, R.N. 

James MacLeod, R.N. 



Pediatric Service 



Mildred Maw, B.A., R.N 
Della Meachard, R.N. 



Agnes H. Rieman, R.N. 
Louisa Schwarz, R.N. 
Ruth E. Woodfall, R.N. 



Private and Semi-Private Services 



Jean E. Blampied, R.N. 
Agnes G. Damaska, R.N. 
Frances J. Gilgun, R.N. 
Frances R. McGrath, R.N. 
Gwendolyn Mahon, R.N. 
Catherine M. Moran, R.N. 



Veronica Morris, R.N. 
Mollie E. Parker, R.N. 
Mrs. Virginia S. Sweeney, 
Bernice Thompson, R.N. 
Ruth C. Whitford, R.N. 
Frances L. Wilson, R.N. 



R.N. 



Woman's Clinic 



Margaret L. Benson, R.N. 
Mrs. Florence Campbell, R.N. 
Marciana Cortes, R.X. 
Mary Eleanor Friedrichs, R.N. 
Lillian F. Giddens, R.N. 
Helen M. Golden, R.N. 
Eunice E. Greenwood, R.N. 
Virginia G. Henry, R.N. 



Alberta Johnson, R.N. 
Grace Dorothy Kingsley, R.N. 
Mary C. Littler, R.N. 
Ferne M. Parent, R.N. 
Thelma Stone, B.A., R.N. 
Pearl E. Trombly, R.N. 
Loretta Ellen Wright, R.N. 
Louise Woermbke, R.N. 



STUDENT AND STAFF HEALTH 



Marian Tyndall, M.D Physician-in-Charge 

Phyllis Greenacre, M.D Consultant Psychiatrist 

Elsie Davies, R.N Supervisor, Infirmary 

[54] 



ASSISTANTS IN ADMINISTRATION 

Flora Josephine Bergstrom, R.N Librarian 

Ella Bullen, B.A Secretary 

Helen Cleary Secretary 

Dorothy Jacobus, B.A Secretary-Registrar 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY MEDICAL COLLEGE FACULTY 
AND OTHERS PARTICIPATING IN INSTRUCTION* 



Gertrude Gottschall, Ph.D. 
Ralph G. Stillman, M.D. . 
Ruth Thomas, A.B., C.P.H. 



Assistant in Bio-Chemistry 

Assistant Professor of Clinical Pathology 
Instructor, Applied Bacteriology 



George W. Wheeler, M.D Assistant Professor of Bacteriology 



Eugene F. DuBois, M.D., and Staff . 
Oskar Diethelm, M.D., and Staff . 
George S. Heuer, M.D., and Staff . 
Samuel Z. Levine, M.D., and Staff . 
Henricus J. Stander, M.D., and Staff 



Professor of Medicine 

Professor of Psychiatry 

Professor of Surgery 

Professor of Pediatrics 

Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology 



Camille Gaute Instructor of Massage 

R. C Redden, M.D Director, First Aid, American Red Cross 

Mary T. Whitley, Ph.D 

Professor of Psychology, Teachers College, Columbia University 

MEMBERS OF AFFILIATING ORGANIZATIONS 

Hazel Corbin, R. X Maternity Center Association 

General Director 

Katharine Favell, M.A., R.X Visiting Xurse Service, 

General Director of Xursing Henry Street Settlement 

* Arranged alphabetically. 

[55] 



I 




ON THE WAY TO HOSPITAL 



THE SOCIETY OF THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 



THE 

NEW YORK HOSPITAL 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 



Supplementary Announcement 
GRADUATE COURSES 

1937-1938 



VOLUME V NUMBER 1 




I II u'IML 



ii ill i ii ill ^ !Vv H 




THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL SOUTH VIEW 



J 



GENERAL STATEMENT 

The New York Hospital School of Nursing offers to grad- 
uate nurses courses in Medical Nursing, Obstetrical and Gyne- 
cological Nursing, Psychiatric Nursing, Surgical Nursing and 
Operating Room Management. These courses are designed for 
nurses desiring a broader basic preparation in one specific branch 
of clinical nursing and for those who are seeking information 
and experience in the modern methods of care and treatment. 

The Faculty and Facilities for Study 

Instruction is given by the faculties of the New York Hospital 
School of Nursing and the Cornell Medical College. The Clin- 
ical Departments of the New York Hospital, the Payne Whitney 
Psychiatric Clinic and the Lying-in Hospital, integral parts of 
the New York Hospital, offer unusual opportunities for practice 
in the selected fields. The hospital has a capacity of nine hun- 
dred and eleven beds for acutely ill patients and one hundred and 
thirty-one bassinettes for newborn infants, with approximately 
one hundred and twenty-five operations weekly and an active 
out-patient department for the study of ambulatory patients. 

The library of the school of nursing contains over fifteen 
hundred volumes besides pamphlets on medicine, nursing and 
allied subjects as well as current publications. The Cornell 
Medical College library is available to students of the nursing 
school. In addition to these main libraries, reference materials 
are available on the various floors of the hospital. 

Matriculation Requirements 

An applicant for admission should be between the ages of 
twenty-two and thirty-five, a graduate of a high school of good 
standing and of an accredited school of nursing. She must also 
be a registered nurse and present evidence of personal and pro- 
fessional fitness for the special type of nursing for which she has 
applied. Arithmetic with emphasis upon ratio, percentage and 
the metric system should be reviewed before admission. 

In addition to the general requirements for admission, an 

[3] 



applicant for the course in Operating Room Management will 
be required to present evidence of the following: 

1. Satisfactory completion of not less than six weeks' experience in a 
general operating room while an under-graduate student. 

2. At least six months' additional experience in an operating room as 
a graduate nurse. 

3. Experience of at least one year as a head nurse or an assistant head 
nurse. 

4. Graduation from a school of nursing within five years. 

Concerning Admission 

Applications for admission should be addressed to the 
Director of the School of Nursing, 525 East Sixty-eighth 
Street, New York, New York, and should be sent as early as 
possible preceding the term in which the applicant desires to 
enter the school. 

Registration is always on the day preceding the date of admis- 
sion. All students will be expected to remain through the day 
of registration for the succeeding term. 

Admission Dates 

1937 1938 

Medical Nursing — September 1, Decern- September 1, Decem- 
ber 1 ber 1 

Obstetrical Nursing — February 1, May 1, February 1, April 30, 

June 1, September 1, June 1, September 1, 

October 1, December October 1, December 

31 31 

Psychiatric Nursing — February 1, June 1, February 1, June 1, 

October 1 October 1 

Surgical Nursing — March 1, May 1, July March 1, April 30, 

1, September 1, Octo- July 1, September 1, 

ber 30, December 31 November 1, Decem- 
ber 31 

Operating Room Management — The first of each month. 

Health Regulations 

Each applicant is required to present evidence of physical fit- 
ness before admission. She should have had smallpox vaccina- 
tion within the past seven years and typhoid inoculation within 
the past three years. Each student registered for obstetrics is 

[4] 



required to have had a negative Schick test and a report of a 
Dick test; immunization for positive Schick test is obligatory. 
An applicant registering for this course is also required to pre- 
sent a report of two successive negative throat cultures for 
streptococcus hemolyticus taken within two weeks prior to the 
date of admission. Another throat culture will be taken on 
arrival at the school and subsequently as indicated. 

The school of nursing maintains a health service for all 
students. Gratuitous infirmary care for graduate students will 
be limited to two weeks for a student in the school less than six 
months, and four weeks for those in the school six months or 
more. If infirmary care is required over these alloted times, it 
must be paid for at the rate of $1.00 per diem by the student. 

Free hospital service is not given graduate students. Arrange- 
ments for necessary hospitalization may be made through the 
hospital admissions office. Expenses for special nursing care and 
and special therapies such as blood transfusions and medications 
must be borne by the student. 

Expense 

The school of nursing provides each student with room, 
board and laundry an3 gives a monthly allowance of ten dollars. 
This maintenance and stipend are considered a working scholar- 
ship. 

A matriculation fee of ten dollars, a health service fee of five 
dollars and a house activity fee of fifty cents for six months or 
less are required of each student at the time of registration. 
These fees are not refundable. 

Each student is required to purchase handbook, note-books, 
nursing manuals and metric system card costing approximately 
two dollars and fifty cents. 

Each student is also required to pay a deposit for room key, 
locker key and post office key amounting to twenty-five cents 
each. These fees are refundable at the completion of the 
course. 

Each student must provide her own uniform and should wear 
the graduate or the student uniform, with cap, of her own school. 
Low heeled white or black shoes with rubber lifts must be worn. 

[5] 



Curriculum 

Each department has a special curriculum, a description of 
which follows. The schedule includes theory and practice with 
conferences and case studies amounting approximately to fifty- 
two hours per week day and fifty-six hours per week night. A 
maximum of four weeks of evening or night duty may be re- 
quired. The students are expected to attend classes, to do 
assigned reference reading, to write case studies and term papers 
and to participate in class discussion. 

At the end of the course if the student has satisfactorily met 
all requirements a transcript of her record of scholastic achieve- 
ment in class and nursing practice will be given to her. A fee 
of one dollar is charged for each additional transcript. 

Medical Nursing 

Advisor: Bessie A. R. Parker, R.N. 

Head of Medical and Surgical 
Nursing Instruction and Services. 

This course is designed for the graduate nurse who desires to 
broaden her background in medical diseases and to learn the 
newer methods used in the treatment and care of medical 
patients. 

The course is open to a limited number of students twice a 
year. 

Lectures, clinics, demonstrations and conferences 63 hours 

Nursing 120. Medical Diseases 40 hours 

Nursing 121. Principles of Medical Nursing 15 hours 

Diet Therapy 8 hours 

Nursing Practice 

Nursing 122. Practice in Medical Nursing 4 months 

Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing 

Advisor: Verda Hickcox, B.S., R.N. 
Head of Obstetrical and 
Gynecological Nursing 
Basic Course Instruction and Service. 

This course is designed for the graduate nurse who desires to 
learn newer methods in obstetrical and gynecological nursing and 

[6] 



to increase her skill in the care of the obstetrical and gynecologi- 
cal patient, and the newborn. 

For applicants who have had acceptable head nurse or super- 
visory experience in obstetrical nursing, or who offer adequate 
and satisfactory experience in this department, adjustments are 
made in the program of study to include units of the advanced 
course. 

Lectures, clinics, demonstrations and conferences 60 hours 

Nursing 130. Obstetrics and Gynecology 45 hours 

Nursing 131. Principles of Obstetrical and Gyne- 
cological Nursing 15 hours 

Nursing Practice 

Nursing 135. Practice in Obstetrical and 
Gynecological Nursing 
and Care of the Newborn 4 months 

Advanced Course 

Students of at least one year's satisfactory experience in nurs- 
ing and having personal qualifications of maturity, physical 
health, and definiteness of purpose may register for a second 
period of advanced study upon recommendation of the faculty 
of the department. 

Lectures and conferences 60-75 hours 

Required : 

Nursing 190. Ward Management 30 hours 

Nursing 191. Ward Teaching 30 hours 

Nursing 132. The Management of Obstetrical 

Units including bedside teaching, 15 hours 

Applicants having completed the required units of study may 
elect from the following list up to a total of 75 hours: 

Electives : 

Health Nursing 150. Social and Economic Aspects of 

Health and Disease 15 hours 

Nursing 181. Principles of Surgical Nursing 

Selected Unit on Operating Room Tech- 
nique 5 hours 

Health Nursing 151. Community Health 15 hours 

(Offered to group of not less than six) 

[7] 



Psychology 170. 

Psychology 171. 

Nursing 160 A. 
Nursing Practice 
Nursing 136. 



Elementary Psychology 30 hours 

(Available during Winter term only) 

Development of Behavior in Children 30 hours 

(Available during Winter term only) 

Psychiatry 45 hours 

Practice in Ward Management and Ward 

Teaching 4 months 



Psychiatric Nursing 

Advisor: Carolyne A. Sprogell, B.S., R.N. 
Director of Psychiatric Nursing 
Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic. 
Basic Course 

This course is designed for the graduate nurse who desires 
knowledge of the underlying organic, functional and social causes 
of mental illness, and the opportunity to acquire an understand- 
ing of the technique and skill in the care of mental patients. 

Lectures, clinics and conferences 210-270 hours 

The first four months: 

Nursing 160 A. Psychiatry 45 hours 

Nursing 161 A. Principles of Psychiatric Nursing.. 30 hours 
Nursing 163. Principles of Special Thera- 
peutics 15 hours 

The second four months: 

Health Nursing 150. Social and Economic Aspects 

of Health and Disease.... 15 hours 

Nursing 160 B. Psychiatry 15 hours 

Nursing 161 B. Principles of Psychiatric Nurs- 
ing 15 hours 

Nursing 190. Ward Management 30 hours 

Nursing 191. Ward Teaching 30 hours 

Psychology 1 70. Elementary Psychology 30 hours 

(Not available for students 
entering in February) 
(Available during Winter term only) 
Psychology 171. Development of Behavior in Chil- 
dren 30 hours 

(Available during Winter term only) 

[8] 



Nursing 167. The Management of Psychiatric 

Units 15 hours 

Nursing Practice 

Nursing 165. Practice in Psychiatric Nursing 8 months 

Surgical Nursing 

Advisor: Bessie A. R. Parker, R.N. 

Head of Medical and Surgical 
Nursing Instruction and Service. 
This course is designed for graduate students who desire a 
broader background in surgical nursing, and who wish to ac- 
quaint themselves with the more modern methods of surgical 
treatment of diseases. The course is limited to eight students 
admitted every two months. 

Lectures, clinics, demonstrations, and conferences 65 hours 

Nursing 180. Surgery 25 hours 

Nursing 181. Principles of Surgical Nursing 25 hours 

Health Nursing 150. Social and Economic Aspects 

of Health and Disease 15 hours 

Nursing Practice 

Nursing 182. Practice in Surgical Nursing 4 months 

Note: A period of two additional months' practice may be arranged for 
a limited number of students who have demonstrated their interest 
and fitness for the field chosen. In only one of these two months 
will it be possible to arrange for additional experience in the 
operating room. 

Operating Room Management 

This course, covering a period of six months, is planned to 
prepare a limited number of especially qualified nurses to become 
head nurses or assistant supervisors in a general operating 
room. 

Lectures, clinics, demonstrations and conferences 100-110 hours 

Required : 

Nursing 191. Ward Teaching 30 hours 

Nursing 184. Operating Room Management and 

Supervision 15 hours 

Electives : 

Nursing 180. Surgery 25 hours 

Nursing 181. Principles of Surgical Nursing 25 hours 

[9] 



Health Nursing 150. Social and Economic Aspects 

of Health and Disease.... 15 hours 
Practice 

Nursing 183. Practice Teaching of Operative 

Technique 15 hours 

Available to a limited number of 
students, depend upon their 
interest and qualifications. 
Nursing 185. Practice in Operating Room 

Technique and Management 6 months 

Description of Courses 

Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing 

Nursing 130. Obstetrics and Gynecology 45 hours 

This course deals with the physiological and pathological changes 
during pregnancy, labor and the puerperium ; the care of the normal 
newborn; the nutrition of the mother and baby; the prevention of 
complications; the social significance of infant and maternal mor- 
tality; the relation of obstetrics to various gynecological conditions; 
the results of infection and tumor growth and the required surgical 
interference and operative treatment. 
Lectures and clinics Dr. Stander and staff; Miss Rynbergen 

Nursing 131. Principles of Obstetrical and 

Gynecological Nursing 15 hours 

This course emphasizes the importance of prenatal instruction, obser- 
vation, and care; obstetrical and gynecological nursing procedures 
with particular attention to infections and their special therapy. 
Lectures, demonstrations and conferences Miss Hickcox and staff. 

Nursing 132. The Management of Obstetrical Units 

including bedside teaching 15 hours 

This course deals with housekeeping and managerial problems. It 
includes discussions related to ordering of supplies, care of equip- 
ment, organization of the department, estimations of needed per- 
sonnel, arrangement of schedules and hours of work and assignment 
of duties. 
Conferences Miss Hickcox and staff 

Nursing 135. Practice in Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing, 4 months 
This consists of supervised practice in the nursing procedures involved 
in the care of mothers and infants in the pavilions, nurseries, labor 
and delivery rooms and the out-patient department. In connection 
with the practice the student will write case studies, prepare papers 
on special subjects and participate in conferences. 

Miss Hickcox and staff. 

[10] 



Nursing 136. Practice in Ward Management and 

Ward Teaching 4 months 

Supervised practice in assisting the head nurse in the administration of 
the pavilion and the conduct of the pavilion teaching program, with 
emphasis on the particular field in which the student expects to 
function. 

Miss Hickcox and staff. 

Health Nursing 

Health Nursing 150. Social and Economic Aspects of Health 

and Disease 15 hours 

A course of study dealing with the prevention of sickness and the 
promotion of health with emphasis upon the social and economic 
factors in the home and in the community. 
Lectures and conferences Miss Frost 

Health Nursing 151. Community Health 15 hours 

This course considers the aims and scope of public health activities 
and the part of the nurse in this program. The relationship be- 
tween the hospital and other health and social agencies of the com- 
munity is emphasized. (Offered to group of not less than six.) 
Lectures and conferences Miss Frost 

Psychiatric Nursing 

Nursing 160A-160B. Psychiatry 60 hours 

This course deals with psychopathic conditions, their prevalence, social 

aspects, etiology, pathology, treatment, and prevention. 
Lectures and clinics Dr. Diethelm and staff 

Nursing 161A-161B. Principles of Psychiatric Nursing 45 hours 

This course deals with the basic principles in the nursing care of 
psychiatric patients and the nursing procedures used in their treat- 
ments. Emphasis is placed upon the relation between mental and 
physical illness and the effects of child behavior on future adult life. 

Lectures, clinics, demonstrations and conferences Miss Sprogell 

and staff. 

Nursing 163. Principles of Special Therapeutics 15 hours 

This course gives the student an understanding of the use of occupa- 
tional therapy and physiotherapy in the care of mentally ill patients. 

Lectures and conferences Miss Gunderson, Hiss Hibbler, 

and Mr. Lawson. 

Nursing 165. Practice in Psychiatric Nursing 8 months 

This course consists of supervised practice in the care of the psychiatric 
patient, which includes experience in the special departments as: 

[ii] 



out-patient department, adults and children, occupational, recrea- 
tional and hydrotherapy departments. It also includes a period of 
supervised observation and practice in the Payne Whitney Nursery 
School. 

Miss Sprogell and staff. 

Nursing 167. The Management of Psychiatric Units 15 hours 

This course deals with housekeeping and managerial problems. It 
includes discussions related to ordering of supplies, care of equip- 
ment, organization of the department, estimations of needed per- 
sonnel, arrangement of schedules and hours of work and assignment 
of duties. 

Conferences Miss Sprogell and staff 

Psychology 

Psychology 170. Elementary Psychology * 30 hours 

An introduction to the study of human behavior and the underlying 
principles of mental adjustments and habit formation. An effort 
will be made to apply this study to the adjustment of the student 
to her environment and to the better understanding of the adjust- 
ment of patients to their illnesses. (Not available for students 
entering in February.) 
Lectures and conferences Miss Kennedy 

Psychology 171. Development of Behavior in Children 3Q hours 

A study of the normal child and his behavior. The susceptibility of 

the child's behavior responses to the various details of family life 

and of school will be emphasized. (Available during Winter 

term only.) 

Lectures and conferences Professor Whitley 

Surgical Nursing 

Nursing 180. Surgery 25 hours 

This course includes a brief survey of a number of the special fields in 
surgery and the more recent developments in the surgical treatment 
of diseases. Emphasis is placed upon signs, symptoms, and observa- 
tions which should be made both preceding and following operations 
as well as upon essential points related to the physical care of the 
patient. 
Lectures and clinics Dr. Heuer and staff 

Nursing 181. Principles of Surgical Nursing 25 hours 

This course treats of the principles underlying the nursing care of 
surgical patients and affords an opportunity for observation and 

[12] 



discussion of new ways of applying these principles. A review of 
operating room technique is included. 
Lectures, demonstrations, and conferences Miss Park&r and staff. 

Nursing 182. Practice in Surgical Nursing 4 months 

Supervised practice is provided in the following services: general sur- 
gery, urology, out-patient, general operating room. 

Miss Parker, Miss Banfield and staffs. 

Operating Room Management 

Nursing 183. Practice Teaching of Operative Technique 15 hours 

This course provides students with the opportunity to conduct classes 
following the preparation of an outline and lesson plans in connec- 
tion with the course in ward teaching. 

Miss Parker, Mrs. Ray, Miss Lyons and staff. 

Nursing 184. Operating Room Management and Supervision. ...15 hours 
This course deals with the care and ordering of supplies and the care 
of rooms. It includes discussions related to organization of the 
department, estimations of needed personnel, arranging of schedules, 
of cases and hours of work, assignment of duties and participation 
in the plans for student teaching and the general supervision of the 
operating suite. 
Conferences Miss Parker, Miss Lyons and staff. 

Nursing 185. Practice in Operating Room 

Technique and Management 6 months 

The practice in operating room management includes observation, cir- 
culation, assisting at the operating table, night service, and responsi- 
bility for one operating room. The student will also have experi- 
ence in assisting with the supervision of student practice and the 
general administration of all of the general operating rooms. 

Miss Parker, Miss Lyons and staff. 

Nursing Education 

Nursing 190. Ward Management 30 hours 

The practical aspects of ward administration are discussed. The first 
half of the course is devoted to the physical unit, its equipment, 
care and replenishment. The second half is concerned with the 
organization of personnel, relationships between co-workers and 
members of other departments, and social contacts with patients and 
visitors. Students make application of class room problems to the 
specific fields in which they are interested. 
Lectures and conferences Miss Kennedy 

[13] 



Nursing 191. Ward Teaching 30 hours 

This course deals with the principles of learning and teaching and 
emphasizes learning activities and teaching methods. The confer- 
ence method is analysed and studied as the chief method in ward 
teaching. Students prepare lesson plans and demonstrate this 
method of instruction. 
Lectures and conferences Miss Kennedy 

Nursing 192. Supervision in Schools of Nursing 30 hours 

This course considers supervision from the administrative and educa- 
tional aspects. The principles of inspection, teaching, guidance, and 
research as they relate to supervision in schools of nursing are dis- 
cussed. The student plans programs of supervision in her special 
field and selects one project for special study to cover a four months 
period. (Time to be arranged.) 
Lectures and conferences Miss Kennedy 

MEDICAL NURSING 

Nursing 120. Medical Diseases 40 hours 

This course includes an introduction to general medicine, a survey 
of medical diseases, the latest and most approved methods of treat- 
ing these conditions and the nurse's place in assisting in the recog- 
nition of symptoms and in supplying the physical and mental care 
incident to the disease. 
Lectures and clinics Dr. DuBois and staff 

Nursing 121. Principles of Medical Nursing 15 hours 

The principles underlying the nursing care of medical patients are 

presented and discussed with emphasis on their application in the 

newer methods of caring for these patients. This includes the 

technique for medical asepsis. 

Lectures, demonstrations and clinics Miss Parker and staff 

Nursing 122. Practice in Medical Nursing 4 months 

This includes practice in general medicine, communicable diseases and 
out-patient service. Communicable diseases may or may not in- 
clude the exanthemata. 

Miss Parker, Miss Banfield and staffs. 



i 



[14] 



Administrative Officers of the School of Nursing 

Anna D. Wolf, MA., R.N. 

Director of the School of Nursing, 
Director of the Nursing Service. 

Harriet Frost, R.N. 

Associate Director, School of Nursing, 
Director, Public Health Nursing. 

May Kennedy, M.A., R.N. 

Associate Director, School of Nursiag, 
Director of Pedagogy. 

Gertrude S. Banfield, B.A., R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing, 

Head of Out Patient Nursing Instruction and Services. 

Verda F. Hickcox, B.S., R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing, 

Head of Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing Instruction and 
Services. 

Sarah E. Moore, R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing, 
Administrative Assistant, Nursing Service. 

Bessie A. R. Parker, R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing, 

Head of Medical and Surgical Nursing Instruction and Services. 

Agnes Schubert, MA., R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing, 

Head of Pediatric Nursing Instruction and Service. 

Carolyne A. Sprogell, B.S., R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing, 
Director of Psychiatric Nursing, 
Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic. 



[15] 



THE SOCIETY OF THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 



THE 

NEW YORK HOSPITAL 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 



ANNOUNCEMENT 
1938-1939 



VOLUME VII NUMBER I 



If after reading this bulletin there are 
further questions, please write to the Director 
of the School of Nursing, An application will 
be sent upon request if an applicant is able 
to satisfy the entrance requirements. 




THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL, SOUTH VIEW 



THE SOCIETY OF THE NEW YORK HOSPITAJ 

THE 

NEW YORK HOSPITAL 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Associated with Cornell University 




Announcement 

J 93 8 • x 939 



Volume vii 



Number i 



CALENDAR 



1938 

October 1 Matriculation and Registration (First 

year students) 

October 3 Winter Term begins — Classes convene 

October 12 Columbus Day (Not a holiday for first 

year students) 

November 24-27 . . . Thanksgiving Recess (First year stu- 
dents) 

November 24 .... Thanksgiving Day — A holiday 

December 24^. . . . Christmas Vacation (First year stu- 

January 2 / dents) 

December 25 Christmas Day — A holiday 

1939 

January 1 New Year's Day — A holiday 

January 3 Classes convene 

January 22 Winter Term ends 

January 23 Spring Term begins — Classes convene 

February 12 Lincoln's Birthday — A holiday 

February 22 Washington's Birthday — A holiday 

May 14 Spring Term ends 

May 15 Summer Term begins — Classes convene 

May 30 Memorial Day — A holiday 

July 4 Independence Day — A holiday 

September 4 Labor Day — A holiday 

September 30 Matriculation and Registration (First 

year students) 
October 1 Summer Term ends 

(Four weeks' vacation and three weeks' vacation 
within the summer term for second and first year 
students respectively; two weeks' vacation for 
third year students during psychiatric assignment.) 

October 2 Winter Term begins — Classes convene 

No classes will be held on the above noted holidavs. 



[ 5 ] 




LOBBY OF NURSES RESIDENCE 



GENERAL STATEMENT 



History 



THE New York Hospital, the second oldest hospital in 
America, maintained by private endowment, received its 
charter of incorporation under George the Third of England on 
the thirteenth day of June, 1 77 1 , under the title of the Society 
of the Hospital in the City of New York in America. Subse- 
quently by an Act of the Legislature in 18 10 the title was 
changed to The Society of The New York Hospital. 

The first systematic training for nurses, through lectures and 
practical instruction on the wards, was begun in 1799 under the 
direction and tutelage of Dr. Valentine Seaman and continued 
throughout his association with the hospital until 18 17. 

The school of nursing, an integral part of the hospital, cele- 
brated the sixtieth anniversary of its founding last year and 
points with just pride to its fourteen hundred graduates who 
have contributed to community services through administration 
and teaching in schools of nursing and in public health organiza- 
tions as well as in the field of private nursing. 

In June 1927 The New York Hospital formed an association 
with the Cornell University Medical College. The resources of 
each institution were increased and an extensive program of 
building was begun. The new plant situated on York Avenue 
between Sixty-eighth and Seventy-first Streets was opened Sep- 
tember 1932 and offers unusual opportunities and facilities for 
the progressive development of the school of nursing. 

The school of nursing is registered with the Regents of New 
York State which permits its graduates to take the state board 
examinations in order to secure state registration. 

The hospital is approved by the American College of Sur- 
geons, approved for internships by the American Medical Asso- 
ciation and is a member of the American Hospital Association. 



[ 7 ] 



Aims of the School of Nursing 

Nursing offers a challenge to young women with exceptional 
personal and professional qualifications who are interested in 
social welfare. The aim of The New York Hospital School 
of Nursing is to prepare carefully selected students in the 
fundamental principles of nursing in its various clinical aspects 
as applied to home, hospital and public health services, with 
emphasis upon health teaching. The development of the indi- 
vidual student as a responsible member of civic and social life is 
a significant outcome of the program. 

Facilities for the School 

A special building for the school of nursing is adjacent to the 
hospital buildings. It provides adequate and well equipped class- 
rooms, laboratories, library and recreation rooms as well as 
attractive and comfortable living accommodations for students 
and faculty. 

Further necessary laboratory and library facilities are avail- 
able through association with the Cornell University Medical 
College. 

The clinical facilities of The New York Hospital are unsur- 
passed for the care and study of patients. The hospital with a 
potential capacity of one thousand beds admits all types of 
patients including medical, surgical, obstetrical, gynecological, 
pediatric and psychiatric, and the out-patient department pro- 
vides ample opportunity for the study of ambulatory patients. 

Affiliation is made with the Henry Street Visiting Nurse Serv- 
ice for field experience in public health nursing and with the 
Maternity Center Association and the Lobenstine Clinic for 
observation in obstetrical nursing in homes and prenatal and 
postnatal instruction. 

The social service department of The New York Hospital 
participates in the nursing course through the integration of 
social service in the program of study. 



[ 8 ] 






Requirements for Admission 

The matriculation requirement is satisfactory graduation from 
an accredited high school or recognized preparatory school in 
which the following units of study have been taken : 

English 4 units 

History i unit 

Civics y 2 unit 

Mathematics 2 units 

(Algebra 1 unit; plane geometry 1 unit) 
Science 2 units 

(Chemistry required; physics advised) 
Foreign Language 3 units 

(Three units of one language or two in 

each of tw r o) 
Electives 3 l / 2 units 

Total 16 units 

Emphasis is placed upon scholarship of applicants. Preference 
in admission will be given to those w r ho have had advanced study. 
It is advised that prospective students from college have intro- 
ductory chemistry, zoology or biology, physics and psychology. 
All students should review arithmetic prior to admission. 

Exceptions to these matriculation requirements may be made 
only by offering substitutions satisfactory to the Committee on 
Admissions. 

Besides these scholastic admission requirements students 

11 should be at least nineteen and not over thirty years of age and 
; must present evidence of physical and personal fitness for nursing. 
A personal conference of the student and her parent or guard- 
ian with the director of the school of nursing is desirable and 
should be arranged after formal application has been submitted 
to the school. An appointment for an interview 7 will be made 
upon request. 

All applications for admission should be addressed to the 

[ 9 ] 



Director of the School of Nursing, 525 East Sixty-eighth Street, 
New York, New York. 

Citizenship Requirements 

According to the law of New York State every person ad- 
mitted to the examination for license as registered nurse in New 
York State at the termination of her course of study must sub- 
mit evidence that she is a citizen of the United States or has 
declared her intention of becoming a citizen. Such a license shall 
terminate and become void at the end of seven years from such 
declaration of intention if the holder has not become a citizen. 

Advanced Standing 

Advanced standing may be granted those students who pre- 
sent credentials showing satisfactory completion of courses of 
study taken in other schools deemed of similar or equal value 
to those given in The New York Hospital School of Nursing. 

An applicant who has received her baccalaureate degree may 
have her time in the school reduced by two or four months if 
she maintains a scholastic standing of an average of U B" grade 
in the first and second years provided this request is presented 
the last term of the second year. 

Accrediting by Cornell University 

To those students who may later wish to matriculate at the 
New York State College of Home Economics, Cornell Uni- 
versity, if they present all other necessary requirements, the 
curriculum of The New York Hospital School of Nursing will 
be credited to the amount of not less than forty-five hours, which 
is equivalent to one and a half academic years of college credit, 
toward the Bachelor of Science degree. 

The Curriculum 

The three-year curriculum of the school of nursing is so 
planned as to give each student a thorough understanding of 

[10] 




STUDENT CARES FOR CONVALESCENT PATIENT IN SOLARIUM 




THE PLAY TEACHER 



the basic sciences and principles underlying good nursing and 
of the best methods to use in the care of the sick, in the pre- 
vention of disease, and in health education. 

Each of the three school years is divided into terms of six- 
teen weeks each. 

During the first term and a half limited nursing practice is 
given in the pavilions of the hospital and the clinics of the out- 
patient department while a greater amount of time is spent in 
class and laboratory. In the subsequent seven and one-half terms 
the student's nursing practice increases in length of time and 
in responsibility. A sequence is planned to include the various 
types of clinical services during day, evening and night periods 
and visiting nursing in order that the student may acquire com- 
plete understanding of patients' needs. 

During these clinical terms each student is scheduled forty- 
eight hours per week which includes all class and nursing prac- 
tice assignments. 

Requirements of Scholarship and Graduation 

Students are graded in their studies on a basis of weighted 
quality points with an average of two quality points required 
for promotion without condition and graduation. 

The following grading system has been established: 

A — Excellent 4 quality points 

B — Good 3 quality points 

C — Average 2 quality points 

D — Pass 1 quality point 

F — Failure quality point 

I — Incomplete . . . Given in cases of absence and 

not because of poor scholarship 

Failure in any given subject may necessitate withdrawal from 
the school unless the student's scholarship is exceptional in other 
respects in which case repetition of the course may be recom- 
mended by the instructor. 

[ 12] 



Fees 

Matriculation Fee $10.00 

Payable at first registration; not refundable. 

Tuition Fee 100.00 

Payable at first registration $75.00 

Payable at beginning of second term, first 
year 25.00 

Not refundable. 

Laboratory Fee (Anatomy, Chemistry, Microbiol- 
ogy, Nursing, Nutrition, Physiology) 25.00 

Payable at first registration; not refundable. 

Chemistry Breakage Fee 5.00 

Payable at first registration; amount not used for 
breakage to be refunded, or excess breakage to be 
paid. 

Health Service Fee 20.00 

Ten dollars payable at first registration and five at 
beginning of first terms, second and third years. 

Graduation Fee 15.00 

Payable at beginning of third term, third year. Re- 
fundable if student is not graduated. 

Total Fees for The New York Hospital School 

of Nursing $175.00 

Tuition Fee for Henry Street Visiting Nurse 

Service 25.00 

Total School Fees $200.00 

In addition to these fees students pay a Student Activity Fee 
of $5.00 each year which is collected by the class treasurer. 

Maintenance and General Expenses 

The school of nursing provides maintenance and limited gra- 
tuitous care in case of illness and furnishes each student with 

[13] 



r 



mi 

♦♦♦♦Ml 




THE GREEN DINING ROOM 




STUDY IN THE LIBRARY 



the uniform and cap of the school which remain the property 
of the school until graduation. Note health regulations and 
service page 16. 

The following estimated expenses must be met by the student: 

istyr. 2nd yr. 3rdyr. Optional 

i st term 

Uniform aprons, bibs and 

accessories .... $22.00 $4.00 

Uniform shoes .... 8.50 8.50 8.50 

Uniform sweater . . . 4.00 

Uniform cape .... $15.00 

Rental of two laboratory 

coats 1. 00 

Rental of four Henry 

Street uniforms . . . 5.00 

Books, keys, bandage scis- 
sors and miscellaneous 
supplies 20.00 5.00 5.00 15.00 

Expenses for district visits 

and excursions . . . 5.00 5.00 15.00 



$60.50 £18.50 $37.50 $30.00 

None of the aforementioned articles should be purchased be- 
fore admission to the school. Students should be provided with 
an allowance for other personal needs determined by individual 
requirements. A list of limited necessary personal equipment 
will be sent each prospective student when accepted for admis- 
sion. For the three-year course the total cost to the student is 
estimated at three hundred and fifty dollars in addition to per- 
sonal expenditures as determined by the student. 

Registration and Orientation 

First-year students entering in the fall of nineteen hundred 
and thirty-eight must register at the school by ten o'clock on 
Saturday morning, October first; those entering in the fall 

[■5] 



of nineteen hundred and thirty-nine on Saturday, September 
thirtieth. 

A brief orientation program precedes formal instruction. 
During this time students take required psychological tests and 
an arithmetic pre-test, have necessary physical examinations with 
Schick, Dick and Mantoux tests, confer with faculty advisers 
and secure uniforms, books and other equipment. 

Health Regulations and Service 

The school of nursing maintains a health service for its stu- 
dents. A well equipped infirmary with necessary staff is pro- 
vided in the nurses' residence. A physical examination by the 
school physician with chest x-rays is required upon admission to 
the school and subsequent annual physical examinations will be 
given. 

Vaccinations against typhoid fever and smallpox will be re- 
quested of all students before admission to the school. Schick 
and Dick tests and immunization for positive reactions will be 
required of all students before or after admission to the school. 
Mantoux tests will be given during the pre-clinical period and 
for those who are negative will be repeated at regular intervals. 

Gratuitous infirmary care for minor illnesses will be limited 
to four weeks at any one time in the case of all students. For 
more serious illnesses students will be cared for gratuitously in 
the hospital for not more than two weeks at any one time for the 
first-year students and not more than four weeks at any one 
time for second and third year students. Expenses for special 
nursing care and special therapies must be borne by the student 
or her family. 

Vacations and Other Absences 

During the first and second years a vacation of four weeks 
is given and during the third year one of two weeks. For first- 
year students one week's vacation is planned at Christmas (see 
calendar) and three weeks during the summer term. For all 
second-year students a vacation of four weeks is planned dur- 

[16] 



ing the summer term of the year. For third-year students a two 
weeks' vacation is given during any one of the three terms. 
This vacation is not given to those students who have an ex- 
emption of time. 

All vacations are arranged by the school of nursing to con- 
form to the requirements of the educational program and the 
fields in which clinical practice is obtained. 

Except for first-year students during their first term, holidays 
are observed only in connection with class schedules. 

As a result of absences the repetition of a course of study 
or special examinations may be required; class registration may 
be changed and in necessary instances nursing practice will have 
to be made up. 

Student Loan Fund 

A student loan fund has been established to give necessary 
financial aid to those who show promise in nursing. These finan- 
cial benefits are not available to first-year students until after 
their first term's work. 

Applications for student loans should be made in writing to 
the Director of the School. 

EXTRA-CURRICULAR OPPORTUNITIES 

Believing that the education of young women today must 
include activities relating to healthful social relationships gen- 
erous provision for this development in the life of the student 
has been made. 

The beautiful fireproof, sixteen-story residence, erected adja- 
cent to the hospital buildings, is the center for these activities. 
Every effort has been made in its construction and equipment to 
provide for the normal and healthy life of students and faculty. 

Each of the eight student residence floors contains attractively 
furnished single bedrooms with lavatories, ample common baths, 
showers and toilet facilities, a common sitting-room with ad- 
joining kitchenette for informal gatherings and a laundryette. 

[17] 



Comfortable lounges, reading, reception and dining-rooms are 
on the first and ground floors. 

For further recreational activities, a large well equipped gym- 
nasium, billiard-room, game-room and porches are available. 
Arrangements for the use of an outdoor playground and an 
indoor swimming pool are made. 

To insure the full benefit and proper use of these facilities 
well qualified instructors are appointed to direct the social and 
recreational activities of the school. 

School Government 

The school of nursing has a cooperative government in which 
the students take an active part. A student organization has 
been established and works actively with the Faculty Committee 
on Student Affairs in all matters relating to social and profes- 
sional conduct and discipline. 

An annual student activities fee of five dollars is required and 
collected by each class. 



The Neiv York Hospital School of Nursing reserves the privilege of changing its 
curriculum, its educational policies and fees as are deemed advisable for the 
progressive development of the school. 



[ 18] 




A ROOM OF HER OWN- 




SUNDAY MORNING BREAKFAST IN THE FLOOR SITTING ROOM 



THE CURRICULUM 



First Year 



Class and Approximate 
Laboratory Hours Credit 
Hours Practice Hours 



Anatomy 60 

Chemistry 60 

Microbiology 66 

Physiology 45 

History of Nursing 30 

Elementary Psychology 30 

Psychology of Deviate Behavior . 15 

Introduction to Nursing Arts . . . 140 

Professional Adjustments I . 15 

Nutrition and Cookery 30 

Diet Therapy 30 

Social and Economic Aspects of Health 

and Disease 30 

Pharmacology and Therapeutics . . 30 

Medicine 35 

Communicable Diseases 25 

Medical Nursing 15 

Surgery 45 

Surgical Nursing 15 

(Orientation — 22 hours — no credit, in- 
cludes Personal Hygiene — 8 hours) 



480 
480 



2 

2 

2 

1V2 

2 

2 

1 

6/ 2 
1 

i/ 2 

2 
2 



Totals 716 



1275 



44 



[20] 



Second Year 



Class and Approximate r ,- 
aboratory 
Hours 



Medical Nursing 

Diet Therapy Practice 

Operative Technique 15 

Pediatrics 30 

Pediatric Nursing 30 

Obstetrics and Gynecology .... 45 
Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing 15 
Development of Behavior in Children 30 



nouis 
Practice 


Hours 


192 


1/2 


192 


1/2 


369 


4 




l& 


708 


sy 2 




3 


708 


7 




2 



Totals 165 2169 



29 



Third Year 



Medical Nursing 

Diet Therapy Practice 

Surgical Nursing 

Emergency Nursing 

Psychiatry 

Psychiatric Nursing 

Special Therapeutics 

Family and Community Health 

Community Nursing Practice 

Out Patient Nursing Practice 

Private Patient Nursing Practice 

Professional Adjustments II 



Totals 



8 


280 


2/2 


. . . 


96 


1 


8 


376 


3K2 


16 


. . . 


1 


45 




3 


30 


547 
146 


6 


20 


. . . 


1 




384 


3 




192 


2 




192 


2 


15 




1 


142 


2213 


27 


023 


5657 


100 



Grand Total Hours and Credit 



Two or more hours per week of bedside instruction and individual conferences, 
which approximate a total of two hundred and fifty hours, are included in the 
practice assignments. 



[21] 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

Preclinical Sciences 
i. Anatomy 

This course includes both gross and microscopical anatomy. 
The gross anatomy is taught by lectures, demonstrations and 
student dissection of the cadaver. The microscopical work is 
directly correlated with the gross dissection and includes a de- 
tailed study of prepared slides. Significant embryological infor- 
mation is included in the lectures. 

60 Hours, First Year 
Dr. C. L. Yntema 

2. Chemistry 

A course designed to acquaint students with the fundamental 
principles of inorganic and physiological chemistry with special 
application to nursing practice. Studies in the general composi- 
tion of the blood and urine, and in the digestion and utilization 
of foods are included. Lectures, recitations and laboratory. 

60 Hours, First Year 
Miss Rynbergen 

3. Microbiology 

The study of the habits and morphology of microorganisms 
emphasizing those of pathogenic character; sources, modes and 
prevention of infection; disinfection and asepsis; the more im- 
portant tissue changes occurring in the healing process, infec- 
tions and neoplasms; clinical microscopy of the blood and blood 
grouping; kidney function and urinalysis. Practical demonstra- 
tions and applications are made which relate directly to nursing. 
The blood group of each student is ascertained and recorded. 
Lectures, recitations and laboratory. 

66 Hours, First Year 

Dr. Wheeler, Dr. Stillman and Miss Thomas 

4. Pharmacology and Therapeutics 

A course designed to acquaint the student with the funda- 
mental weights, measures, terms and symbols used in the 
preparation and administration of drugs, common antiseptics, 
disinfectants and other solutions. A study of important and com- 
monly used drugs; their preparation, dosage, administration, 
physiological and therapeutic actions, idiosyncrasies, cumulative 
and minor toxic symptoms, antidotes and emergency treatments. 
Emphasis is placed on the accurate administration of drugs and 

[22] 



the careful observation of their effects through supervised prac- 
tice in nursing courses. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Daum 
5. Physiology 

This course is designed to give a basic understanding of the 
functions of the normal human body as an essential prerequisite 
to the study of health and nutrition and the pathological changes 
due to disease. Lectures, recitations, laboratory and demonstra- 
tions. 

45 Hours, First Year 
Miss Rynbergen 

Medical Nursing 

1. Medicine 

Medical aspects of diseases are considered in these lectures 
and clinics. Material presented will supplement, emphasize or 
interpret required reading covering etiology, sources of infec- 
tion, symptomatology, usual course, pathology, complications, 
treatment, prognosis and prevention. 

35 Hours, First Year 
Dr. DuBois and staff 

2. Communicable Diseases 

A study of communicable diseases, including tuberculosis. 

Special emphasis is placed upon etiology, modes of transmission 

and prevention. Lectures and clinics. 

25 Hours, First Year 
Dr. DuBois and staff 

3. Principles of Medical Nursing Including Communicable 

Disease Nursing 
Through lectures, clinics and demonstrations, students are 
taught principles and methods of nursing as applied to the care 
of medical patients. In the third year emphasis is placed upon 
managerial and teaching problems. 

15 Hours, First Year 
8 Hours, Third Year 
Miss Parker, Miss Daum and Miss Daniels 

4. Practice of Medical Nursing Including Communicable 

Disease Nursing 
Supervised practice and study of the application of medical 
nursing principles and methods to the care of patients on the 
medical pavilions of the hospital. In addition students study and 

[23] 



practice medical aseptic nursing as related to the care of patients 

suffering from communicable diseases including tuberculosis. 

Practice includes care of patients during day, evening and night. 

Demonstrations and conferences. 

952 Hours, First, Second and Third Years 
(Includes 192 hours of communicable disease nursing) 
Miss Parker, Miss Daum, Miss Daniels, Miss Arey, 
Miss Baxter, Miss Laline and staff 

5. Practice in Care of Private Patients 

Application of principles of medical and surgical nursing to 
the care of private patients. 

192 Hours, Third Year 

Miss Moffatt, Miss Hobart, Miss O'Brien and staff 

Nursing 
1. Orientation 

This course is designed to give the beginning student a general 
conception of the field of nursing; the responsibilities and obliga- 
tions of each individual in choosing the profession; the impor- 
tance of general conduct in building up the right habits of living 
and attitudes of the nurse. Includes lectures in personal hygiene 
emphasizing the importance of physical and mental health espe- 
cially as it relates to the life of the nurse and is reflected in her 
work. 

22 Hours, First Year 

No credit 

Miss Wolf, Miss Kennedy, Miss Frost 

a. Introduction to Nursing Arts 

A course designed to give the student a basic understanding 
of the principles of nursing with emphasis upon her attitude 
toward her patient, the existing social relationships, the physical 
requirements for the proper care of patients and the procedures 
found most helpful for the promotion of health. 

140 Hours, First Year 
Miss Wyatt 

b. Practice of Elementary Nursing 

The application of the theories of nursing in laboratory prac- 
tice, in the surgical supply room and in the actual care of con- 
valescent patients in the pavilions and out-patient department 
of the hospital. 

315 Hours, First Year 

Miss Wyatt, Miss Zorn, Miss Bradshaw and Miss Gaute 

[24] 







NUTRITION AND COOKERY CLASS 




SURGICAL TECHNIQUE DEMONSTRATED TO FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS 



2. History of Nursing 

A survey of the historical development of nursing from its 
early conception to modern times. Lectures and panel discussions. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Frost 

3. Professional Adjustments I 

A general consideration of fundamental ethical and phil- 
osophical principles and their application to problems which arise 
in the practice of nursing. An attempt is made to coordinate 
this course closely with each course of nursing practice through 
class discussions of pertinent problems. Lectures and recitations. 

15 Hours, First Year 
Miss Wolf 

4. Professional Adjustments II 

Through a general survey of the nursing field, the student has 
an opportunity to learn the trends and advances in the profes- 
sion; the need and opportunities for specialized preparation; the 
importance and types of legislation; the activities of professional 
organizations and the obligations of their members. Lectures 
and recitations. 

15 Hours, Third Year 

Miss Wolf and Special Lecturers 

5. Emergency Nursing 

This course supplements the instruction in nursing and deals 
with the application of these principles to emergency situations 
in the home and community. It demonstrates also the methods 
of teaching first aid to various groups. Lectures and demonstra- 
tions. 

16 Hours, Third Year 
Dr. Redden 

See description of other courses in nursing relating to specific 
clinical fields. 

Nutrition 

1. Nutrition and Cookery 

An elementary course in normal adult nutrition and in food 

preparation. The nutrition requirements in childhood and in 

pregnancy are discussed during the student's practice on pediatric 

and obstetric services. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Rynbergen 

[26] 



2. Diet Therapy 

A course designed to present the underlying principles in treat- 
ment of disease by means of special dietaries given concurrently 
with the lectures in Medical and Surgical Diseases. Lectures, 
recitations and laboratory. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Rynbergen 

3. Practice of Diet Therapy 

The application of the principles of diet therapy in super- 
vised practice on the pavilions in the hospital and in the out- 
patient clinic. Conferences and case studies. 

288 Hours, Second and Third Years 

Miss Gillam, Miss Rynbergen, Miss Perry 

and staff 



Obstetrics and Gynecology 

1. Obstetrics and Gynecology 

This course deals with physiological and pathological changes 
during pregnancy, labor, and puerperium; the care of the nor- 
mal newborn; the nutrition of the mother and baby; the pre- 
vention of complications; the social significance of infant and 
maternal mortality; the relation of obstetrics to various gyneco- 
logical conditions; the results of infection and tumor growth and 
the required surgical interference and operative treatment. Lec- 
tures and clinics. 

45 Hours, Second Year 

Dr. Stander and staff 

Miss Crabtree and Miss Rynbergen 

2. Principles of Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing 

This course emphasizes the importance of prenatal instruc- 
tion, observation and care; infant, obstetrical and gynecological 
nursing procedure with particular attention to infections and 
their special therapy. Classes, demonstrations and conferences. 

30 Hours, Second Year 
Miss Hickcox, Miss Klein, Miss Geiger, 
Miss Geuss 

3. Practice of Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing 

Under supervised practice in the pavilions, nurseries, operat- 
ing rooms, labor and delivery rooms, and out-patient depart- 
ment, students have the opportunity to observe and care for 

[27] 



infants and obstetrical and gynecological patients. Nursing prac- 
tice, case studies and conferences. 

693 Hours, Second Year 

Miss Hickcox, Miss Doran, Miss Klein, 

Miss Geiger, Miss Geuss and staff 

Pediatrics 

1. Pediatrics 

This course deals with normal growth and development and 
the diseases of infancy and childhood, with emphasis on infant 
welfare, prevention of morbidity and mortality and infant nutri- 
tion. Lectures and clinics. 

30 Hours, Second Year 
Dr. Levine and staff 

2. Principles of Pediatric Nursing 

The basic principles in the care of well and sick infants and 
children are given together with the social, educational and nutri- 
tional aspects of their treatment and behavior as normal chil- 
dren. Classes, conferences and demonstrations. 

30 Hours, Second Year 

Miss Schubert, Miss Doran, Miss Ferguson, Miss Royle 

3. Practice of Pediatric Nursing 

This consists of supervised experience in aseptic nursing meth- 
ods in the care of infants and children in the pavilion, formula 
laboratory, premature nursery, out-patient department and nur- 
sery school. Case studies and conferences. 

708 Hours, Second Year 

Miss Schubert, Miss Doran, Miss Stone, Miss 

Ferguson, Miss Royle, Miss Clark, Miss Coulter, 

Miss Correll and staff 

4. Development of Behavior in Children 

A study of the normal child and his behavior. The suscepti- 
bility of the child's behavior responses to the various details of 
family life and of school will be emphasized. Lectures and reci- 
tations. 

30 Hours, Second Year 
Miss Whitley 

Personal Hygiene and Public Health 

1. Personal Hygiene 

(8 hours — Included in Orientation Course.) 

[28] 




BASKETBALL IS HEALTHFUL RECREATIOX 



2. Physical Education 

Each student will be required to participate in regular physical 
exercise designed primarily to maintain positive health with 
emphasis upon posture and corrective measures and to stimulate 
sportsmanship. 

128 Hours, First Year 

64 Hours, Second and Third Years 

Miss McDermott and Miss Anderson 

3. Social and Economic Aspects of Health and Disease 

A course of study given concurrently with the lectures on 
medical diseases emphasizing their social and economic aspects. 
It deals with the prevention of sickness and the promotion of 
health, with consideration of the contributing factors in home 
and community. Lectures and conferences. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Frost 

4. Family and Community Health 

A course of study given as preparation for practice in com- 
munity nursing. It considers the underlying principles of public 
health nursing; the aims and scope of health activities both pub- 
lic and private. Lectures, conferences, family case studies. 

20 Hours, Third Year 
Miss Frost 

5. Community Nursing Principles and Practice 

Supervised nursing practice in the out-patient department and 
in the home through affiliation with Henry Street Visiting Nurse 
Service. Contact with the home and observation of community 
agencies is also furnished in the out-patient department through 
the social service department and the tuberculosis district. 

384 Hours, Third Year 

Henry Street Visiting Nurse Service 

Miss Favell and staff 

192 Hours, Third Year 

Medical and Surgical Out-Patient Department 

Miss Frost, Miss Banfield, Miss Abbott and staff 

Miss Josephi and staff 

Psychiatry 
1. Psychiatry 

A course of study designed to acquaint students with psycho- 
pathic conditions, their etiology, pathology and treatment. In- 

[30 J 



eluded in this course is an historical survey of psychiatry and 
the mental hygiene movement, a discussion of the problems most 
frequently found in the different periods of human develop- 
ment: nursery school age, pre-puberty, adolescent, climactic and 
senile. An introduction to the techniques and social agencies 
available in helping people meet their problems. 

45 Hours, Third Year 
Dr. Diethelm and staff 

2. Principles of Psychiatric Nursing 

This course is organized to give students an understanding 
of the basic principles in the nursing care of psychopathic pa- 
tients and the nursing procedures used in their treatment. 
Emphasis is placed also upon the relation of mental illness to 
physical illness and of early development to future adult life. 
Lectures, demonstrations and clinics. 

30 Hours, Third Year 

Miss Sprogell, Miss Corrigan, Miss Joinville, 

Miss Lewis, Miss Fitzsimmons and staff 

3. Practice of Psychiatric Nursing 

The application of the principles of psychiatric nursing 
through supervised practice in and conferences on the care of 
children and adults in the in-patient and out-patient depart- 
ments. Behavior studies and case studies. 
547 Hours, Third Year 

Miss Sprogell, Miss Corrigan, Miss Joinville, 
Miss Lewis, Mrs. Fitzsimmons and staff 

4. Special Therapeutics 

An opportunity is given the student to observe the application 
of hydrotherapy, occupational and recreational therapies to the 
needs of the individual patient. Conferences and supervised prac- 
tice. 

146 Hours, Third Year 

Miss Gunderson, Miss Hibbler and Mr. Lawson 

Psychology 

1. Elementary Psychology 

An introduction to the study of human behavior and the un- 
derlying principles of mental adjustments and habit formation. 
An effort is made to apply this study to the student's own per- 
sonality and give her a more scientific basis bv which she can 

[31] 



get a better understanding of the behavior of herself, her co- 
workers and her patients. Recitations and lectures. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Kennedy 
2. Psychology of Deviate Behavior 

A study of the deviations of adults and children, due to or- 
ganic and sociological factors, and of the nursing care necessary 
in assisting patients in making more adequate adjustments dur- 
ing illness. The principles of mental hygiene are emphasized. 

Lectures, recitations and clinics. 

15 Hours, First Year 

Miss Kennedy 
Development of Behavior of Children (See Pediatrics) 

Surgical Nursing 

1. Surgery 

Surgical aspects of diseases are presented in these lectures and 
clinics. Factors determining the need for surgical interference 
are discussed and the major steps in the operation outlined. 
Special emphasis is placed upon signs, symptoms and observa- 
tions which should be made both preceding and following opera- 
tion as well as upon points which should be stressed in nursing 

these patients. 

45 Hours, tirst Year 

Dr. Heuer and staff 

2. Principles of Surgical Nursing 

Through lectures, clinics and demonstrations students are 
taught the principles and methods of surgical asepsis and the 
nursing of surgical patients. In the third year emphasis is placed 
upon managerial and teaching problems. 

15 Hours, First Year 

8 Hours, Third Year 
Miss Parker, Miss Keller, Miss Grainger, 
Miss Hills and Miss Harmon 

3. Practice of Surgical Nursing 

Supervised practice and study of the application of surgical 
nursing principles to the care of pre-operative and post-opera- 
tive patients on surgical pavilions of the hospital. Practice in- 
cludes care of patients during the day, evening and night. Dem- 
onstrations and conferences. 

856 Hours, First and Third Years 

Miss Parker, Miss Keller, Miss Grainger, Miss Hills, Miss 

Arey, Miss Harmon, Miss Laline, Miss Baxter and staff 

[32] 



4. Operative Technique 

This course is designed to give thorough preparation and to 
develop skill in surgical aseptic technique; to develop alertness 
to observations of significant changes in patients during the ad- 
ministration of anaesthetics; to develop dexterity and intelligent 
response in assisting with operations and in meeting emer- 
gencies in the general operating room and gynecological operat- 
ing room. 

15 Hours, lectures, demonstrations and conferences 
369 Hours, practice — Second Year 
Miss Parker, Miss Lyons, Miss Jensen and staff 




STUDY IX A CONFERENCE ROOM 



[33] 



THE SOCIETY OF THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 



Officers 

Henry G. Barrey President 

Barklie Henry Vice-President 

Augustine J. Smith .... Secretary 

Bronson WlNTHROP .... Treasurer 



Henry W. de Forest 
Augustine J. Smith 
Bronson Winthrop 
Henry G. Barbey 
Cornelius N. Bliss 
Paul Tuckerman 
William Woodward 
Arthur Iselin 



Board of Governors 
G. Beekman Hoppin 
R. Horace Gallatin 
Joseph H. Choate, Jr. 
Frank L. Polk 
John Hay Whitney 
W. Vincent Astor 
Barklie Henry 
Langdon P. Marvin 
Williamson Pell 



Jr. 



George T. Bowdoin 
Robert Winthrop 
F. Higginson Cabot, 
Henry S. Sturgis 
Paul G. Pennoyer 
Livingston Farrand, M.D. 
Landon K. Thorne 
W. Gibson Carey 



Assistant to the Treasurer 
Walter J. Nichols 

Custodian 
United States Trust Company of New York 



Administrator-in-Chief 
Murray Sargent 

Superintendent 
R. Roger Hannon, M.D. 



COUNCIL OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Augustine J. Smith, Chairman 
Barklie Henry, Vice -Chair man 
Anna D. Wolf, R. N., Secretary 

Class of 1938 
Eugene F. Du Bois, M.D. Flora Rose 



Class of 1939 



Barklie Henry 



Mary M. Roberts, R.N. 



Class of 1940 
Augustine J. Smith Mary Beard, R.N. 

Ex-Officio 
Henry G. Barbey, President of The Society of the New York Hospital 
Edmund E. Day, President of Cornell University 
Murray Sargent, Administrator-in-Chief 

Henricus J. Sander, M.D., President of the Medical Board 
Anna D. Wolf, R.N., Director of the School of Nursing 

[34] 



ALUMNAE COMMITTEE OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Mary Beard, Chairman 

Lydia E. Anderson Annie W. Goodrich, lice -Chair man 

Minnie H. Jordan Lillian D. Wald 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 

Executive-Curriculum Committee 

Anna D. Wolf, Chairman Verda Hickcox Bessie A. R. Parker 

Gertrude Banfield Cora Kay Agnes Schubert 

Halcie Boyer May Kennedy Carolyne Sprogell 

Harriet Frost Alice Maud Moffatt Margaret Wyatt 

Sarah E. Moore 

Committee on Nursing Principles and Practices 

Margaret Wyatt, Chairman Helen Daum Margaret Joinville 

Caroline Keller, Secretary Sarah Ferguson Jeanette Walters 

Dorothy Hobart 

Committee on Admissions, Promotions and Graduation 

Mary Klein, Chairman Margaret Grainger Sarah E. Moore 

Eleanor Corrigan Dorothy Jacobus Margaret Wyatt 

Committee on Library, Publications and Teaching Facilities 

May Kennedy, Chairman Halcie Boyer Eleanor Lewis 

Persis Arey Harriet Frost Agnes Schubert 

Flora Bergstrom Elizabeth Geiger 

Committee on Student and Staff Health 

Harriet Frost, Chairman Gertrude Banfield Dr. Marian Tyndall 

Phyllis Anderson Elsie Davies Mrs. Louise Lincoln- 

Helen Clark 

Committee on Records 

May Kennedy, Chairman Verda Hickcox Cora Kay 

Mrs. Laura Fitzsimmons Dorothy Jacobus Agnes Schubert 

Committee on Student Affairs 

Gertrude Banfield, Chairman Mary McDermott Margaret Wyatt 

Eleanor Corrigan Bessie Parker 

Committee on Revisions and Resolutions 
Cora Kay, Chairman Dorothy Allison Harriet Frost 

Committee on Student Loans 
Sarah E. Moore, Chairman Carolyne Sprogell Lucy Macdonald 

[35] 



OFFICERS OF 
ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY 

Anna D. Wolf, M.A., R.N. 

Director of the School of Nursing 
and Director of the Nursing Service 

B.A. Goucher College, 191 1; Diploma in Nursing, The Johns Hopkins 
Hospital School for Nurses, 191 5 ; M.A. Teachers College, Columbia 
University, 1916; Robb Fellow, Teachers College, Columbia University, 
1 925- 1 926; Instructor and Assistant Superintendent of Nurses, The Johns 
Hopkins Hospital School for Nurses, 1916-1919; Instructor of Nursing, 
Vassar Training Camp for Nurses, Summer 1918; Superintendent of 
Nurses, Peking Union Medical College, Peking, China, 1 919-1924; Dean 
of the School of Nursing, ibid., 1924-1925; Associate Professor of Nursing 
and Superintendent of Nurses, The University Clinics, The University 
of Chicago, 1 926- 1 929; Associate Professor of Nursing and Director of 
Nursing, ibid., 1929-193 1 ; Director of the School of Nursing and Director 
of the Nursing Service, The New York Hospital, 1 93 1 -. 

Harriet Frost, R.N. 

Associate Director, School of Nursing; 
Director, Public Health Nursing 

Diploma in Nursing, St. John's Hospital, Yonkers, 1906; Course in Public 
Health Nursing, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1915-1916; As- 
sistant Superintendent and Superintendent of Nurses, St. John's Hospital, 
1908-1910; Superintendent, Mercer Hospital, Trenton, 1913-1915; Direc- 
tor, Department of Instruction, Visiting Nurse Society, Philadelphia, 1916- 
1932; Supervisor, Public Health Nursing Department, Pennsylvania 
School of Social and Health Work, 1919-1932; Associate Director, The 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932- ; Director, Public Health 
Nursing, ibid., 1932-. 

May Kexxedy, M.A., R.N. 

Associate Director, School of Nursing; 
Director of Pedagogy 

Diploma in Nursing, St. Joseph's Hospital, Chicago, 1907; B.S. Teachers 
College, Columbia University, 191 7 ; M.A. University of Chicago, 1932; 
Chief Nurse, Illinois State Hospitals, 1907-1918; General Staff Nurse and 
Chief Nurse, American Expeditionary Forces, France, 1918-1919; Super- 
intendent of Nurses, Indianapolis City Hospital, 1919-1920; Director of 
Nursing and Director of Illinois State School of Psychiatric Nursing, 
Illinois Department of Public Welfare, 1920-1932; Lecturer, University 
of Chicago, Summer Quarters, 1928-1931; Director of Institutes, 1922-; 
Lecturer, University of Wisconsin, one semester, 1931-1932; Lecturer, 
De Paul University, Summer Session, 1929; Associate Director, The New 
York Hospital School of Nursing 1932- ; Director, Pedagogy, ibid., 1932-. 

[36] 



ASSISTANT DIRECTORS 

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS & MEMBERS OF OTHER 

HOSPITAL DEPARTMENTS * 

Gertrude S. Banfield, B.A., R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing; 
Head of Out-Patient Nursing Instruc- 
tion and Service 

B.A. Vassar, 191 8; Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of 
Nursing, New York, 1920; Assistant Head Nurse, Medical Ward, Pres- 
byterian Hospital, New York, 1920; General Staff Nurse and Head 
Nurse, Out-Patient Department, Peking Union Medical College, Peking, 
China, 1921-1924; Supervisor, Max Epstein Clinics, The University of 
Chicago Clinics, 1 927-1931 ; Assistant Director, The New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1932- ; Head of Out-Patient Nursing Instruction and 
Service. The New York Hospital, 1932-. 



Halcie M. Boyer, PhB., R.N. 

Administrative Assistant, Night Nursing Service 

Special Certificate, Kansas State Teachers College, 1921 ; Diploma in 
Nursing, Illinois Training School for Nurses, 1928; Post-Graduate 
Course, Chicago Lying-in Hospital, 1930; PhB. The University of Chi- 
cago, 1935; Teacher, Kansas Public Schools, 1918-1924; Head Nurse, 
Woman's Surgical Ward, Cook County Hospital, 1928; General Staff 
Nurse, The University of Chicago Clinics, 1 928-1 931 ; Supervisor, Ob- 
stetrical Department and Instructor, Obstetrical Nursing, Deaconess 
Hospital, Buffalo, 1931-1932; Instructor, Obstetrical Nursing and Super- 
visor, Labor and Delivery Rooms, The New York Hospital, 1932- 1933; 
Evening Supervisor, Medical and Surgical Nursing Service, ibid., 1933- 
1935; Administrative Assistant, Night Nursing Service, The New York 
Hospital, 1 936-. 



Florence Eaton, B.A. 

Director, Payne Whitney 
Nursery School 

B.A. Colby, 191 8; Part-time Student, Columbia University, 191 8; Stu- 
dent, Longy School of Music, Boston, 1 921 -1922; Part-time Student, 
Harvard Graduate School of Education and Boston University, 1923- 
1924; Diploma, Nursery Training School of Boston, 1925; Student, 



* Arranged alphabetically. 

[37] 



Summer Session, London Academy of Music, 1931 ; Director, Cambridge 
Nursery School, 1925-1932; Assistant Director and Director, Pre-School 
Summer Camps, 1924, 1927, 1932, 1934, 1935; Assistant Director, 
Nursery Training School of Boston, Summer, 1925 ; Instructor in Music, 
ibid., 1927-1932; Children's Supervisor, Vassar Summer Institute of 
Euthenics, 1928; Director, Out-Patient Nursery School, Payne Whitney 
Clinic, The New York Hospital, 1932-1933; Director, Payne Whitney 
Nursery School, The New York Hospital, 1933-. 

S. Margaret Gillam, M.A. 

Director, Department of Nutrition 

Teacher's Diploma, Home Economics, Mechanics Institute, Rochester, 
New York, 1916; B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1922; 
M.A., ibid., 1923; Dietitian, Rochester General Hospital, 1918-1919; 
Superintendent, Woman's Industrial Home, Medical Lake, Washington, 
1919-1921 ; Director, Dietetics and Housekeeping, University of Michigan 
Hospital, 1923-1932; Instructor, Institutional Management, Teachers 
College, Columbia University, Summers 1924-1930 and 1935- ; Instructor, 
Nutrition, Department of Public Health and Hygiene, University of 
Michigan, 1925-1932; Instructor in Nutrition, Extension Division, ibid., 
1930; Director, Department of Nutrition, The New York Hospital, 
1932-. 

Verda F. Hickcox, B.S., R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing; 
Head of Obstetrical and Gynecological 
Nursing Instruction and Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School for Nurses, Chicago, 
1916; Certificate of Public Health, Chicago School of Civics and Philan- 
thropy, 1919; B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1927; 
C. M. B., General Lying-in Hospital and School of Midwifery, London, 
England, 1928; Chief Nurse, Longfellow Mining and Accident Hospital, 
Morenci, Arizona, 191 6- 191 8; General Staff Nurse, U. S. Army Base 
Hospital No. 13, France, 1918-1919; Psychiatric Social Worker, Psychi- 
atric Hospital, Dunning, Illinois, 1920; Community Nurse, American 
Red Cross, Morenci, Arizona, 1920- 1922; Private Duty, 1922- 1924; 
General Staff Nurse, University of Wisconsin Hospital, 1924-1925; Pri- 
vate Duty, 1925-1926; Supervisor, Visiting Nurse Association, York, 
Pennsylvania, 1927-1928; Instructor and Assistant to Director, Brooklyn 
Maternity Center Association, 1928; Instructor of Midwifery and Super- 
visor of Obstetrical and Gynecological Departments, Siriraj Hospital, 
Bangkok, Siam, 1 929-1 931; Consultant Nurse, Maternity, Infancy and 
Child Hygiene, New York State Department of Health, 1931-1932; As- 
sistant Director, The New York Hospital School of Nursing. 1932-; 
Head of Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing Instruction and Service, 
The New York Hospital, 1932-. 

[38] 



Hannah L. Josephi, R.N. 

Director, Social Service 

Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1 90 1 ; 
Part-time Student, New York School of Philanthropy, 1913; Part-time 
Student, New School for Social Research, 1931 ; Supervisor, Private Pa- 
tient Floor, The New York Hospital, 1901-1902; Superintendent, House 
of Holy Comforter, New York, 1902-1905; Superintendent of Hospital 
and Director, Nursing Service, Mountainside Hospital, 1907-1909; Di- 
rector, Social Service, The New York Hospital, 191 2-. 

Cora E. Kay, B.S., R.N. 

Administrative Assistant, Evening Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, St. Luke's Hospital School of Nursing, Chicago, 
1 921 ; B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1936; Instructor, 
Nursing Principles and Practice and Supervisor of Wards, Allegheny 
General Hospital, Pittsburgh, 1921-1923; Assistant Superintendent of 
Nurses, St. Luke's Hospital School of Nursing, St. Louis, 1923-1926; 
Instructor, Nursing Principles and Practice, St. Luke's Hospital School of 
Nursing, Chicago, 1926-1927; Principal, School of Nursing and Director, 
Nursing Service, Chicago Memorial Hospital, 1927-1928; Instructor, 
Nursing Principles and Practice and Second Assistant to Superintendent 
of Nurses, Clifton Springs Sanitarium and Clinic, 1929-1932; Evening 
Supervisor, Medical and Surgical Nursing Service, The New York Hos- 
pital, 1932-1937; Administrative Assistant, Evening Nursing Service, ibid., 
I937-- 

Mary T. McDermott, M.A. 

Director, Nurses' Residence ; 
Instructor, Physical Education 

Diploma, Bouve Boston School of Physical Education, 191 6; Special 
Courses, Harvard University, 191 7, 1919, 1931 ; People's College, Den- 
mark, 1926; B.S. New York University, 1930; M.A. ibid., 1932; Super- 
visor, Physical Education, Third Supervisory District, Greene County, 
N. Y., 1915-1918; Supervisor, Physical Education, City Schools, Fitch- 
burg, Massachusetts, 1918-1919; Supervisor of Playground, Concord, 
Massachusetts, 1919; Supervisor, Physical Education, City Schools, Revere, 
Massachusetts, 1919-1921 ; Supervisor of Playground, Brookline, Massa- 
chusetts, 1 92 1 ; Director, Recreation and Physical Education, Stockbridge, 
Massachusetts, 1921-1922; Director, Recreation, City of New Haven, 
1922-1924; Director, Physical Education and Health, State Teachers 
College, Fitchburg, Massachusetts, 1924- 1929; Director, Physical Edu- 
cation, Dalton Experimental School, New York, 1 9301 931 ; Assistant 
Director Student Activities, New York University, 1931-1932; Instructor, 
Physical Education, ibid., Summer, 1932; Instructor, Physical Education, 
The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932- ; Director, Nurses' 
Residence, ibid., 1932-. 

[39] 



Alice Maud Moffatt, R.N. 

Head of Private Patients' Nursing Service 

Bishop Bethune College, Oshawa, Canada, 1904-1906; Diploma in Nurs- 
ing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 19 12; Private Duty, 
1912-1915; General Staff Nurse, Hopital Militaire V. R. 76, France, 
1915-1916; Supervisor, Private Patients' Building, The New York Hos- 
pital, 1917-1932; Head of Private Patients Nursing Service, The New 
York Hospital, 1932-. 

Sarah E. Moore, R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing; 
Administrative Assistant, Day Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 191 3; 
Part-time Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, and New York 
University, 1914, 1926, 1927, 1928; Teacher, Public Schools, 1903-1908; 
Head Nurse, The New York Hospital, 1913-1918; Instructor, Practical 
Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 19 18-1922; Assist- 
ant Directress of Nurses, ibid., 1923-1932; Acting Directress of Nurses, 
ibid., 1932; Administrative Assistant, Day Nursing Service, The New 
York Hospital, 1932-. 

Bessie A. R. Parker, B.S., R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing, 
Head of Medical and Surgical Nursing 
Instruction and Services. 

Graduate Provincial Normal School, Fredericton, N. B., Canada, 1905; 
Diploma in Nursing, Rhode Island Hospital Training School for Nurses, 
Providence, 191 8; B.S. Teachers' College, Columbia University, 1937; 
Teacher, Public Schools, 1905-1915; Assistant Superintendent of Nurses 
and Instructor, Nursing Practice, Rhode Island Hospital Training School 
for Nurses, 191 8- 1920; Assistant Superintendent of Nurses and Instruc- 
tor, Nursing Practice, Bridgeport General Hospital School of Nursing, 
1 920- 1 92 1 ; Assistant Superintendent of Nurses and Instructor, Nursing 
Practice, Methodist Episcopal Hospital School of Nursing, Brooklyn. 
1921-1926; Superintendent of Nurses, ibid., 1926-1932; Administrative 
Assistant, Evening Nursing Service, The New York Hospital, 1932-1935; 
Assistant Director, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1936- ; 
Head of Medical and Surgical Nursing Instruction and Services, The 
New York Hospital, 1936-. 

Agxes Schubert, M.S., R. N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing; 
Head of Pediatric Nursing Instruction 
and Service 

B.S. Northwestern University, 1917; Diploma in Nursing, Western 
Reserve University School of Nursing, 1926; M.S. Teachers College, 

[40 1 



Columbia University, 1932; Evening Supervisor, Babies' and Children's 
Hospital, Western Reserve University, [926-1927; Assistant Instructor 
and Supervisor, ibid., 1927-1928; Assistant Director, ibid., 1928-1930; 
Supervisor and Instructor, Hobs Roberts Hospital, The University of Chi- 
cago Clinics, 1930-1931 ; Assistant Director, The New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1932-; Head of Pediatric Nursing Instruction and 
Service, The New York Hospital, 1932-. 

Carolyne A. Sprogell, B.S., R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing; 
Director, Psychiatric Nursing 

Diploma in Nursing, St. Lukes Hospital School of Nursing, New York, 
1924; Post-graduate Course, Psychiatry, Bloomingdale Hospital, 1930; 
B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1936; Head Nurse, South- 
ampton Hospital, 1924; Night Supervisor, ibid., 1925; Private Duty, 
1926; Assistant Superintendent and Instructor, Practical Nursing, South- 
ampton Hospital, 1927-1928; Supervisor, St. Lukes Hospital, New York, 
1929; Assistant Director of Nurses, Bloomingdale Hospital, 1930-1931 ; 
Acting Director of Nurses, ibid., 1931-1932; Assistant Director, The New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932- ; Director, Psychiatric Nursing, 
Payne Whitney Clinic, The New York Hospital, 1932-. 



[4ll 




CORXER IX STUDENT LOUN 




IX FICTIOX LIBRARY 



INSTRUCTORS AND SUPERVISORS * 

Sylvia Abbott, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Medical and 
Surgical Out-Patient Nursing Service 

Diploma. Washington State Normal School, 1927; Diploma in Nursing, 
Massachusetts General Hospital School of Nursing, 1931 ; Certificate in 
Public Health Nursing, Simmons College, 1938; Charge Nurse, Mary 
Imogene Bassett Hospital, Cooperstown, New York, 1931-1932; Staff 
Nurse, Community Health Association, Boston, 1932-1937; Instructor, 
Medical and Surgical Out-Patient Nursing, The New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1938- ; Supervisor, Out-Patient Nursing Service, The 
New York Hospital, 1938-. 

Dorothy E. Allison, R.N. 

Instructor and Night Supervisor, 

Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing Sen ice 

Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, Chicago, 
1932; General Staff Nurse, Obstetrical and Gynecological Service, The 
New York Hospital, 1932- 1934; Assistant Head Nurse and Head Nurse, 
ibid., 1934-1936; Private Duty, 1936-1937; Instructor, Obstetrical and 
Gynecological Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1937- ; 
Night Supervisor, Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing Service, The 
New York Hospital, 1937-. 

Persis S. Arey, R.N. 

Instructor and Night Supervisor, 
Medical and Surgical Nursing Services 

Diploma in Nursing, Rhode Island Hospital School of Nursing, 1921 ; 
Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1933-1934; Instructor, 
Nursing Principles and Practice, Rhode Island Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing, 1921-1924; Assistant Instructor, Nursing Principles and Practice, 
Indiana University Hospital School of Nursing, 1926; Supervisor, Out- 
Patient Department, Providence Lying-in Hospital, 1927-1930; Super- 
visor, Obstetrical and Gynecological Department, Strong Memorial 
Hospital, 1931-1933; Supervisor, Maternity Department, Presbyterian 
Hospital, Philadelphia, 1935; Second Assistant Superintendent of Nurses, 
Rhode Island Hospital, 1936; Instructor, Medical and Surgical Nursing, 
The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1937- ; Night Supervisor, 
Medical and Surgical Nursing Services, The New York Hospital, 1937-. 

Margaret Baxter, R.N. 

Instructor and Night Supervisor, 
Medical and Surgical Nursing Services 

Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1934; 
Part-time Student, Hunter College, 1937; General Staff Nurse and As- 
* Arranged alphabetically. 

[43] 



sistant Head Nurse, Medical Pavilions, The New York Hospital, 1934- 
1937; Instructor, Medical and Surgical Nursing, The New York Hos- 
pital School of Nursing, 1937- ; Night Supervisor, Medical and Surgical 
Nursing Service, The New York Hospital, 1937-. 

Henrietta P. Bouton, B.A., R.N. 

Instructor, Medical Social 
Service Principles and Practice 

B.A. Wellesley College, 1906; Diploma in Nursing, The New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 192 1 ; Part-time Student, Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1924, 193 1 ; Instructor, Medical Social Service Principles and 
Practice, The New York Hospital Social Service Department, 1933-. 

Helen B. Clark, R.N. 

Instructor and Night Supervisor, 
Pediatric Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Massachusetts General Hospital, 1931, Student, 
Teachers College, Columbia University, Summer 1933 and Part-time 
Student, 1936-1937; Part-time Student, Simmons College, 1934-1935; 
Head Nurse and Instructor, Pediatric Nursing, Massachusetts General 
Hospital, 1931-1935; Head Nurse and Instructor, Pediatric Nursing, 
Nassau Hospital, 1935-1936; Instructor, Pediatric Nursing, The New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, 1936- ; Night Supervisor, Pediatric 
Nursing Service, The New York Hospital, 1936-. 

Barbara Correll, B.S. 

Dietitian, Children's Clinic 

B.S. Eureka College, Eureka, Illinois, 1928; Graduate of Dietetics, St. 
Luke's Hospital, New York, 1929; Dietitian, Madison Hospital, New 
York City, 1930-1932; Dietitian, Surgical Service, The New York Hos- 
pital, 1932-1935; Dietitian, Children's Clinic and Milk Formula Room, 
ibid., 1935-. 

Eleanor M. Corrigan, R.N. 

Instructor and Administrative Assistant, 
Psychiatric Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, St. Luke's Hospital School of Nursing, New York, 
1927; Post-graduate Course in Psychiatry, Bloomingdale Hospital, 1932; 
Part-time Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1933-1937; 
Operating Room Supervisor, St. Luke's Hospital, New York, 1929-1932; 
Head Nurse, Payne Whitney Clinic, The New York Hospital, 1932- 
1935 ; Instructor, Psychiatric Nursing, The New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, 1935- ; Supervisor, Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic; The 
New York Hospital, 1935-1937; Administrative Assistant, ibid., 1937-. 

[44] 



Margaret E. Crabtree, B.S. 

Dietitian, Woman's Clinic 

B.S. University of Washington, 1932; Dietetic Certificate, King County 
Hospital, Seattle, 1933; Graduate Study, New York Hospital and Co- 
lumbia University, 1935; Dietitian, Northern State Hospital, Sedro 
Wolley, Washington, 1933-1935; Dietitian, Woman's Clinic, The New 
York Hospital, 1935-. 

Virginia Daniels, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, 
Medical Nursing Service 

Beloit College, 1923-1924; Frances Shinier Junior College, 1925-1926; 
Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, Chicago, 
1930; B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1937; General Staff 
Nurse, Presbyterian Hospital, Chicago, 1930-193 1 ; Private Duty and 
Staff Nurse, Chicago Visiting Nurse Association, 1931-1932; General 
Staff Nurse, Medical and Surgical Nursing Service, The New York Hos- 
pital. 1932-1934; Head Nurse, ibid., 1934-1936; Instructor, Medical and 
Surgical Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1936- ; 
Evening Supervisor, Medical and Surgical Nursing Service, The New 
York Hospital, 1936-1937; Instructor, Medical Nursing, The New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1937- ; Supervisor, Medical Nursing, The 
New York Hospital, 193 7-. 

Helen M. Daum, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, 
Medical Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1918; 
B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1932; Private Duty Nursing, 
1 91 8-1 929; School Nursing, Ottawa, Illinois, 1929-1930; Head Nurse, 
Medical Pavilion, The New York Hospital, 1932-1934; Instructor, Med- 
ical Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1934- ; Assistant 
Medical Supervisor, The New York Hospital, 1934-1935; Supervisor, 
Medical Nursing Service, ibid., 1935-. 

Catharine Di.mock, B.S. 

Dietitian, Nutrition Clinic 

B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1935; Student Dietitian, Food Clinic, 
Boston Dispensary, 1935-1936; Dietitian, Nutrition Clinic, The New 
York Hospital, 1936-. 

Ruth Doran, MA, R.N. 

Instructor, Public Health Nursing 
B.A. University of Illinois, 192 1 ; Diploma in Nursing, Johns Hopkins 
Hospital School for Nurses, 1924; Certificate in Midwifery, Lobenstine 
Midwifery Clinic, 1 934; M.A. Teachers College. Columbia University, 

[45] 



1938; Head Nurse and Night Supervisor, Woman's Clinic, Johns Hop- 
kins Hospital, 1924-1927; Head Nurse, Medical Ward, Albert Merritt 
Billings Hospital, 1927-1928; Instructor, Ophthalmological Nursing, Wil- 
mer Clinic, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 1929-1930; Evening Supervisor, 
Albert Merritt Billings Hospital, 1930-193 1 ; Director, Obstetrical Nurs- 
ing Service, St. Louis Maternity Hospital, 1932- 1936; Instructor, Public 
Health Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 193 7-. 

Sarah M. Ferguson, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, 
Pediatric Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Children's Hospital School of Nursing, Boston, 
1932; Part-time Student, Hunter College, 1938; General Staff Nurse, 
Assistant Head Nurse and Head Nurse, Pediatric Nursing Service, The 
New York Hospital, 1932-1937; Instructor, Pediatric Nursing, The New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, 1937- ; Supervisor, Pediatric Nursing 
Service, The New York Hospital, 1937-. 

Laura Wood Fitzsimmons, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, 
Psychiatric Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, The Army School of Nursing, 1926; Part-time 
Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1933-1938; Head Nurse, 
Walter Reed Hospital, 1926- 1929; Supervisor, Psychiatric Department, 
Gallinger Hospital, 1928-1933; Instructor, Psychiatric Nursing, The New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, 1933- ; Assistant Night Supervisor, 
Payne Whitney Clinic, The New York Hospital, 1933; Night Supervisor, 
ibid., 1934-1937; Day Supervisor, ibid., 1937-. 

Elin Friberg, R.N. 

Instructor and Assistant Night Supervisor, 
Psychiatric Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Long Island College Hospital, 1932; Post-Graduate 
Course in Psychiatry, Bloomingdale Hospital, 1932-1933; Part-time Stu- 
dent, Teacher's College, Columbia University and Hunter College, 1934- 
1938; General Staff Nurse, Payne Whitney Clinic, The New York Hos- 
pital, 1933-1934; Assistant Head Nurse, ibid., 1934-1935; Instructor, 
Psychiatric Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1935- ; 
Assistant Night Supervisor, Payne Whitney Clinic, The New York Hos- 
pital, 1935-. 

E. Elizabeth Geiger, R.N. 

Instructor New Born Care and Supervisor of 
Nurseries, Obstetrical Nursing Service. 
Student, Illinois Woman's College, 1919-1921 ; Diploma in Nursing, Wes- 
ley Memorial Hospital School of Nursing, 1924; Part-time Student, 

[46] 



University of Chicago, 1934-1936; Supervisor, Pediatric Department, 
Wesley Memorial Hospital, 1925-1927; Supervisor, Out Patient Depart- 
ment, Northwestern University Medical School, 1927-1933; Head Nurse, 
Pediatric Nursing Service, The New York Hospital, 1933; Supervisor, 
ibid., 1 933- 1934; Supervisor, Staff Health Service and Director, Social 
Activities, Children's Memorial Hospital, Chicago, 1934-1936; Instructor, 
New Horn Care, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1936- ; 
Supervisor of Nurseries, Obstetrical Nursing Service, The New York 
Hospital, 1 936-. 

Catherine P. Geuss, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, 

Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing Service 

Diploma in Teaching, Northeast Missouri Teachers College, 1924; 
Diploma in Nursing, Michael Reese Hospital School of Nursing, 1928; 
Diploma, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Woman's Hospital, New York, 
1929; Student, University of Chicago, 1930; B.S. and Diploma in Super- 
vision, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1932; Teacher, 1919- 
1924; Head Nurse and Instructor, Obstetrical Nursing, Michael Reese 
Hospital, 1929-1930; Supervisor, Surgical Wards, ibid., 1930-1931; 
Instructor, Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing, The New York Hos- 
pital School of Nursing, 1932-; Assistant Supervisor, Obstetrical and 
Gynecological Nursing Service, The New York Hospital, 1932-1935; 
Supervisor, ibid., 1935-. 

Margaret F. Grainger, B.A., R.N. 

Instructor and Surgical Supervisor, 
Surgical and Urological Nursing Service 

B.A. Butler University, 1927; Diploma in Nursing, Johns Hopkins 
Hospital School for Nurses, 1930; Head Nurse, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 
1930-193 1 ; Assistant Director, Practical Nursing, Johns Hopkins Hos- 
pital School for Nurses, 1931-1934; Assistant Superintendent of Nurses, 
Johns Hopkins Hospital, 1934-1935; Instructor, Surgical and Urological 
Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1935- ; Supervisor, 
Surgical and Urological Nursing Service, The New York Hospital, 1935-. 

Elizabeth Harmon, B.A., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor. 
Surgical Nursing Service 

B.A. College of Wooster, 1928; Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hos- 
pital School of Nursing, Chicago, 1931 ; General Staff Nurse, Presbyterian 
Hospital, Chicago, 1931-1932; General Staff Nurse, The New York Hos- 
pital, 1932-1934; Head Nurse, ibid., 1934-1937; Instructor, Medical and 
Surgical Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1937; 
Night Supervisor, Medical and Surgical Nursing Service, The New York 
Hospital, 1937-1938; Instructor, Surgical Nursing, The New York 

[47] 



Hospital School of Nursing, 1938- ; Supervisor, Surgical Nursing Service, 
The New York Hospital, 1938-. 

Thirza L. Hills, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor 
Surgical Nursing Service 

University of Illinois, 1916-1918; Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hos- 
pital School for Nurses, Chicago, 1925; Student, University of Chicago, 
Summer, 1927; Course in Public Health Nursing, Henry Street Settle- 
ment, two months, 1936; Part-time Student, Teachers' College, Colum- 
bia University, 1937-1938; Staff nurse, Presbyterian Hospital, Chicago, 
1925-1926; Assistant Night Supervisor, ibid., 1926-1927; Instructor, 
Surgical Procedures, ibid., 1928-1929; Head Nurse, ibid., 1929-1932; 
Head Nurse, Obstetrical Service and Surgical Service, The New York 
Hospital, 1932-1935; Instructor, Surgical Nursing, The New York Hos- 
pital School of Nursing, 1935- ; Supervisor, Surgical Nursing Service, The 
New York Hospital, 1935-. 

Dorothy Hobart, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, 
Private Patient Nursing Service 

B.S. Denison University, 1925; Diploma in Nursing, The New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1933; Part-time Student, Teachers College, 
Columbia University, Fall 1928, 1934, 1937; Teacher, 1925-1930; Gen- 
eral Staff Nurse, Private Patient Service, The New York Hospital, 1933- 
1934; Head Nurse, Semi-Private Floor, ibid., 1934-1937; Instructor, Pri- 
vate Patient Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1937- ; 
Supervisor, Private Patient Nursing Service, The New York Hospital, 
I937-- 

M ARGARET JdNVILLE, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, 
Psychiatric Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, The Army School of Nursing, 1929; Part-time Stu- 
dent, Hunter College and Teacher's College, Columbia University, 1933- 
1938; Private Duty, 1929-1931 ; Assistant Head Nurse, Bloomingdale 
Hospital, 1931-1932; Head Nurse, Payne Whitney Clinic, The New York 
Hospital, 1932-1936; Instructor, Psychiatric Nursing, The New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1936- ; Supervisor, Payne Whitney Clinic, 
The New York Hospital, 1936-. 

Caroline Keller, B.A., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Surgical 
Nursing Service 

B.A. Smith College, 1921 ; Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital 
School of Nursing, New York, 1929; Instructor, Miss Day's School, 

[48] 



New Haven, 1921-1924; Instructor, The Holman School, Philadelphia, 
1924-1925; Head Nurse, Surgical Ward, New Haven Hospital, 1929- 
1930; Assistant Supervisor, Surgical Nursing, New Haven Hospital, 
1930-1932; Instructor, Surgical Nursing, The New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, 1932- ; Supervisor, Surgical Nursing Service, The New York 
Hospital, 1932-. 



Mary Elizabeth Klein, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Obstetrical 
and Gynecological Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Hahnemann Hospital School of Nursing, 191 6; 
B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1936; Supervisor, Private 
Hospital, Guayaquil, Ecuador, 1917-1918; Private Duty, 1918-1921 ; 
Supervisor, Private Floors, Hahnemann Hospital, 1921-1925; Supervisor, 
Operating Rooms, ibid., 1925-1928; Head Nurse, Maternity Hospital, 
Western Reserve University, 1929-1930; Supervisor and Assistant In- 
structor, ibid., 1930-1932; Instructor, Obstetrical and Gynecological Nurs- 
ing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; Supervisor, Ob- 
stetrical and Gynecological Nursing Service, The New York Hospital, 
I932-. 



Mary Kyer, R.N. 

Instructor, Operative Technique and Practice ; 
Assistant Supervisor, General Operating Rooms 

Diploma in Nursing, Samaritan Hospital School of Nursing, Troy, New 
York, 1932; General Staff Nurse, Samaritan Hospital, 1932-1933; Gen- 
eral Staff Nurse and Head Nurse, Operating Rooms, The New York 
Hospital, 1933-1937; Instructor, Operative Technique and Practice, The 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1937- ; Assistant Supervisor, Gen- 
eral Operating Rooms, The New York Hospital, 193 7-. 

Marie A. Lalime. R.N. 

Instructor and Evening Supervisor, 
Medical and Surgical Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Misericordia Hospital School of Nursing, 1926; 
Part-time Student, Teacher's College, Fordham University, 1933-1934; 
Head Nurse, Male Surgery, Misericordia Hospital, 1926-1927; Private 
Duty, 1927-1928; Supervisor in Obstetrics, Misericordia Hospital, 1928- 
1935; Private Duty, 1935-1936; General Staff Nurse, The New York 
Hospital, 1936-1937; Evening Head Nurse, Emergencv Pavilion, ibid., 
1937-1938; Instructor, Medical and Surgical Nursing, 'The New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1938- ; Evening Supervisor, Medical and 
Surgical Service, The New York Hospital, 1938-. 

[49] 



Eleanor Lewis, B.A., B.N., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Psychiatric 
Out-Patient Nursing Service 

B.A. Radcliffe College, 1925; B.N. Yale University School of Nursing, 
1928; Nurse in Charge, Urological Clinic, New Haven Hospital, 1928- 
1929; Psychiatric Nursing, Four Winds Sanatorium, Katonah, New York, 
1929-1932; Assistant Head Nurse, Children's Service, Payne Whitney 
Clinic, The New York Hospital, 1932-1933; Staff Nurse, ibid., 1933- 
1934; Staff Nurse, Brooklyn Visiting Nurse Association, 1934-1935 ; In- 
structor, Psychiatric Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 
1935- ; Supervisor, Psychiatric Out-Patient Nursing Service, Payne Whit- 
ney Clinic, The New York Hospital, 1935-. 

Veronica Lyons, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor, Operative Technique and 
Practice; Supervisor, General 
Operating Rooms. 

Cornell University, 1921-1922; Diploma in Nursing, Johns Hopkins Hos- 
pital School for Nurses, 1927; B.S. Teachers College, Columbia Univer- 
sity, 1936; Head Nurse, Gynecological Ward, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 
1927-1928; Head Nurse, Surgical and Gynecological Ward, Binghamton 
City Hospital, 1928-1929; Suture Nurse, Operating Room, Moore- 
Overton Hospital, Binghamton, 1929; Office Assistant, Eye, Ear, Nose 
and Throat Surgeon, 1 929-1 931 ; Instructor, Nursing Principles and 
Practice, Montefiore Hospital School of Nursing, 1931-1932; Head Nurse, 
Woman's Clinic, The New York Hospital, 1932-1935; Assistant to Di- 
rector of Nurses, New Rochelle Hospital, 1936-1937 ; Instructor. Opera- 
tive Technique and Practice, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 
1937- ; Supervisor, General Operating Rooms, The New York Hospital, 
I937-. 

Lucy J. Macdonald, R.N. 

Supervisor, Private Operating Room 

Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1927; 
Part-time Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1927; Head 
Nurse, Surgical Ward, The New York Hospital, 1927; Suture Nurse, 
Public Operating Room, ibid., 1 928-1 931 ; Supervisor, Private Operating 
Room, ibid., 1932; Head Nurse, Emergency Pavilion, ibid., 1932-1933; 
Supervisor, Private Operating Room, ibid., 1934-. 

Ethel Oatman, R.N. 

Instructor and Night Supervisor, 
Psychiatric Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Butler Hospital School of Nursing, 1929; Part-time 
Student, Brown University, 1 929-1930; Part-time Student, Syracuse Uni- 

[50] 



versity, 1935-1936; Part-time Student, Hunter College, 1937-1938; As- 
sistant Head Nurse and Head Nurse, Butler Hospital, 1929-1930; Pri- 
vate Duty, 1 93 1 ; General Staff Nurse, Syracuse Memorial Hospital, I93 2 " 
[936; Head Nurse, Payne Whitney Clinic, The New York Hospital, 
[936; Instructor, Psychiatric Nursing, The New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, 1937- ; ^i£ nt Supervisor, Payne Whitney Clinic, The New 
York Hospital, 1937-. 

Madeleine O'Brien, R.N. 

Evening Supervisor, 

Private Patient Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1924; 

Charge Nurse, Men's Medical Pavilion, The New York Hospital, 1925 ; 

Private Nursing, 1926-1937; Evening Supervisor, Private Patient Nurs- 
ing Service, The New York Hospital, 1937-. 

Mabel W. Perry, B.S. 

Dietitian, Nutrition Clinic 

B.S. Battle Creek College, 1933; Dietetic Certificate, Montefiore Hospi- 
tal, 1934; Dietitian, Food Clinic, Boston Dispensary, 1934; Associate 
Dietitian, Food Clinic, Beth Israel Hospital, Boston, 1935; Research Die- 
titian, Diagnostic Hospital, New England Medical Center, Boston, 1935- 
1936; Dietitian, Burrough's Newsboys Foundation Health Education De- 
partment, Boston, 1934-1936; Dietitian, Nutrition Clinic, The New York 
Hospital, 1936-. 

Edna E. Royle, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, 
Pediatric Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia School of 
Nursing, 1931 ; Summer School and Part-time Student, University of 
Pennsylvania, 1934, 1937; Part-time Student, Teachers College, Columbia 
University, 1938; Head Nurse and Instructor, Milk Laboratory, Chil- 
dren's Hospital of Philadelphia, 1931 ; Assistant Educational Director, 
ibid., I93I-I937; Instructor, Pediatric Nursing, The New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1937- ; Supervisor, Pediatric Nursing Service, The 
New York Hospital, 193 7-. 

Henderika J. Rynbergen, M.S. 

Instructor, Nutrition 

B.S. Simmons College, 1922; M.S. Cornell University Medical College. 
1938; Nutrition Worker Neighborhood Kitchen, Boston, 1922-1924; Food 
Clinic Dietitian, Washington University Dispensary, Barnes and Allied 
Hospitals, St. Louis, 1924-1926; Head Dietitian, Sea View Hospital, New 
York, 1927; Ward Dietitian, Presbyterian Hospital, New York, 1927- 
1928; Food Clinic Dietitian, Vanderbilt Clinic, ibid., 1928-1929; Dieti- 

[51] 



tian, American University Hospital, Beirut, Syria, 1929-1934; Instructor 
in Nutrition, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1934-1938; 
Instructor of Chemistry, Physiology and Nutrition, ibid., 1938-. 

Mildred N. Stone, R.N. 

Instructor and Evening Supervisor, 
Pediatric Nursing Service 

Student, University of Vermont, 1928- 1929; Diploma in Nursing, The 
Children's Hospital School of Nursing, Boston, 1932; Part-time Student, 
Teachers College, Columbia University, 1936- 1938; General Staff 
Nurse, Assistant Head Nurse and Head Nurse, Pediatric Service, The 
New York Hospital, 1932-1935; Evening Supervisor, ibid., 1935-1936; 
Head Nurse, ibid., 1936-1937; Instructor, Pediatric Nursing, The New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, 1937- ; Evening Supervisor, Pediatric 
Nursing Service, The New York Hospital, 1937-. 

Jeanette Walters, R.N. 

Instructor and Evening Supervisor, Obstetrical 
and Gynecological Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Temple University Hospital School of Nursing, 
1923; Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, Summer 1924, 
Part-time Student, ibid., 1933, 1934, J 935 J Part-time Student, New York 
University, 1937-1938; Post-Graduate Course, Obstetrics, Woman's Hos- 
pital, New York, 1932; Supervisor, Medical and Surgical Ward, Temple 
University Hospital, 1924-1925; Supervisor, Babies' Hospital, Philadel- 
phia, 1926-1928; Assistant Superintendent, Columbia Hospital, 1928-1929; 
Supervisor, Obstetrical Department, Temple University Hospital, 1930; 
Instructor, Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing, The New York Hos- 
pital School of Nursing, 1932- ; Evening Supervisor, Obstetrical and Gyne- 
cological Nursing Service, The New York Hospital, 1932-. 

Margaret Wyatt, B.A., R.N. 

Instructor, Nursing Arts 

B.A. Meredith College, 1923; Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hos- 
pital School of Nursing, 1927; Student, Teachers College, Columbia 
University, Summers 1931-1935; Instructor and Assistant to the Dean of 
Women, Meredith College, 1923-1924; Head Nurse, Surgical Ward, The 
New York Hospital, 1 927-1930; Instructor, Nursing Arts, The New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, 1930-. 



[52] 



HEAD NURSES AND CHARGE NURSES 
ASSISTANT INSTRUCTORS 

Medical and Surgical Services 

Marjorie Arehart, R.N. Eleanor Greenwat, R.N. 

Margaret Bissell, R.N. Ruth McLellan, R.N. 

Mrs. Margit J. Brandt, R.N. Dorothy E. Meyer, R.N. 

Mrs. Ruth G. Brockman, R.N. Frances A. Morrison, R.N. 

Olga Chernek, R.N. Ruth Roberts, R.N. 

Fern E. Christensen, R.N. Emily Rogers, B.A., R.N. 

Virginia Cockes, R.N. Charlotte Sowers, R. N. 

Barbara Derr, R.N. Sylvia C. Stearin, R.N. 

Isobel Donnelly, R.N. Charlotte Steuer, R.N. 

Mrs. Edna L. Eckel, R.N. Eva V. Steinburg, R.N. 
Katherine Zorn, R.N. 

Out-Patient Service 

Mrs. Anne Beard, R.N. Mrs. Vivian B. Hyer, R.N. 

Evelyn S. Clark, R.N. Lucile M. Lambert, R.N. 

Alcida H. Coulter, R.N. Evelyn Liddle, R.N. 

Irene Curley, R.N. Pauline M. Murphy, R.N. 

Mrs. Katherine Drucklieb, R.N. Mrs. Elsa Nussbaumer, R.N. 

Elsie M. Fiege, R.N. Mrs. Celia Pehr, R.N. 
Margaret Rouchleau, R.N. 

Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic 

Stella Copley, R.N. Mary Kutz, R.N. 

Samuel Cloud, R.N. Lenora MacKay, R.N. 

Inez Gnau, R.N. Mrs. Blanche Skerky, R.N. 

Martin Grothe, R.N. Jessie Weaver, R.N. 

Beatrice Healy, R.N. Arlene Wilson, R.N. 

Enid Kircaldie, R.N. Orpha Wood, R.N. 

Pediatric Service 

Norvveen K. Fisher, R.N. Della Meachard, R.N. 

Margaret Kelly, R.N. Margaret Schaub, R.N. 

Ruth E. Woodfall, R.N. 

Private and Semi-Private Services 

Elizabeth Bickford, B.A., R.N. L. Marguerite McGrath, R.N. 

Alma Blenkin. R.N. Philomene M. Marshall, R.N. 

Alice Burlin, R.N. Sylvia Otterbein, R.N. 

Mrs. Marie B. Clarke, R.N. Jeanette Stone, R.N. 

Mildred Harrington, R.N. Myrna E. Wight, R.N. 

Mrs. Geraldine H. Harris, R.N. Helen Yesulaitis, R.N. 

Woman's Clinic 

Henrietta Eppink, R.N. Eda E. Hoewtscher, R.N. 

Dorothy S. Fisher, R.N. Mildred A. Jensen, R.N. 

Edith Gaeckle, R.N. Veronica Matus, R.N. 

Beulah M. Hartmax, R.N. Emily Mugford, R.N. 

Wii.ma C. Hawkinson. R.N. Edith Nielsen, R.N. 

Virginia G. Henry, R.N. Rose Valpreda, R.N. 
Ruth B. Wilson, R.N 



[53] 



ASSISTANT HEAD NURSES 
DAY AND NIGHT SERVICES 



Medical and Surgical Services 



Grace Coates, R.N. 
Martha Jane Demy, R.X. 
Beulah E. Detrick, R.N. 
Antoinette T. Fedoroutcz, 

H. ESTELLE FOLLIS, R.N. 

Cecelia Goral, R.N. 
Charlotte R. Gravvn, R.N. 
Mary Haver, B.A., R.N. 
Jessica Harsen, R.N. 
Marion Hartman, R.N. 
Josephine Hummel, R.N. 
Ruth Johnston, R.N. 



R.N. 



Elizabeth T. Jones, R.N. 
Evelyn S. Linton, R.N. 
Ruth Pauline Loucks, R.N. 
Helen E. McLeod, R.N. 
Margaret R. Mullens, R.N. 
Lillian A. Myers, R.N. 
Marion Pilling, R.N. 
Elizabeth H. Ray, B.A., R.N. 
Catherine F. Ross, R.N. 
Mrs. Eunice D. Volpe, R.N. 
Hazel Mary Wicks, R.N. 
A. Dean Wilbur, R.N. 



Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic 

Mary Goforth, R.N. James MacLeod, R.N. 

Elizabeth Hilliard, R.N. Albert Payson, R.N. 

Mary Jenkins, R.N. Mrs. Margaret Rathbone, 

Grace Lundgren, R.N. Dorothy Welborn, R.N. 



R.N, 



Helen Gertz. R.N. 



Pediatric Service 

Agnes Rieman, 
Jane Van Dement, R.N. 



R.N. 



Private and Semi-Private Services 



Jean E. Blampied, R.N. 
Helen Brachiere, R.N. 
Agnes G. Damaska, R.N. 
Mildred Deater, R.N. 
Jennie F. Ervine, R.N. 
Meredith E. Keller, R.N. 



Janet Augusta Mack, R.N. 
Catherine M. Moran, R.N. 
Veronica Morris, R.N. 
Georgina Schneider, R.N. 
Mrs. Virginia S. Sweeney, R.N. 
Lois Mary Tait, R.N. 



Bernice Thompson, R.N, 



A 



Martha C. Ailes, R.N. 
Margaret L. Benson, R.N. 
Selma F. Buchdahl, R.N. 
Mrs. Florence Campbell, R 
Marciana Cortes, R.N. 
Elizabeth J. Hazen, R.N. 
Grace Dorothy Kingsley, R.N. 

Louise Woerm 



If Oman's Clinic 

Mary C. Littler, R.N. 
Virginia F. Masters, R.N. 
Maude Metzger, R.N. 
Ferne M. Parent, R.N. 
Pearl E. Trombly, R.N. 
Mrs. Marjorie Tyner, R.N. 
Loretta Ellen Wright, R.N. 
ke. R.N. 



STUDENT AND STAFF HEALTH 



Marian Tyndall, M.D Physician-in-Charge 

Mildred Evans, M.D. Consultant Psychiatrist 

Elsie Davies, R.N Supervisor, Infirmary 

[54] 



ASSISTANTS IN ADMINISTRATION 

Flora Josephine Bergstrom, R.X Librarian 

ELLA BULLEN, B.A Secretary 

Helen- Cleary Secretary 

Dorothy Jacobus, B.A Secretary-Registrar 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY MEDICAL COLLEGE FACULTY 
AND OTHERS PARTICIPATING IN INSTRUCTION* 



Ralph G. Stillman, M.D. . 
Ruth Thomas, A.B., C.P.H. . 
George W. Wheeler, M.D. . 
Chester Loomis Yntema, Ph.D. 



Assistant Professor of Clinical Pathology 

Instructor, Applied Bacteriology 

Assistant Professor of Bacteriology 

Assistant Professor of Anatomv 



Eugene F. DuBois, M.D., and Staff . 

OSKAR DlETHELM, M.D., AND STAFF . 

George S. Heuer, M.D., and Staff . 
Samuel Z. Levine, M.D., and Staff . 
Henricus J. Stander, M.D., and Staff 



Professor of Medicine 

Professor of Psychiatry 

Professor of Surgery 

Professor of Pediatrics 

Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology 



Fannie Bradshaw Director, Theatre Studio 

Camille Gaute Instructor of Massage 

R. C. Redden, M.D Director, First Aid, American Red Cross 

Mary T. Whitley, Ph.D 

Professor of Psychology, Teachers College, Columbia University 



MEMBERS OF AFFILIATING ORGANIZATIONS 



Hazel Corbin, R. N 

General Director 

Katharine Favell, M.A.. R.X. 

General Director of Nursing 



Maternitv Center Association 



Visiting Nurse Service, 
Henrv Street Settlement 



Arranged alphabetically 



[55] 



1 




ON THE WAY TO HOSPITAL 



w 




IPngs YOU 

WANT TO KNOW ABOUT 
THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 



THIS is New York's first hospital, and the second oldest 
in America. It was chartered in 1771, during the reign 
of George III, and the original building was erected 
during the stirring days leading up to the Revolutionary 
War. The first patients were Continentals who were 
injured in 1776 while defending the Hospital property 
in lower New York from an attack by British warships. 
Ever since, in times of peace, war and pestilence, we have 
done whatever we could to serve our community and our 
country. 

Ours is a voluntary hospital— supported by voluntary 
contributions instead of by taxes. This has been true from 
the start. While grants of money were made in past emer- 
gencies by Colonial, State and City governments, the 
Hospital as it stands today is a monument to the foresight 
of seven generations of public-spirited individuals who 
have given generously for its support. 

Ours has always been a teaching hospital. This was 







FINANCIAL SIDE 



Last year The New York Hospital spent $3,742,892.59 
directly in behalf of patients. 

We received for their care only $2,624,108.65. 

The balance, $1,118,783.94, represents care given to 
patients who could not pay their entire hospital expenses, 
if anything at all. 

Part of this loss was met by friends of the hospital ; 
part was covered by income from endowment funds 
donated in previous years; part, unfortunately, had to 
be withdrawn from capital funds, thus depleting the 
source of future income. 

To avoid a similar situation this year, we must receive 
renewals of former gifts, and $250,000 from new friends. 

But that is only part of the story. It does not provide 
for growth, nor for operating to capacity. We are fortu- 
nate in having unexcelled facilities— we owe it to our 
community to make these facilities available to the utmost. 

Now whole pavilions are forlorn and empty while 
worthy applicants are being turned away from our ad- 
mitting office ; we ought to open a surgery floor for chil- 
dren; more adequate funds for research might reveal the 
causes and necessary treatment for diseases as yet uncon- 
trolled and taking their tragic toll. 

One dollar, ten dollars, ten thousand dollars, or even 
more— your contribution is needed, and will do its propor- 
tionate share toward caring for sick people who just can- 
not manage the entire hospital bill themselves. 




E'S something in 
the air at The New York Hospital, " many a patient has 
said— "something I can't quite describe, but"— and then 
they go on to say such things as : 

"It almost pays to get sick to know that there is so 
much kindness in the world." 

"It's an institution that is not institutional. It has a 
heart and soul." 

"I felt as though I were the only patient in the hospital." 

This "something in the air" which is felt by the visitor 
as well as by the patient is, we believe, more significant 
than the tangible things that make The New York Hos- 
pital one of the largest medical centers in the world. The 
friendly solicitous doorman expresses it; the tireless 
interne who tiptoes around after lights-out to see that all 
his charges are comfortable ; the crisp smiling nurse who 
knows just how to place a little extra pillow to ease the 
pain; the doctor, serene and kindly, with his reassuring 
lore of experience; the porter who quietly and unobtru- 
sively produces spotless cleanliness without disturbing 
anyone— and over two thousand other employees of the 
Hospital, all chosen not only for their technical skill, but 
also for their willingness to put the well-being of the 
patient above all else. 

The "something in the air," as near as we can discover, 
is the composite personality of our staff of 2,050, all 
pledged to unselfish service. They are, in reality, this hos- 
pital. 



The patient sees only a few of them, but he does have 
proof of their activity. The smooth fresh bed linens, the 
daintily arranged trays, individually prepared to suit each 
patient— these are just two of the many evidences of what 
goes on behind the scenes in the laundries, kitchens, and 
power-house 24 hours a day, every day in the week. 

We are big, but our bigness is just a means to an end. 
We have over six miles of corridors, hundreds of rooms, 
dozens of laboratories, kitchens and operating rooms, facil- 
ities for treating every sort of illness. We have a quantity 
and variety of equipment which are beyond the means of 
most smaller hospitals. But these things are here for just 
one purpose— so that each patient may have just what is 
best for him. 

To determine that, we have so many house doctors, 
staff doctors, nurses, laboratory technicians and dietitians, 
that we can have among them specialists in each field- 
specialists who confer amongst themselves and contribute 
the best of their composite knowledge, experience and skill 
to meet the challenge which each individual patient's case 
makes to them. 

To our patients we wish a speedy recovery and ask that 
they let us know if they think we can serve them better. 

To our visitors we extend a warm welcome. We hope 
that their visit will result in continued interest in what 
we are trying to do at The New York Hospital to pre- 
serve our long tradition of service, and at the same time to 
forge ahead to even wider fields of usefulness. 




After two weeks of just 
the right diet, Susan dis- 
covered for the first time 
in the 18 months of her 
little invalid life that a 
world full of bunnies and 
doctors and nurses is a 
very amusing place in 
which to be. 



tP 



Good books and a dis- 
criminating librarian to 
recommend just the right 
one, do much to shorten o 
long siege in the hospital. 



17' 


i 










i . / 


i f 





€Z 



?\ mi 



insisted upon by our founders. For the past 25 years, our 
chief educational affiliation has been with Cornell Uni- 
versity Medical College, whose buildings are part of the 
present hospital group. Start doctors of the Hospital are 
professors in the College, and students obtain their prac- 
tical instruction in the Hospital. 

The New York Hospital also maintains an exception- 
ally fine school of nursing, founded in 1877. 

During its 166 years, the Hospital has occupied only 
three sites. The present group of buildings here on the 
East River was opened in 1932. It provides 1,053 beds, 
and includes a general hospital, an obstetrical and gyneco- 
logical hospital, a children's building, and a psychiatry 
hospital. This is affiliated through the Society of The 
New York Hospital with the Westchester Division Hos- 
pital, founded in 1821 as Bloomingdale, and maintained 
by the Society since that time. 



Last year 3,390 babies were born in the Hospital. 
19,962 patients received 366,558 days treatment. 
40,016 patients made 270,950 visits to the Out-Patient 
Department— an average of almost a thousand a day. 
6,814 operations were performed. 

12,883 emergency cases were treated in the accident ward. 
126,926 laboratory examinations were made. 
1,969,363 meals were served. 

But the story cannot be told in mere figures. Impres- 
sively large as they are, the real story of The New York 
Hospital is the story of the individual patient who goes 
home the better for his stay with us and who writes back 
to us that "there's something in the air" at The New 
York Hospital. 



OUR BOARD OF GOVERNORS 



Henry G. Barbey, President 
Barklie Henry, Vice-President 
Bronson Winthrop, Treasurer 
Augustine J. Smith, Secretary 



W. Vincent Astor 
Cornelius N. Bliss 
George T. Bowdoin 
F. Higginson Cabot, Jr. 
Joseph H. Choate, Jr. 
Henry W. de Forest 
Livingston Farrand,M.D. 
R. Horace Gallatin 
Arthur Iselin 

William 



G. Beekman Hoppin 
Langdon P. Marvin 
Williamson Pell 
Paul G. Pennoyer 
Frank L. Polk 
Henry S. Sturgis 
Paul Tuckerman 
John Hay Whitney 
Robert Winthrop 
Woodward 



The Society of The New York Hospital 

525 East 68th Street 

New York, N. Y. 



PLEASE MAKE CONTRIBUTION CHECKS TO 
■RONSON WINTHROP, TREASURER 




* * .*v 



%r 




t costs The New York Hospital, 
roughly, four million dollars a year 
to care for its patients. They pay 
all they possibly can, which aver- 
ages only three-fourths. Some cannot pay at all. 

It costs about $100 to care for each mother 
and her new-born baby in The Lying-in 
Hospital. 

Income from patients, a grant from the 
United Hospital Fund, and interest on in- 
vested funds, all help, but still leave approxi- 
mately $300,000 to be raised in annual con- 
tributions. 

The New York Hospital, a voluntary hos- 
pital, does not operate for profit, nor is it a 
municipal hospital. 

To make its facilities available to the sick 
poor who are its responsibility, it is there- 
fore asking special gifts now — because it's 
Christmas. 



— because !!i 




tjrtetma* 




ecause it's Christmas we think 
again of the Baby born in a manger 
long ago — the Baby who started 
Christmas. 

And perhaps we remember that other 
babies will be born this year on the birthday 
of the Child of Bethlehem. 

Over a hundred mothers will be in The 
Lying-in Hospital on Christmas Day. 

Every day is a birthday here; but on Christ- 
mas, mothers like to think that their babies 
are born with a special destiny. 

Instead of being in a lowly manger, they 
are in a safe modern maternity hospital. Many 
of them are in need. 

Perhaps there is still a guiding star for those 
who would bring gifts— because it's Christmas. 



— because 



*M£^*t 






m 





grfetmas; 



•JH9A vpvz puEsnoq} jnoj jsao— Am 
3t[5 ui p^idsoq jaqio Aue unq} saiq^q uaoq-Avau 
pu^ saaqioui djoui joj saio uj-SuxAq aqjL 
•ifjiiqpjiip ui AlajES jo }U3iudopA3p aqi ui 

3J^d p?UA E paAiqd sAEA\p> SEq 3T pUE [S^SJTIU 

puB sicxpop en SDurpisqo ui Suiuiexi \bd\-\ 
ood Suuajjo ui paiaauoid uj-SuiAq aqj^ 

•pejidsoH T[io\ M3^ aqj^ qiiM psjciujg 
ApuauEimad auioaq 5i piun ^uapuadapui 
seai it Aamu93 12 J9AO joj usqjL ABAipEOjg 
i9Avo| uo Suippnq peiidsoj^ ^°A ^M l BU ! 
-Si jo aqi ui pasnoq seai 31 sjnaA 5s jsao joj 

•uo5ui|3 }}iM 9Q P UH ucrqiuiEi-j 

J9pU^X3|Y SuiptipUI 'SU^ZUp :}U3JOA9U9q 

uioij suopduDsqns Aq ajqissod sp^ui sem 3j 

seay uoiSuiqsEyw 9§jo9q ^pqA^ 66 L i 
ui pauado sem— uj-SuiAq pjo 9qi— 
n^idsojq Aiiuj9^jaj isaij s/>raoA A\a 




— because ,'t! 





'fjrtetma* 



Governors of 
The Society of The New York Hospital 

525 EAST SIXTY-EIGHTH STREET, NEW YORK 
also Westchester Division, White Plains 



Vincent Astor 
Cornelius N. Bliss 
George T. Bowdoin 
W. Gibson Carey, Jr. 
Joseph H. Choate, Jr. 
Walter G. Dunnington 
R. Horace Gallatin 
Barklie Henry, President 
G. Bfekman Hoppin 
Arthur Iselin 
William Harding Jackson, 
Vice-President 



Langdon P. Marvin- 
Williamson Pell 
Paul G. Pennoyer 
Frank L. Polk 
Augustine J. Smith, Secretary 
Henry S. Sturgis, Treasurer 
Lanoon K. Thorne 
Paul Tuckerman 
John Hay Whitney 
Bronson Winthrop 
Robert Winthrop 
William Woodward 




Suggested Bequest Form 

"I give and bequeath to 

The Society of The New York Hospital 

the sum of dollars." 



THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 




Chartered 1771 



ANNOUNCEMENT 
1939-1940 

VOLUME VIII NUMBER I 



If after reading this bulletin there are 
further questions, please write to the Director 
of the School of Nursing. An application will 
be sent upon request if an applicant is able 
to satisfy the entrance requirements. 




THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL, SOUTH VIEW 



THE SOCIETY OF THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 

THE 

NEW YORK HOSPITAL 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Associated with Cornell University 




Announcement 

1939 • J 94° 



Volume viii 



Number i 



CALENDAR 



1939 
September 30 .... Matriculation and Registration (First 

year students) 

October 2 Winter Term begins — Classes convene 

October 12 Columbus Day (Not a holiday for first 

year students) 
November 30) .... Thanksgiving Recess (First year stu- 
December 3 ( dents) 

November 30 .... Thanksgiving Day — A holiday 
December 24) ... . Christmas Vacation (First year stu- 
January 2 ( dents) 

December 25 Christmas Day — A holiday 

1940 

January 1 New Year's Day — A holiday 

January 3 Classes convene 

January 21 Winter Term ends 

January 22 Spring Term begins — Classes convene 

February 12 Lincoln's Birthday — A holiday 

February 22 Washington's Birthday — A holidav 

May 12 Spring Term ends 

May 13 Summer Term begins — Classes convene 

May 30 Memorial Day — A holiday 

July 4 Independence Day — A holiday 

September 4 Labor Day — A holiday 

September 28 .... Matriculation and Registration (First 

year students) 
September 29 .... Summer Term ends 

(Four weeks' vacation and three weeks' vacation 
within the summer term for second and first year 
students respectively; two weeks' vacation for 
third year students during psychiatric assignment.) 

September 30 .... Winter Term begins — Classes convene 

No classes will be held on the above noted holidays. 



[ 5 ] 




LOBBY OF NURSES RESIDENCE 



GENERAL STATEMENT 



History 



THE New York Hospital, the second oldest hospital in 
America, maintained by private endowment, received its 
charter of incorporation under George the Third of England on 
the thirteenth day of June, 177 1, under the title of the Society 
of the Hospital in the City of New York in America. Subse- 
quently by an Act of the Legislature in 18 10 the title was 
changed to The Society of The New York Hospital. 

The first systematic training for nurses, through lectures and 
practical instruction on the wards, was begun in 1799 under the 
direction and tutelage of Dr. Valentine Seaman and continued 
throughout his association with the hospital until 18 17. 

The school of nursing, an integral part of the hospital, cele- 
brated the sixtieth anniversary of its founding last year and 
points with just pride to its fourteen hundred graduates who 
have contributed to community services through administration 
and teaching in schools of nursing and in public health organiza- 
tions as well as in the field of private nursing. 

In June 1927 The New York Hospital formed an association 
with the Cornell University Medical College. The resources of 
each institution were increased and an extensive program of 
building was begun. The new plant situated on York Avenue 
between Sixty-eighth and Seventy-first Streets was opened Sep- 
tember 1932 and offers unusual opportunities and facilities for 
the progressive development of the school of nursing. 

The school of nursing is registered with the Regents of New 
York State which permits its graduates to take the state board 
examinations in order to secure state registration. 

The hospital is approved by the American College of Sur- 
geons, approved for internships by the American Medical Asso- 
ciation and is a member of the American Hospital Association. 



[ 7 ] 



Aims of the School of Nursing 

Nursing offers a challenge to young women with exceptional 
personal and professional qualifications who are interested in 
social welfare. The aim of The New York Hospital School 
of Nursing is to prepare carefully selected students in the 
fundamental principles of nursing in its various clinical aspects 
as applied to home, hospital and public health services, with 
emphasis upon health teaching. The development of the indi- 
vidual student as a responsible member of civic and social life is 
a significant outcome of the program. 

Facilities for the School 

A special building for the school of nursing is adjacent to the 
hospital buildings. It provides adequate and well equipped class- 
rooms, laboratories, library and recreation rooms as well as 
attractive and comfortable living accommodations for students 
and faculty. 

Further necessary laboratory and library facilities are avail- 
able through association with the Cornell University Medical 
College. 

The clinical facilities of The New York Hospital are unsur- 
passed for the care and study of patients. The hospital with a 
potential capacity of one thousand beds admits all types of 
patients including medical, surgical, obstetrical, gynecological, 
pediatric and psychiatric, and the out-patient department pro- 
vides ample opportunity for the study of ambulatory patients. 

Affiliation is made with the Henry Street Visiting Nurse Serv- 
ice for field experience in public health nursing and with the 
Maternity Center Association and the Lobenstine Clinic for 
observation in obstetrical nursing in homes and prenatal and 
postnatal instruction. 

The social service department of The New York Hospital 
participates in the nursing course through the integration of 
.social service in the program of study. 

[ 8 ] 



Requirements for Admission 

The matriculation requirement is satisfactory graduation from 
an accredited high school or recognized preparatory school in 
which the following units of study have been taken: 

English 4 units 

History i unit 

Civics ]/ 2 unit 

Mathematics 2 units 

(Algebra i unit; plane geometry i unit) 
Science 2 units 

(Chemistry required; physics advised) 
Foreign Language 3 units 

(Three units of one language or two in 

each of two) 
Electives 3^ units 

Total 16 units 

Emphasis is placed upon scholarship of applicants. Preference 
in admission will be given to those who have had advanced study. 
It is advised that prospective students from college have intro- 
ductory chemistry, zoology or biology, physics and psychology. 
All students should review arithmetic prior to admission. 

Exceptions to these matriculation requirements may be made 
only by offering substitutions satisfactory to the Committee on 
Admissions. 

Besides these scholastic admission requirements students 
should be at least nineteen and not over thirty years of age and 
must present evidence of physical and personal fitness for nursing. 

A personal conference of the student and her parent or guard- 
ian with the director of the school of nursing is desirable and 
should be arranged after formal application has been submitted 
to the school. An appointment for an interview will be made 
upon request. 

All applications for admission should be addressed to the 

1 9 ] 



Director of the School of Nursing, 525 East Sixty-eighth Street, 
New York, New York. 

Citizenship Requirements 

According to the law of New York State every person ad- 
mitted to the examination for license as registered nurse in New 
York State at the termination of her course of study must sub- 
mit evidence that she is a citizen of the United States or has 
declared her intention of becoming a citizen. Such a license shall 
terminate and become void at the end of seven years from such 
declaration of intention if the holder has not become a citizen. 

Advanced Standing 

Advanced standing may be granted those students who pre- 
sent credentials showing satisfactory completion of courses of 
study taken in other schools deemed of similar or equal value 
to those given in The New York Hospital School of Nursing. 

An applicant who has received her baccalaureate degree may 
have her time in the school reduced by two or four months if 
she maintains a scholastic standing of an average of "B" grade 
in the first and second years provided this request is presented 
the last term of the second year. 

Accrediting by Cornell University 

To those students who may later wish to matriculate at the 
New York State College of Home Economics, Cornell Uni- 
versity, if they present all other necessary requirements, the 
curriculum of The New York Hospital School of Nursing will 
be credited to the amount of not less than forty-five hours, which 
is equivalent to one and a half academic years of college credit, 
toward the Bachelor of Science degree. 

The Curriculum 

The three-year curriculum of the school of nursing is so 
planned as to give each student a thorough understanding of 

[10] 




STUDENT CARES FOR CONVALESCENT PATIENT IN SOLARIUM 




THE PLAY TEACHER 



the basic sciences and principles underlying good nursing and 
of the best methods to use in the care of the sick, in the pre- 
vention of disease, and in health education. 

Each of the three school years is divided into terms of six- 
teen weeks each. 

During the first term and a half limited nursing practice is 
given in the pavilions of the hospital and the clinics of the out- 
patient department while a greater amount of time is spent in 
class and laboratory. In the subsequent seven and one-half terms 
the student's nursing practice increases in length of time and 
in responsibility. A sequence is planned to include the various 
types of clinical services during day, evening and night periods 
and visiting nursing in order that the student may acquire com- 
plete understanding of patients' needs. 

During these clinical terms each student is scheduled forty- 
eight hours per week which includes all class and nursing prac- 
tice assignments. 

Requirements oe Scholarship and Graduation 

Students are graded in their studies on a basis of weighted 
quality points with an average of two quality points required 
for promotion without condition and graduation. 

The following grading system has been established: 

A — Excellent 4 quality points 

B — Good 3 quality points 

C — Average 2 quality points 

D — Pass 1 quality point 

F — Failure o quality point 

I — Incomplete . . . Given in cases of absence and 

not because of poor scholarship 

Failure in any given subject may necessitate withdrawal from 
the school unless the student's scholarship is exceptional in other 
respects in which case repetition of the course may be recom- 
mended by the instructor. 

[12] 



Fees 

Matriculation Fee $10.00 

Payable at first registration; not refundable. 
Tuition Fee 100.00 

Payable at first registration $75.00 

Payable at beginning of second term, first 
year 25.00 

Not refundable. 

LABORATORY Fee (Anatomy, Chemistry, Microbiol- 
ogy, Nursing, Nutrition, Physiology) 25.00 

Payable at first registration; not refundable. 

Chemistry Breakage Fee 5.00 

Payable at first registration; amount not used for 
breakage to be refunded, or excess breakage to be 
paid. 

Health Service Fee 20.00 

Ten dollars payable at first registration and five at 
beginning of first terms, second and third years. 

Graduation Fee 15.00 

Payable at beginning of third term, third year. Re- 
fundable if student is not graduated. 

Total Fees for The New York Hospital School 

of Nursing $175.00 

Tuition Fee for Henry Street Visiting Nurse 

Service 25.00 



Total School Fees $200.00 

In addition to these fees students pay a Student Activity Fee 
of $5.00 each year which is collected by the class treasurer. 

Maintenance and General Expenses 

The school of nursing provides maintenance and limited gra- 
tuitous care in case of illness and furnishes each student with 

[13] 



I sii . 







THE GREEX DINING ROOM 




STUDY IN THE LIBRARY 



the uniform and cap of the school which remain the property 
of the school until graduation. Note health regulations and 
service page 16. 

The following estimated expenses must be met by the student: 

3rd vr. Optional 





ist yr. 


2nd yr. 


3rd yr. 




1st term 






Uniform aprons, bibs and 








accessories .... 


$22.00 




S4.OO 


Uniform shoes .... 


8.5O 


8.5O 


8.5O 


Uniform sweater 


4.OO 






Uniform cape .... 








Rental of two laboratory 








coats 


1. 00 






Rental of four Henry 








Street uniforms . 






5-00 


Books, keys, bandage scis- 








sors and miscellaneous 








supplies 


20.00 


5.OO 


5.OO 


Expenses for district visits 








and excursions 


5.00 


5.OO 


I5.OO 



$15.00 



.00 



$60.50 $18.50 $37.50 $30.00 

None of the aforementioned articles should be purchased be- 
fore admission to the school. Students should be provided w T ith 
an allowance for other personal needs determined by individual 
requirements. A list of limited necessary personal equipment 
will be sent each prospective student when accepted for admis- 
sion. For the three-year course the total cost to the student is 
estimated at three hundred and fifty dollars in addition to per- 
sonal expenditures as determined by the student. 

Registration and Orientation 

First-year students entering in the fall of nineteen hundred 
and thirty-nine must register at the school by ten o'clock on 
Saturday morning, September thirtieth; those entering in the 

[ 15] 



fall of nineteen hundred and forty on Saturday, September 
thirtieth. 

A brief orientation program precedes formal instruction. 
During this time students take required psychological tests and 
an arithmetic pre-test, have necessary physical examinations with 
Schick, Dick and Mantoux tests, confer with faculty advisers 
and secure uniforms, books and other equipment. 

Health Regulations and Service 

The school of nursing maintains a health service for its stu- 
dents. A well equipped infirmary with necessary staff is pro- 
vided in the nurses' residence. A physical examination by the 
school physician with chest x-rays is required upon admission to 
the school and subsequent annual physical examinations will be 
given. 

Vaccinations against typhoid fever and smallpox will be re- 
quested of all students before admission to the school. Schick 
and Dick tests and immunization for positive reactions will be 
required of all students before or after admission to the school. 
Mantoux tests will be given during the pre-clinical period and 
for those who are negative will be repeated at regular intervals. 

Gratuitous infirmary care for minor illnesses will be limited 
to four weeks at any one time in the case of all students. For 
more serious illnesses students will be cared for gratuitously in 
the hospital for not more than two weeks at any one time for the 
first-year students and not more than four weeks at any one 
time for second and third year students. Expenses for special 
nursing care and special therapies must be borne by the student 
or her family. 

Vacations and Other Absences 

During the first and second years a vacation of four weeks 
is given and during the third year one of two weeks. For first- 
year students one week's vacation is planned at Christmas (see 
calendar) and three weeks during the summer term. For all 
second-year students a vacation of four weeks is planned dur- 

[16] 



I 



ing the summer term of the year. For third-year students a two 
weeks' vacation is given during any one of the three terms. 
This vacation is not given to those students who have an ex- 
emption of time. 

All vacations are arranged by the school of nursing to con- 
form to the requirements of the educational program and the 
fields in which clinical practice is obtained. 

Except for first-year students during their first term, holidays 
are observed only in connection with class schedules. 

As a result of absences the repetition of a course of study 
or special examinations may be required; class registration may 
be changed and in necessary instances nursing practice will have 
to be made up. 

Student Loan Fund 

A student loan fund has been established to give necessary 
financial aid to those who show promise in nursing. These finan- 
cial benefits are not available to first-year students until after 
their first term's work. 

Applications for student loans should be made in writing to 
the Director of the School. 

EXTRA-CURRICULAR OPPORTUNITIES 

Believing that the education of young women today must 
include activities relating to healthful social relationships gen- 
erous provision for this development in the life of the student 
has been made. 

The beautiful fireproof, sixteen-story residence, erected adja- 
cent to the hospital buildings, is the center for these activities. 
Every effort has been made in its construction and equipment to 
provide for the normal and healthy life of students and faculty. 

Each of the eight student residence floors contains attractively 
furnished single bedrooms with lavatories, ample common baths, 
showers and toilet facilities, a common sitting-room with ad- 
joining kitchenette for informal gatherings and a laundryette. 

[17] 



Comfortable lounges, reading, reception and dining-rooms are 
on the first and ground floors. 

For further recreational activities, a large well equipped gym- 
nasium, billiard-room, game-room and porches are available. 
Arrangements for the use of an outdoor playground and an 
indoor swimming pool are made. 

To insure the full benefit and proper use of these facilities 
well qualified instructors are appointed to direct the social and 

recreational activities of the school. 

i 

School Government 

The school of nursing has a cooperative government in which 
the students take an active part. A student organization has 
been established and works actively with the Faculty Committee 
on Student Affairs in all matters relating to social and profes- 
sional conduct and discipline. 

An annual student activities fee of five dollars is required and 
collected by each class. 



GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE POLICIES 

The New York Hospital School of Nursing reserves the privilege of retaining 
in the school only those students who in the judgment of its faculty satisfy its 
requirements of scholarship, health and personal suitability for the nursing 
profession. 

It also reserves the prerogative of changing its curriculum, educational policies 
and fees as deemed necessary for the progressive development of the school. 



[18] 




A ROOM OF HER OWN 




r 



^ 




Ha 



v 




SUNDAY MORNING BREAKFAST IN THE FLOOR SITTING ROOM 



THE CURRICULUM 



First Year 



Anatomy 

Chemistry 

Microbiology 

Physiology 

History of Nursing 

Elementary Psychology 

Psychology of Deviate Behavior 

Introduction to Nursing Arts 

Professional Adjustments I . 

Nutrition and Cookery 

Diet Therapy 

Social and Economic Aspects of Health 
and Disease 

Pharmacology and Therapeutics 

Medicine 

Communicable Diseases 

Medical Nursing 

Surgery 

Surgical Nursing 

(Orientation — 22 hours — no credit, in- 
cludes Personal Hygiene — 8 hours) 



Class and Approximate 
Laboratory Hours 
Hours Practice 

. 60 

. 60 

. 66 
■ 45 

30 

30 

15 
. 140 

15 
30 
30 



Tot 



als 



15 480 

45 

15 480 

716 1275 



Credit 
Hours 

2 
2 
2 

2 
2 
I 

6y 2 

1 

1/2 

2 

2 



44 



[20] 



Second Year 

Class and Approximate Credit 

Laboratory Hours Hours 

Hours Practice 

Medical Nursing 192 1 }4 

Diet Therapy Practice 192 i l / 2 

Operative Technique 15 369 4 

Pediatrics 30 ... I J4 

Pediatric Nursing 30 708 S l / 2 

Obstetrics and Gynecology .... 30 ... 2 

Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing 30 708 8 

Development of Behavior in Children 30 ... 2 

Totals 165 2169 29 

Third Year 

Medical Nursing 8 280 2 J / 2 

Diet Therapy Practice 96 1 

Surgical Nursing 8 376 3j4 

Emergency Nursing 20 ... 1 

Psychiatry 45 ... 3 

Psychiatric Nursing 30 547 6 

Special Therapeutics 146 1 

Family and Community Health . . 20 ... 1 

Community Nursing Practice 384 3 

Out Patient Nursing Practice [92 2 

Private Patient Nursing Practice 192 2 

Professional Adjustments II ... 15 ... 1 

Totals 146 2213 27 

Grand Total Hours and Credit . . . 1027 5657 100 

Two or more hours per week of bedside instruction and individual conferences, 

■which approximate a total of two hundred and fifty hours, are included in the 
practice assignments. 

[21] 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

Preclinical Sciences 

1. Anatomy 

This course includes both gross and microscopical anatomy. 
The gross anatomy is taught by lectures, demonstrations and 
student dissection of the cadaver. The microscopical work is 
directly correlated with the gross dissection and includes a de- 
tailed study of prepared slides. Significant embryological infor- 
mation is included in the lectures. 

60 Hours, First Year 
Dr. Yntema 
Dr. Spofford 

2. Chemistry 

A course designed to acquaint students with the fundamental 
principles of inorganic and physiological chemistry with special 
application to nursing practice. Studies in the general composi- 
tion of the blood and urine, and in the digestion and utilization 
of foods are included. Lectures, recitations and laboratory. 

60 Hours, First Year 
Miss Rynbergen 

3. Microbiology 

The study of the habits and morphology of microorganisms 
emphasizing those of pathogenic character; sources, modes and 
prevention of infection; disinfection and asepsis; the more im- 
portant tissue changes occurring in the healing process, infec- 
tions and neoplasms; clinical microscopy of the blood and blood 
grouping; kidney function and urinalysis. Practical demonstra- 
tions and applications are made which relate directly to nursing. 
The blood group of each student is ascertained and recorded. 
Lectures, recitations and laboratory. 

66 Hours, First Year 

Dr. Stillman and Dr. Steften 

4. Pharmacology and Therapeutics 

A course designed to acquaint the student with the funda- 
mental weights, measures, terms and symbols used in the 
preparation and administration of drugs, common antiseptics, 
disinfectants and other solutions. A study of important and com- 
monly used drugs; their preparation, dosage, administration, 
physiological and therapeutic actions, idiosyncrasies, cumulative 
and minor toxic symptoms, antidotes and emergency treatments. 
Emphasis is placed on the accurate administration of drugs and 

[22] 



the careful observation of their effects through supervised prac- 
tice in nursing courses. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Daum 
5. Physiology 

This course is designed to give a basic understanding of the 
functions of the normal human body as an essential prerequisite 
to the study of health and nutrition and the pathological changes 
due to disease. Lectures, recitations, laboratory and demonstra- 
tions. 

45 Hours, First Year 
Miss Rynbergen 

Medical Nursing 

1. Medicine 

Medical aspects of diseases are considered in these lectures 
and clinics. Material presented will supplement, emphasize or 
interpret required reading covering etiology, sources of infec- 
tion, symptomatology, usual course, pathology, complications, 
treatment, prognosis and prevention. 

35 Hours, First Year 
Dr. DuBois and staff 

2. Communicable Diseases 

A study of communicable diseases, including tuberculosis. 

Special emphasis is placed upon etiology, modes of transmission 

and prevention. Lectures and clinics. 

25 Hours, First Year 
Dr. DuBois and staff 

3. Principles of Medical Nursing Including Communicable 

Disease Nursing 
Through lectures, clinics and demonstrations, students are 
taught principles and methods of nursing as applied to the care 
of medical patients. In the third year emphasis is placed upon 
managerial and teaching problems. 

15 Hours, First Year 
8 Hours, Third Year 
Miss Parker, Miss Daum and Miss Daniels 

4. Practice of Medical Nursing Including Communicable 

Disease Nursing 
Supervised practice and study of the application of medical 
nursing principles and methods to the care of patients on the 
medical pavilions of the hospital. In addition students study and 

[23] 



practice medical aseptic nursing as related to the care of patients 

suffering from communicable diseases including tuberculosis. 

Practice includes care of patients during day, evening and night. 

Demonstrations and conferences. 

952 Hours, First, Second and Third Years 
(Includes 192 hours of communicable disease nursing) 
Miss Parker, Miss Daum, Miss Daniels, Miss Arey, 
Miss Baxter, Miss Lalime and staff 

5. Practice in Care of Private Patients 

Application of principles of medical and surgical nursing to 
the care of private patients. 

192 Hours, Third Year 

Miss Moffatt, Miss Hobart, Miss O'Brien and staff 

Nursing 
1. Orientation 

This course is designed to give the beginning student a general 
conception of the field of nursing; the responsibilities and obliga- 
tions of each individual in choosing the profession; the impor- 
tance of general conduct in building up the right habits of living 
and attitudes of the nurse. Includes lectures in personal hygiene 
emphasizing the importance of physical and mental health espe- 
cially as it relates to the life of the nurse and is reflected in her 
work. 

22 Hours, First Year 

No credit 

Miss Wolf, Miss Kennedy, Miss Frost 

a. Introduction to Nursing Arts 

A course designed to give the student a basic understanding 
of the principles of nursing with emphasis upon her attitude 
toward her patient, the existing social relationships, the physical 
requirements for the proper care of patients and the procedures 
found most helpful for the promotion of health. 

140 Hours, First Year 
Miss Wyatt 

b. Practice of Elementary Nursing 

The application of the theories of nursing in laboratory prac- 
tice, in the surgical supply room and in the actual care of con- 
valescent patients in the pavilions and out-patient department 
of the hospital. 

315 Hours, First Year 

Miss Wyatt, Miss Zorn, Miss Bradshaw and Miss Gaute 

[24] 




NUTRITION* AND COOKERY CLASS 




SURGICAL TECHNIQUE DEMONSTRATED TO FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS 



2. History of Nursing 

A survey of the historical development of nursing from its 
early conception to modern times. Lectures and panel discussions. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Frost 

3. Professional Adjustments I 

A general consideration of fundamental ethical and phil- 
osophical principles and their application to problems which arise 
in the practice of nursing. An attempt is made to coordinate 
this course closely with each course of nursing practice through 
class discussions of pertinent problems. Lectures and recitations. 

15 Hours, First Year 
Miss Wolf 

4. Professional Adjustments II 

Through a general survey of the nursing field, the student has 
an opportunity to learn the trends and advances in the profes- 
sion; the need and opportunities for specialized preparation; the 
importance and types of legislation; the activities of professional 
organizations and the obligations of their members. Lectures 
and recitations. 

15 Hours, Third Year 

Miss Wolf and Special Lecturers 

5. Emergency Nursing 

This course supplements the instruction in nursing and deals 
with the application of these principles to emergency situations 
in the home and community. It demonstrates also the methods 
of teaching first aid to various groups. Lectures and demonstra- 
tions. 

20 Hours, Third Year 
Dr. Redden 

See description of other courses in nursing relating to specific 
clinical fields. 

Nutrition 

1. Nutrition and Cookery 

An elementary course in normal adult nutrition and in food 

preparation. The nutrition requirements in childhood and in 

pregnancy are discussed during the student's practice on pediatric 

and obstetric services. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Rynbergen 

[26] 



2. Diet Therapy 

A course designed to present the underlying principles in treat- 
ment of disease by means of special dietaries given concurrently 
with the lectures in Medical and Surgical Diseases. Lectures, 
recitations and laboratory. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Rynbergen 

3. Practice of Diet Therapy 

The application of the principles of diet therapy in super- 
vised practice on the pavilions in the hospital and in the out- 
patient clinic. Conferences and case studies. 

288 Hours, Second and Third Years 

Miss Gillam, Miss Rynbergen, Miss Perry 

and st a ft' 



Obstetrics and Gynecology 

1. Obstetrics and Gynecology 

This course deals with physiological and pathological changes 
during pregnancy, labor, and puerperium; the care of the nor- 
mal newborn; the nutrition of the mother and baby; the pre- 
vention of complications; the social significance of infant and 
maternal mortality; the relation of obstetrics to various gyneco- 
logical conditions; the results of infection and tumor growth and 
the required surgical interference and operative treatment. Lec- 
tures. 

30 Hours, Second Year 
Dr. Stander and staft 
Miss Rynbergen 

2. Principles of Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing 

This course emphasizes the importance of prenatal instruc- 
tion, observation and care; infant, obstetrical and gynecological 
nursing procedure with particular attention to infections and 
their special therapy. Classes, demonstrations and conferences. 

30 Hours, Second Year 
Miss Hickcox, Miss Klein, Miss Geiger, 
Miss Geuss and Mrs. Keith 

3. Practice of Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing 

Under supervised practice in the pavilions, nurseries, operat- 
ing rooms, labor and delivery rooms, and out-patient depart- 
ment, students have the opportunity to observe and care for 

[27] 



infants and obstetrical and gynecological patients. Nursing prac- 
tice, case studies and conferences. 

708 Hours, Second Year 
Miss Hickcox, Miss Doran, Miss Klein, 
Miss Geiger, Miss Geuss and staff 
Miss Frost and Mrs. Keith 

Pediatrics 

1. Pediatrics 

This course deals with normal growth and development and 
the diseases of infancy and childhood, with emphasis on infant 
welfare, prevention of morbidity and mortality and infant nutri- 
tion. Lectures and clinics. TJ c •, v 

30 Hours, Second Year 

Dr. Levine and staff 

2. Principles of Pediatric Nursing 

The basic principles in the care of well and sick infants and 
children are given together with the social, educational and nutri- 
tional aspects of their treatment and behavior as normal chil- 
dren. Classes, conferences and demonstrations. 

30 Hours, Second Year 

Miss Schubert, Miss Doran, Miss Ferguson, Miss Royle 

3. Practice of Pediatric Nursing 

This consists of supervised experience in aseptic nursing meth- 
ods in the care of infants and children in the pavilion, formula 
laboratory, premature nursery, out-patient department and nur- 
sery school. Case studies and conferences. 

708 Hours, Second Year 

Miss Schubert, Miss Doran, Miss Stone, Miss 

Ferguson, Miss Royle, Miss Clark, Miss Coulter, 

Miss Correll and staff 

4. Development of Behavior in Children 

A study of the normal child and his behavior. The suscepti- 
bility of the child's behavior responses to the various details of 
family life and of school will be emphasized. Lectures and reci- 
tations. 

30 Hours, Second Year 
Miss Whitley 

Personal Hygiene and Public Health 

1. Personal Hygiene 

(8 hours — Included in Orientation Course.) 

[28] 




BASKETBALL IS HEALTHFUL RECREATIOX 



2. Physical Education 

Each student will be required to participate in regular physical 
exercise designed primarily to maintain positive health with 
emphasis upon posture and corrective measures and to stimulate 
sportsmanship. 

128 Hours, First Year 

64 Hours, Second and Third Years 

Miss McDermott and Miss Anderson 

3. Social and Economic Aspects of Health and Disease 

A course of study given concurrently with the lectures on 
medical diseases emphasizing their social and economic aspects. 
It deals with the prevention of sickness and the promotion of 
health, with consideration of the contributing factors in home 
and community. Lectures and conferences. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Frost 

4. Family and Community Health 

A course of study given as preparation for practice in com- 
munity nursing. It considers the underlying principles of public 
health nursing; the aims and scope of health activities both pub- 
lic and private. Lectures, conferences, family case studies. 

20 Hours, Third Year 
Miss Frost 

5. Community Nursing Principles and Practice 

Supervised nursing practice in the out-patient department and 
in the home through affiliation with Henry Street Visiting Nurse 
Service. Contact with the home and observation of community 
agencies is also furnished in the out-patient department through 
the social service department and the tuberculosis district. 

384 Hours, Third Year 

Henry Street Visiting Nurse Service 

Miss Favell and staff 

192 Hours, Third Year 

Medical and Surgical Out-Patient Department 

Miss Frost, Miss Banfield, Miss Abbott and staff 

Miss Josephi and staff 

Psychiatry 

1. Psychiatry 

A course of study designed to acquaint students with psycho- 
pathic conditions, their etiology, pathology and treatment. In- 

[30] 



eluded in this course is an historical survey of psychiatry and 
the mental hygiene movement, a discussion of the problems most 
frequently found in the different periods of human develop- 
ment: nursery school age, pre-puberty, adolescent, climactic and 
senile. An introduction to the techniques and social agencies 
available in helping people meet their problems. 

45 Hours, Third Year 
Dr. Diethelm and staff 

2. Principles of Psychiatric Nursing 

This course is organized to give students an understanding 
of the basic principles in the nursing care of psychopathic pa- 
tients and the nursing procedures used in their treatment. 
Emphasis is placed also upon the relation of mental illness to 
physical illness and of early development to future adult life. 
Lectures, demonstrations and clinics. 

30 Hours, Third Year 

Miss Sprogell, Miss Corrigan, Miss Joinville, 

Miss Lewis, Miss Harvey and staff 

3. Practice of Psychiatric Nursing 

The application of the principles of psychiatric nursing 
through supervised practice in and conferences on the care of 
children and adults in the in-patient and out-patient depart- 
ments. Behavior studies and case studies. 
547 Hours, Third Year 

Miss Sprogell, Miss Corrigan, Miss Joinville, 
Miss Lewis, Miss Harvey and staff 

4. Special Therapeutics 

An opportunity is given the student to observe the application 
of hydrotherapy, occupational and recreational therapies to the 
needs of the individual patient. Conferences and supervised prac- 
tice. 

146 Hours, Third Year 

Miss Gunderson, Miss Brindle and Mr. Lawson 



Psychology 

1. Elementary Psychology 

An introduction to the study of human behavior and the un- 
derlying principles of mental adjustments and habit formation. 
An effort is made to apply this study to the student's own per- 
sonality and give her a more scientific basis by which she can 

[31] 



get a better understanding of the behavior of herself, her co- 
workers and her patients. Recitations and lectures. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Kennedy 
2. Psychology of Deviate Behavior 

A study of the deviations of adults and children, due to or- 
ganic and sociological factors, and of the nursing care necessary 
in assisting patients in making more adequate adjustments dur- 
ing illness. The principles of mental hygiene are emphasized. 

Lectures, recitations and clinics. 

15 Hours, First 1 ear 

Miss Kennedy 
Development of Behavior of Children (See Pediatrics) 

Surgical Nursing 

1. Surgery 

Surgical aspects of diseases are presented in these lectures and 
clinics. Factors determining the need for surgical interference 
are discussed and the major steps in the operation outlined. 
Special emphasis is placed upon signs, symptoms and observa- 
tions which should be made both preceding and following opera- 
tion as well as upon points which should be stressed in nursing 

these patients. 

45 Hours, tirst Year 

Dr. Heuer and staff 

2. Principles of Surgical Nursing 

Through lectures, clinics and demonstrations students are 
taught the principles and methods of surgical asepsis and the 
nursing of surgical patients. In the third year emphasis is placed 
upon managerial and teaching problems. 

15 Hours, First Year 
8 Hours, Third Year 
Miss Parker, Miss Keller, Miss Grainger, 
Miss Hills and Miss Harmon 

3. Practice of Surgical Nursing 

Supervised practice and study of the application of surgical 
nursing principles to the care of pre-operative and post-opera- 
tive patients on surgical pavilions of the hospital. Practice in- 
cludes care of patients during the day, evening and night. Dem- 
onstrations and conferences. 

856 Hours, First and Third Years 

Miss Parker, Miss Keller, Miss Grainger, Miss Hills, Miss 

Arey, Miss Harmon, Miss Lalime, Miss Baxter and staff 

[32] 



4. Operative Technique 

This course is designed to give thorough preparation and to 
develop skill in surgical aseptic technique; to develop alertness 
to observations of significant changes in patients during the ad- 
ministration of anaesthetics; to develop dexterity and intelligent 
response in assisting with operations and in meeting emer- 
gencies in the general operating room and gynecological operat- 
ing room. 

15 Hours, lectures, demonstrations and conferences 
369 Hours, practice — Second Year 
Miss Parker, Miss Lyons, Miss Jensen and staff 




STUDY IN A CONFERENCE ROOM 



[33] 



THE SOCIETY OF THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 



Officers 
Barklie Henry .... 
Augustine J. Smith . . 
Bronson Winthrop . . 



Augustine J. Smith 
Bronson Winthrop 
Cornelius N. Bliss 
Paul Tuckerman 
William Woodward 
Arthur Iselin 
G. Beekman Hoppin 



Board of Governors 
R. Horace Gallatin 
Joseph H. Choate, Jr. 
Frank L. Polk 
John Hay Whitney 
Vincent Astor 
Barklie Henry 
Langdon P. Marvin 
Williamson Pell 



Vice-President 
Secretary- 
Treasurer 

George T. Bowdoin 
Robert Winthrop 
Henry S. Sturgis 
Paul G. Pennoyer 
Livingston Farrand, 
Landon K. Thorne 
W. Gibson Carey, Jr 



M.D* 



Assistant to the Treasurer 
Walter J. Nichols 

Custodian 
United States Trust Company of New York 



Administrator-in-Chief 
Murray Sargent 

Superintendent 
George W. Wheeler, M.D. 



COUNCIL OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Augustine J. Smith, Chairman 
Barklie Henry, ]' ice-Chair man 
Anna D. Wolf, R. N., Secretary 

Class of 1939 
Livingston Farrand, M. D. Mary M. Roberts, R.N. 

Class of 1940 
Augustine J. Smith Mary Beard, R.N. 

Class of 1941 
Eugene F. Du Bois, M.D. Flora Rose 

Ex-Officio 
Barklie Henry, Vice-President of The Society of the New York Hospital 
Edmund E. Day, President of Cornell University 
Murray Sargent, Administrator -in-Chief 

Henricus J. Stander, M.D., President of the Medical Board 
Anna D. Wolf, R.N., Director of the School of Nursing 

[34] 



ALUMNAE COMMITTEE OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 
Mary Beard, Chairman 

Lydia E. Anderson Annie W. Goodrich, Vice-Chairman 

M i\ n if. H. Jordan Lillian D. Wald 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 

Executive-Curriculum Committee 
\\ \a D. Wolf, Chairman Verda Hickcox Bessie A. R. Parker 

Charlotte S. Argabrite Cora Kay Agnes Schubert 

Gertrude Ban field May Kennedy Carolyne Sprogell 

Harriet Frost Alice Maud Moffatt Margaret Wyatt 

Sarah E. Moore 

Committee <>n Nursing Principles and Practices 

Margaret Wyatt, Chairman Sylvia Abbott Catherine Geuss 

Caroline Keller, Vice Chair-HELEN Daum Dorothy Hobart 

man and Secretary SARAH KerGUSOX MARGARET JoiNVILLE 

Committee on Admissions , Promotions and Graduation 

Mary Klein, Chairman Margaret Grainger Sarah E. Moore 

Eleanor Corrigax Dorothy Jacobus Margaret Wyatt 

Committee on Library , Publications and Teaching Facilities 

MaY Kennedy, Chairman Harriet Frost Elizabeth Harmon 

Persis Arey Elizabeth Geiger Florence M. Harvey 

Flora Bergstrom Edna Royle 

Committee on Student and Staff Health 

Harriet Frost, Chairman Gertrude Banfield Eleanor Lewis 

Phyllis Anderson Helen Clark Dr. Marian Tyndall 

Elsie Davies 

Committee on Records 

May Kennedy, Chairman Dorothy Jacobus Bessie A. R. Parker 

Verda Hickcox Margaret Joinville Agnes Schubert 

Cora Kay 

Committee on Student Affairs 

Gertrude Banfield, Chairman Mary McDermott Margaret Wyatt 

Eleanor Corrigan Bessie Parker 

Committee on Revisions and Resolutions 
Cora Kay. Chairman Dorothy Allison Harriet Frost 

Committee on Student Loans 
Carolyne Sprogell, Chairman Lucy Macdonald Jeanette Walters 

[35] 



OFFICERS OF 
ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY 

Anna D. Wolf, M.A., R.N. 

Director of the School of Nursing 
and Director of the Nursing Service 

B.A. Goucher College, 191 1; Diploma in Nursing, The Johns Hopkins 
Hospital School for Nurses, 191 5; M.A. Teachers College, Columbia 
University, 1916; Robb Fellow, Teachers College, Columbia University, 
1925-1926; Instructor and Assistant Superintendent of Nurses, The Johns 
Hopkins Hospital School for Nurses, 1916-1919; Instructor of Nursing, 
Vassar Training Camp for Nurses, Summer 191 8; Superintendent of 
Nurses, Peking Union Medical College, Peking, China, 1919-1924; Dean 
of the School of Nursing, ibid., 1924-1925; Associate Professor of Nursing 
and Superintendent of Nurses, The University Clinics, The University 
of Chicago, 1926-1929; Associate Professor of Nursing and Director of 
Nursing, ibid., 1929-193 1 ; Director of the School of Nursing and Director 
of the Nursing Service, The New York Hospital, 1931-. 

Harriet Frost, R.N. 

Associate Director, School of Nursing; 
Director, Public Health Nursing 

Diploma in Nursing, St. John's Hospital, Yonkers, 1906; Course in Public 
Health Nursing, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1915-1916; As- 
sistant Superintendent and Superintendent of Nurses, St. John's Hospital, 
1908-1910; Superintendent, Mercer Hospital, Trenton, 1913-1915; Direc- 
tor, Department of Instruction, Visiting Nurse Society, Philadelphia, 1916- 
1932; Supervisor, Public Health Nursing Department, Pennsylvania 
School of Social and Health Work, 1919-1932; Associate Director, The 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932- ; Director, Public Health 
Nursing, ibid., 1932-. 

May Kennedy, M.A., R.N. 

Associate Director, School of Nursing; 
Director of Pedagogy 

Diploma in Nursing, St. Joseph's Hospital, Chicago, 1907; B.S. Teachers 
College, Columbia University, 1917 ; M.A. University of Chicago, 1932; 
Chief Nurse, Illinois State Hospitals, 1907-1918; General Staff Nurse and 
Chief Nurse, American Expeditionary Forces, France, 1918-1919; Super- 
intendent of Nurses, Indianapolis City Hospital, 1919-1920; Director of 
Nursing and Director of Illinois State School of Psychiatric Nursing, 
Illinois Department of Public Welfare, 1920-1932; Lecturer, University 
of Chicago, Summer Quarters, 1928-1931 ; Director of Institutes, 1922-; 
Lecturer, University of Wisconsin, one semester, 1931-1932; Lecturer, 
De Paul University, Summer Session, 1929; Associate Director, The New 
York Hospital School of Nursing 1932-; Director, Pedagogy, ibid., 1932-.. 

[36] 



ASSISTANT DIRECTORS 

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS & MEMBERS OF OTHER 

HOSPITAL DEPARTMENTS * 

Charlotte S. Argabrite, R.N. 

Administrative Assistant, 
Night Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Bellevue Hospital School of Nursing, 1907; Charge, 
Surgical Supply Room, Bellevue Hospital, 1907-1908; Private Duty, 
1909-1913; Night Supervisor, Bellevue Hospital, 1913-1914; First As- 
sistant Superintendent of Nurses, Bellevue Hospital, 1914; Superintendent 
of Nurses, Hinton Hospital, Hinton, West Virginia, 1914-1915; Acting 
Superintendent of Nurses, Columbia Hospital, Washington, D. C, 1 < ) 1 7 ; 
Superintendent of Nurses, Harlem Hospital, 1917-1918; Private Duty, 
1919-1930; Registrar, District Registry for Nurses, 1931-1932; Registrar, 
Bellevue Alumnae Registry, 1932- 1934; Administrative Assistant, Night 
Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1935; Administrative Assistant, 
Evening Nursing Service, ibid, 1936; Private Duty, 1937-1938; Adminis- 
trative Assistant, Night Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1938-. 

Gertrude S. Banfield, B.A., R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing; 
Head of Out-Patient Nursing Instruc- 
tion and Service 

B.A. Vassar, 1918; Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of 
Nursing, New York, 1920; Assistant Head Nurse, Medical Ward, Pres- 
byterian Hospital, New York, 1920; General Staff Nurse and Head 
Nurse, Out-Patient Department, Peking Union Medical College, Peking, 
China, 1921-1924; Supervisor, Max Epstein Clinics, The University of 
Chicago Clinics, 1927-193 1 ; Assistant Director, The New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1932- ; Head of Out-Patient Nursing Instruction and 
Service, The New York Hospital, 1932-. 

Florence Eatox, B.A. 

Director, Payne Whitney 
Nursery School 

B.A. Colby, 1918; Part-time Student, Columbia University, 191 8; Stu- 
dent, Longy School of Music, Boston, 1921-1922; Part-time Student, 
Harvard Graduate School of Education and Boston University, 1923- 
1924; Diploma, Nursery Training School of Boston, 1925; Student. 



* Arranged alphabetically. 

[37] 



Summer Session, London Academy of Music, 1931 ; Director, Cambridge 
Nursery School, 1925-1932; Assistant Director and Director, Pre-School 
Summer Camps, 1924, 1927, 1932, 1934, 1935; Assistant Director, 
Nursery Training School of Boston, Summer, 1925; Instructor in Music, 
ibid., 1927-1932; Children's Supervisor, Vassar Summer Institute of 
Euthenics, 1928; Director, Out-Patient Nursery School, Payne Whitney 
Clinic, The New York Hospital, 1932-1933; Director, Payne Whitney 
Nursery School, The New York Hospital, 1933-. 

S. Margaret Gillam, M.A. 

Director, Department of Nutrition 

Teacher's Diploma, Home Economics, Mechanics Institute, Rochester, 
New York, 1916; B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1922; 
M.A., ibid., 1923; Dietitian, Rochester General Hospital, 1918-1919; 
Superintendent, Woman's Industrial Home, Medical Lake, Washington, 
1 9 19-192 1 ; Director, Dietetics and Housekeeping, University of Michigan 
Hospital, 1923-1932; Instructor, Institutional Management, Teachers 
College, Columbia University, Summers 1924-1930 and 1935- ; Instructor, 
Nutrition, Department of Public Health and Hygiene, University of 
Michigan, 1925-1932; Instructor in Nutrition, Extension Division, ibid., 
1930; Director, Department of Nutrition, The New York Hospital, 
1932-. 

Verda F. Hickcox, B.S., R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing ; 
Head of Obstetrical and Gynecological 
Nursing Instruction and Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School for Nurses, Chicago, 
191 6; Certificate of Public Health, Chicago School of Civics and Philan- 
thropy, 1919; B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1927; 
C. M. B., General Lying-in Hospital and School of Midwifery, London, 
England, 1928; Chief Nurse, Longfellow Mining and Accident Hospital, 
Morenci, Arizona, 1916-1918; General Staff Nurse, U. S. Army Base 
Hospital No. 13, France, 19 18-19 19; Psychiatric Social Worker, Psychi- 
atric Hospital, Dunning, Illinois, 1920; Community Nurse, American 
Red Cross, Morenci, Arizona, 19201922; Private Duty, 1922-1924; 
General Staff Nurse, University of Wisconsin Hospital, 1924-1925; Pri- 
vate Duty, 1925-1926; Supervisor, Visiting Nurse Association, York, 
Pennsylvania, 1927-1928; Instructor and Assistant to Director, Brooklyn 
Maternity Center Association, 1928; Instructor of Midwifery and Super- 
visor of Obstetrical and Gynecological Departments, Siriraj Hospital, 
Bangkok, Siam, 1 929-1 931 ; Consultant Nurse, Maternity, Infancy and 
Child Hygiene, New York State Department of Health, 1931-1932; As- 
sistant Director, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932- ; 
Head of Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing Instruction and Service, 
The New York Hospital, 1932-. 

[38] 



Cora E. Kay, B.S., R.X. 

Administrative Assistant, Evening Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, St. Luke's Hospital School of Nursing, Chicago, 
1921 ; B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1936; Instructor, 
Nursing Principles and Practice and Supervisor of Wards, Allegheny 
General Hospital, Pittsburgh, 1921-1923; Assistant Superintendent of 
Nurses, St. Luke's Hospital School of Nursing, St. Louis, 1923-1926; 
Instructor, Nursing Principles and Practice, St. Luke's Hospital School of 
Nursing, Chicago, 1926-1927; Principal, School of Nursing and Director, 
Nursing Service, Chicago Memorial Hospital, 1927-1928; Instructor, 
Nursing Principles and Practice and Second Assistant to Superintendent 
of Nurses, Clifton Springs Sanitarium and Clinic, 1929-1932; Evening 
Supervisor, Medical and Surgical Nursing Service, The New York Hos- 
pital, 1932-1937; Administrative Assistant, Evening Nursing Service, ibid., 
1937;. 

Mary T. McDermott, M.A. 

Director, Nurses' Residence ; 
Instructor, Physical Education 

Diploma, Bouve Boston School of Physical Education, 191 6; Special 
Courses, Harvard University, 1917, 1919, 1931; People's College, Den- 
mark, 1926; B.S. New York University, 1930; M.A. ibid., 1932; Super- 
visor, Physical Education, Third Supervisory District, Greene County, 
N. Y., 1915-1918; Supervisor, Physical Education, City Schools, Fitch- 
burg, Massachusetts, 1918-1919; Supervisor of Playground, Concord, 
Massachusetts, 1919; Supervisor, Physical Education, City Schools, Revere, 
Massachusetts, 1919-1921 ; Supervisor of Playground, Brookline, Massa- 
chusetts, 1 92 1 ; Director, Recreation and Physical Education, Stockbridge, 
Massachusetts, 1921-1922; Director, Recreation, City of New Haven, 
1922-1924; Director, Physical Education and Health, State Teachers 
College, Fitchburg, Massachusetts, 1924- 1929; Director, Physical Edu- 
cation, Dalton Experimental School, New York, 19301931 ; Assistant 
Director Student Activities, New York University, 1931-1932; Instructor, 
Physical Education, ibid., Summer, 1932; Instructor, Physical Education, 
The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; Director, Nurses' 
Residence, ibid., 1932-. 

Alice Maud Moffatt, R.N. 

Head of Private Patients' Nursing Service 

Bishop Bethune College, Oshawa, Canada, 1904-1906; Diploma in Nurs- 
ing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1912; Private Duty, 
1912-1915; General Staff Nurse, Hopital Militaire V. R. 76, France, 
1915-1916; Supervisor, Private Patients' Building, The New York Hos- 
pital, 1917-1932; Head of Private Patients Nursing Service, The New 
York Hospital, 1932-. 

[39] 



Sarah E. Moore, R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing; 
Administrative Assistant, Day Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 191 3; 
Part-time Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, and New York 
University, 1914, 1926, 1927, 1928; Teacher, Public Schools, 1903-1908; 
Head Nurse, The New York Hospital, 1913-1918; Instructor, Practical 
Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1918-1922; Assist- 
ant Directress of Nurses, ibid., 1923-1932; Acting Directress of Nurses, 
ibid., 1932; Administrative Assistant, Day Nursing Service, The New 
York Hospital, 1932-. 



Bessie A. R. Parker, B.S., R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing, 
Head of Medical and Surgical Nursing 
Instruction and Services. 

Graduate Provincial Normal School, Fredericton, N. B., Canada, 1905; 
Diploma in Nursing, Rhode Island Hospital Training School for Nurses, 
Providence, 19 1 8 ; B.S. Teachers' College, Columbia University, 1937; 
Teacher, Public Schools, 1905-1915; Assistant Superintendent of Nurses 
and Instructor, Nursing Practice, Rhode Island Hospital Training School 
for Nurses, 19 18- 1920; Assistant Superintendent of Nurses and Instruc- 
tor, Nursing Practice, Bridgeport General Hospital School of Nursing, 
1 920- 1 92 1 ; Assistant Superintendent of Nurses and Instructor, Nursing 
Practice, Methodist Episcopal Hospital School of Nursing, Brooklyn. 
1921-1926; Superintendent of Nurses, ibid., 1926-1932; Administrative 
Assistant, Evening Nursing Service, The New York Hospital, 1932-1935; 
Assistant Director, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1936-; 
Head of Medical and Surgical Nursing Instruction and Services, The 
New York Hospital, 1936-. 

Agnes Schubert, M.S., R. N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing; 
Head of Pediatric Nursing Instruction 
and Service 

B.S. Northwestern University, 1 9 1 7 ; Diploma in Nursing, Western 
Reserve University School of Nursing, 1926; M.S. Teachers College, 
Columbia University, 1932; Evening Supervisor, Babies' and Children's 
Hospital, Western Reserve University, 1926-1927; Assistant Instructor 
and Supervisor, ibid., 1927-1928; Assistant Director, ibid., 1928-1930; 
Supervisor and Instructor, Bobs Roberts Hospital, The University of Chi- 
cago Clinics, 1930-1931; Assistant Director, The New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1932-; Head of Pediatric Nursing Instruction and 
Service, The New York Hospital, 1932-. 

[401 



Theodate H. Soule, M.A. 

Director, Social Service 

B.A. Smith College, i <j i 7 ; B.S. Simmons College School of Social Work, 
[919; M.A. University of Chicago School of Social Service Administra- 
tion, [929; Medical Social Worker, Massachusetts General Hospital, 
[919-1923; Director of Social Service, Municipal Hospital, Hartford, 
Connecticut, 1923-1927 and 1934-1938; Head Worker, Pediatric Social 
Service, Washington University Clinics and Allied Hospitals, St. Louis, 
[929-1934; Director of Social Service, New York Hospital. 1938-. 

Carolyn k A. Sprogell, B.S., R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing; 
Director, Psychiatric Nursing 

Diploma in Nursing, St. Lukes Hospital School of Nursing, New York, 
1924; Post-graduate Course, Psychiatry, Bloomingdale Hospital, 1930; 
B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1936; Head Nurse, South- 
ampton Hospital, 1924; Night Supervisor, ibid., 1925; Private Duty, 
1926; Assistant Superintendent and Instructor, Practical Nursing, South- 
ampton Hospital, 1927-1928; Supervisor, St. Lukes Hospital, New York, 
1929; Assistant Director of Nurses, Bloomingdale Hospital, 1930-1931 ; 
Acting Director of Nurses, ibid., 1931-1932; Assistant Director, The New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932- ; Director, Psychiatric Nursing, 
Payne Whitney Clinic, The New York Hospital, 1932-. 



r 41 1 




CORNER IX STUDENT LOUNGE 




IX FICTION LIBRARY 






INSTRUCTORS AND SUPERVISORS * 

Sylvia Abbott, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Medical and 
Surgical Out-Patient Nursing Service 

Diploma, Washington State Normal School, 1927; Diploma in Nursing, 
Massachusetts General Hospital School of Nursing, 1931 ; Certificate in 
Public Health Nursing, Simmons College, 1938; Charge Nurse, Mary 
Imogene Bassett Hospital, Cooperstown, New York, 1931-1932; Staff 
Nurse, Community Health Association, Boston, 1932-1937; Instructor, 
Medical and Surgical Out-Patient Nursing, The New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1938- ; Supervisor, Out-Patient Nursing Service, The 
New York Hospital, 1938-. 

Dorothy E. Allison, R.N. 

Instructor and Night Supervisor, 
Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing Service 
Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, Chicago, 
1932; General Staff Nurse, Obstetrical and Gynecological Service, The 
New York Hospital, 1932-1934; Assistant Head Nurse and Head Nurse, 
ibid., 1934-1936; Private Duty, 1936-1937; Instructor, Obstetrical and 
Gynecological Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, I937-; 
Night Supervisor, Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing Service, The 
New York Hospital, 193 7-. 

Persis S. Arey, R.N. 

Instructor and Evening Supervisor, 
Medical and Surgical Nursing Services 
Diploma in Nursing, Rhode Island Hospital School of Nursing, 1921; 
Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1933-1934; Instructor, 
Nursing Principles and Practice, Rhode Island Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing, 1921-1924; Assistant Instructor, Nursing Principles and Practice, 
Indiana University Hospital School of Nursing, 1926; Supervisor, Out- 
Patient Department, Providence Lying-in Hospital, 1927-1930; Super- 
visor, Obstetrical and Gynecological Department, Strong Memorial 
Hospital, 1931-1933; Supervisor, Maternity Department, Presbyterian 
Hospital, Philadelphia, 1935; Second Assistant Superintendent of Nurses, 
Rhode Island Hospital, 1936; Instructor, Medical and Surgical Nursing, 
The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1937- ; Evening Supervisor, 
Medical and Surgical Nursing Services, The New York Hospital, 193 7-. 

Margaret Baxter, R.N. 

Instructor and Night Supervisor, 
Medical and Surgical Nursing Services 

Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1934; 

Part-t ime Student, Hunter College, 1937; General Staff Nurse and As- 

* Arranged alphabetically. 

[43] 



sistant Head Nurse, Medical Pavilions, The New York Hospital, 1934- 
1937; Instructor, Medical and Surgical Nursing, The New York Hos- 
pital School of Nursing, 1937- ; Night Supervisor, Medical and Surgical 
Nursing Service, The New York Hospital, 1937-. 

Henrietta P. Boutox, B.A., R.N. 

Instructor, Medical Social 
Service Principles and Practice 

B.A. Wellesley College, 1906; Diploma in Nursing, The New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1921 ; Part-time Student, Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1924, 1 93 1 ; Instructor, Medical Social Service Principles and 
Practice, The New York Hospital Social Service Department, 1933-. 

Helen B. Clark, R.N. 

Instructor and Night Supervisor, 
Pediatric Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Massachusetts General Hospital, 193 1 , Student, 
Teachers College, Columbia University, Summer 1933 an d Part-time 
Student, 1936-1937; Part-time Student, Simmons College, 1934-1935; 
Head Nurse and Instructor, Pediatric Nursing, Massachusetts General 
Hospital, 1931-1935; Head Nurse and Instructor, Pediatric Nursing, 
Nassau Hospital, 1935-1936; Instructor, Pediatric Nursing, The New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, 1936- ; Night Supervisor, Pediatric 
Nursing Service, The New York Hospital, 1936-, 

Barbara Correll, B.S. 

Dietitian, Children's Clinic 

B.S. Eureka College, Eureka, Illinois, 1928; Graduate of Dietetics, St. 
Luke's Hospital, New York, 1929; Dietitian, Madison Hospital, New 
York City, 1930-1932; Dietitian, Surgical Service, The New York Hos- 
pital, 1932-1935; Dietitian, Children's Clinic and Milk Formula Room, 
ibid., 1935-. 

Eleanor M. Corrigan, R.N. 

Instructor and Administrative Assistant. 
Psychiatric Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, St. Luke's Hospital School of Nursing, New York, 
1927; Post-graduate Course in Psychiatry, Bloomingdale Hospital, 1932; 
Part-time Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, I933- X 939; 
Operating Room Supervisor, St. Luke's Hospital, New York, 1929-1932; 
Head Nurse, Payne Whitney Clinic, The New York Hospital, 1932- 
1935 ; Instructor, Psychiatric Nursing, The New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, 1935- ; Supervisor, Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic; The 
New York Hospital, 1935-1937; Administrative Assistant, ibid., 1937-. 

[44] 



Virginia Daniels, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, 
Medical Nursing Service 

Beloit College, 1923-1924; Frances Shimer Junior College, 1925-1926; 
Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, Chicago, 
1930; B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1937; General Staff 
Nurse, Presbyterian Hospital, Chicago, 19301931; Private Duty and 
Staff Nurse, Chicago Visiting Nurse Association, 1 931 -1932; General 
Staff Nurse, Medical and Surgical Nursing Service, The New York Hos- 
pital, 1932-1934; Head Nurse, ibid., 1934-1936; Instructor, Medical and 
Surgical Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1936- ; 
Evening Supervisor, Medical and Surgical Nursing Service, The New 
York Hospital, 1936-193 7; Instructor, Medical Nursing, The New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1937- ; Supervisor, Medical Nursing, The 
New York Hospital, 193 7-. 

Helen M. Daum, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, 
Medical Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 191 8; 
B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1932; Private Duty Nursing, 
1918-1929; School Nursing, Ottawa, Illinois, 1929-1930; Head Nurse, 
Medical Pavilion, The New York Hospital, 1932-1934; Instructor, Med- 
ical Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1934- ; Assistant 
Medical Supervisor, The New York Hospital, 1934-1935; Supervisor, 
Medical Nursing Service, ibid., 1935-. 

Catharine Dimock, B.S. 

Dietitian, Nutrition Clinic 

B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1935; Student Dietitian, Food Clinic, 
Boston Dispensary, 1935-1936; Dietitian, Nutrition Clinic, The New 
York Hospital, 1936-. 

Ruth Doran, M.A., R.N. 

Instructor, Public Health Nursing 

B.A. University of Illinois, 192 1 ; Diploma in Nursing, Johns Hopkins 
Hospital School for Nurses, 1924; Certificate in Midwifery, Lobenstine 
Midwifery Clinic, 1934; M.A. Teachers College, Columbia University, 
1938; Head Nurse and Night Supervisor, Woman's Clinic, Johns Hop- 
kins Hospital, 1924-1927; Head Nurse, Medical Ward, Albert Merritt 
Billings Hospital, 1927-1928; Instructor, Ophthalmological Nursing, Wil- 
mer Clinic, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 1929-1930; Evening Supervisor, 
Albert Merritt Billings Hospital, 1930-1931 ; Director, Obstetrical Nurs- 
ing Service, St. Louis Maternity Hospital, 1932-1936; Instructor, Public 
Health Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1937-. 

[45] 



Sarah M. Ferguson, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, 
Pediatric Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Children's Hospital School of Nursing, Boston, 
1932; Part-time Student, Hunter College, 1938; General Staff Nurse, 
Assistant Head Nurse and Head Nurse, Pediatric Nursing Service, The 
New York Hospital, 1932-1937; Instructor, Pediatric Nursing, The New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, 1937-; Supervisor, Pediatric Nursing 
Service, The New York Hospital, 1937-. 

Elin Friberg, R.N. 

Instructor and Assistant Night Supervisor, 
Psychiatric Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Long Island College Hospital, 1932; Post-Graduate 
Course in Psychiatry, Bloomingdale Hospital, 1932-1933; Part-time Stu- 
dent, Teacher's College, Columbia University and Hunter College, 1934- 
1938; General Staff Nurse, Payne Whitney Clinic, The New York Hos- 
pital, 1933-1934; Assistant Head Nurse, ibid., 1934-1935; Instructor, 
Psychiatric Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1935- ; 
Assistant Night Supervisor, Payne Whitney Clinic, The New York Hos- 
pital, 1935-. 

E. Elizabeth Geiger, R.N. 

Instructor New Born Care and Supervisor of 
Nurseries, Obstetrical Nursing Service. 

Student, Illinois Woman's College, 1919-1921 ; Diploma in Nursing, Wes- 
ley Memorial Hospital School of Nursing, 1924; Part-time Student, 
University of Chicago, 1934- 1936; Supervisor, Pediatric Department, 
Wesley Memorial Hospital, 1925-1927; Supervisor, Out Patient Depart- 
ment, Northwestern University Medical School, 1927-1933; Head Nurse, 
Pediatric Nursing Service, The New York Hospital, 1933; Supervisor, 
ibid., 1933-1934; Supervisor, Staff Health Service and Director, Social 
Activities, Children's Memorial Hospital, Chicago, 1934-1936; Instructor, 
New Born Care, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1936- ; 
Supervisor of Nurseries, Obstetrical Nursing Service, The New York 
Hospital, 1 936-. 

Catherine P. Geuss, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, 

Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing Service 

Diploma in Teaching, Northeast Missouri Teachers College, 1924; 
Diploma in Nursing, Michael Reese Hospital School of Nursing, 1928; 
Diploma, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Woman's Hospital, New York, 
1929; Student, University of Chicago, 1930; B.S. and Diploma in Super- 
vision, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1932; Student, Columbia 

[46] 









University, 1938; Teacher, 19 19- 1924; Head Nurse and Instructor, Ob- 
stetrical Nursing, Michael Reese Hospital, 1929-1930; Supervisor, Sur- 
gical Wards, ibid., 1 930-1 931 ; Instructor, Obstetrical and Gynecological 
Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932- ; Assistant 
Supervisor, Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing Service, The New York 
Hospital, 1932-1935; Supervisor, ibid., 1935-. 



Margaret F. Grainger, B.A., R.N. 

Instructor and Surgical Supervisor, 
Surgical and Urological Nursing Service 

B.A. Butler University, 1927; Diploma in Nursing, Johns Hopkins 
Hospital School for Nurses, 1930; Head Nurse, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 
1 930- 1 931; Assistant Director, Practical Nursing, Johns Hopkins Hos- 
pital School for Nurses, 1931-1934; Assistant Superintendent of Nurses, 
Johns Hopkins Hospital, 1934-1935; Instructor, Surgical and Urological 
Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1935- ; Supervisor, 
Surgical and Urological Nursing Service, The New York Hospital, 1935-. 



Elizabeth Harmon, B.A., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, 
Surgical Nursing Service 

B.A. College of Wooster, 1928; Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hos- 
pital School of Nursing, Chicago, 193 1 ; General Staff Nurse, Presbyterian 
Hospital, Chicago, 1931-1932; General Staff Nurse, The New York Hos- 
pital, 1932-1934; Head Nurse, ibid., 1934-1937; Instructor, Medical and 
Surgical Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1937; 
Night Supervisor, Medical and Surgical Nursing Service, The New York 
Hospital, 1937-1938; Instructor, Surgical Nursing, The New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1938-; Supervisor, Surgical Nursing Service, 
The New York Hospital, 1938-. 



Florence M. Harvey, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor 
Psychiatric Nursing Service 

B.S. Colby College, 1925; Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital 
School of Nursing, New York, 1934; Post Graduate Course, Psychiatry, 
Westchester Division, New York Hospital, 1934; Student, Teacher's Col- 
lege, Columbia University, 1937 1 General Staff Nurse, Payne Whitney 
Psychiatric Clinic; The New York Hospital, 1935; Head Nurse, ibid!, 
1936; Instructor, Psychiatric Nursing, Butler Hospital, Providence, 1938; 
Instructor, Psychiatric Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing, 1939- J Supervisor, Payne Whitney Clinic, The New York Hospital, 
1 939-- 

[47] 



Thirza L. Hills, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor 
Surgical Nursing Service 

University of Illinois, 1916-1918; Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hos- 
pital School for Nurses, Chicago, 1925; Student, University of Chicago, 
Summer, 1927; Course in Public Health Nursing, Henry Street Settle- 
ment, two months, 1936; Part-time Student, Teachers' College, Colum- 
bia University, 1937-1938; Staff nurse, Presbyterian Hospital, Chicago, 
1925-1926; Assistant Night Supervisor, ibid., 1926-1927; Instructor, 
Surgical Procedures, ibid., 1928-1929; Head Nurse, ibid., 1929-1932; 
Head Nurse, Obstetrical Service and Surgical Service, The New York 
Hospital, 1932-1935; Instructor, Surgical Nursing, The New York Hos- 
pital School of Nursing, 1935-; Supervisor, Surgical Nursing Service, The 
New York Hospital, 1935-. 

Dorothy Hobart, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, 
Private Patient Nursing Service 

B.S. Denison University, 1925; Diploma in Nursing, The New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1933; Part-time Student, Teachers College, 
Columbia University, Fall 1928, 1934, 1937; Teacher, 1925-1930; Gen- 
eral Staff Nurse, Private Patient Service, The New York Hospital, 1933- 
1934; Head Nurse, Semi-Private Floor, ibid., 1934-1937; Instructor, Pri- 
vate Patient Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1937- ; 
Supervisor, Private Patient Nursing Service, The New York Hospital, 
I937-. 

Margaret Joinville, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, 
Psychiatric Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, The Army School of Nursing, 1929; Part-time Stu- 
dent, Hunter College and Teacher's College, Columbia University, 1933- 
J939; Private Duty, 1929-1931 ; Assistant Head Nurse, Bloominsdale 
Hospital, 1931-1932; Head Nurse, Payne Whitney Clinic, The New York 
Hospital, 1932-1936; Instructor, Psychiatric Nursing, The New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1936-; Supervisor, Payne Whitney Clinic, 
The New York Hospital, 1936-. 

Margaret Crabtree Keith, B.S. 

Dietitian, Woman's Clinic 

B.S. University of Washington, 1932; Dietetic Certificate, King County 
Hospital, Seattle, 1933; Graduate Study, New York Hospital and Co- 
lumbia University, 1935; Dietitian, Northern State Hospital, Sedro 
Wolley, Washington, 1933-1935; Dietitian, Woman's Clinic, The New 
York Hospital, 1935-. 

[48] 



Caroline Keller, B.A., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Surgical 
Nursing Service 

B.A. Smith College, 1921 ; Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital 
School of Nursing, New York, 1929; Instructor, Miss Day's School, 
New Haven, 1921-1924; Instructor, The Holman School, Philadelphia, 
1924-1925; Head Nurse, Surgical Ward, New Haven Hospital, 1929- 
1930; Assistant Supervisor, Surgical Nursing, New Haven Hospital, 
1930-1932; Instructor, Surgical Nursing, The New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, 1932- ; Supervisor, Surgical Nursing Service, The New York 
Hospital, 1932-. 



Mary Elizabeth Klein, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Obstetrical 
and Gynecological Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Hahnemann Hospital School of Nursing, 1916; 
B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1936; Supervisor, Private 
Hospital, Guayaquil, Ecuador, 1917-1918; Private Duty, 1918-1921 ; 
Supervisor, Private Floors, Hahnemann Hospital, 1921-1925; Supervisor, 
Operating Rooms, ibid., 1925-1928; Head Nurse, Maternity Hospital, 
Western Reserve University, 1 929-1 930; Supervisor and Assistant In- 
structor, ibid., 1930-1932; Instructor, Obstetrical and Gynecological Nurs- 
ing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932- ; Supervisor, Ob- 
stetrical and Gynecological Nursing Service, The New York Hospital, 
1932-. 



Mary Kyer, R.N. 

Instructor, Operative Technique and Practice ; 
Assistant Supervisor, General Operating Rooms 

Diploma in Nursing, Samaritan Hospital School of Nursing, Troy, New 
York, 1932; General Staff Nurse, Samaritan Hospital, 1932-1933; Gen- 
eral Staff Nurse and Head Nurse, Operating Rooms, The New York 
Hospital, 1933-1937; Instructor, Operative Technique and Practice, The 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1937- ; Assistant Supervisor, Gen- 
eral Operating Rooms, The New York Hospital, 193 7-. 



Marie A. Lalime, R.N. 

Instructor and Evening Supervisor, 
Medical and Surgical Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Misericordia Hospital School of Nursing, 1926; 
Part-time Student, Teacher's College, Fordham University, 1933- 1934; 
Head Nurse, Male Surgery, Misericordia Hospital, 1926-1927; Private 
Duty, 1927-1928; Supervisor in Obstetrics, Misericordia Hospital, 1928- 

[49] 



1935 5 Private Duty, 1935-1936; General Staff Nurse, The New York 
Hospital, 1936-1937; Evening Head Nurse, Emergency Pavilion, ibid., 
1937-1938; Instructor, Medical and Surgical Nursing, The New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1938- ; Evening Supervisor, Medical and 
Surgical Service, The New York Hospital, 1938-. 

Eleanor Lewis, B.A., B.N., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Psychiatric 
Out-Patient Nursing Service 

B.A. Radcliffe College, 1925; B.N. Yale University School of Nursing, 
1928; Nurse in Charge, Urological Clinic, New Haven Hospital, 1928- 
1929; Psychiatric Nursing, Four Winds Sanatorium, Katonah, New York, 
1 929- 1 932; Assistant Head Nurse, Children's Service, Payne Whitney 
Clinic, The New York Hospital, 1932-1933; Staff Nurse, ibid., 1933- 
1934; Staff Nurse, Brooklyn Visiting Nurse Association, 1934-1935; In- 
structor, Psychiatric Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 
I 935S Supervisor, Psychiatric Out-Patient Nursing Service, Payne Whit- 
ney Clinic, The New York Hospital, 1935-. 

Veronica Lyons, B.S., R.X. 

Instructor, Operative Technique and 
Practice ; Supervisor, General 
Operating Rooms. 

Cornell University, 1921-1922; Diploma in Nursing, Johns Hopkins Hos- 
pital School for Nurses, 1927; B.S. Teachers College, Columbia Univer- 
sity, 1936; Head Nurse, Gynecological Ward, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 
1927-1928; Head Nurse, Surgical and Gynecological Ward, Binghamton 
City Hospital, 1928-1929; Suture Nurse, Operating Room, Moore- 
Overton Hospital, Binghamton, 1929; Office Assistant, Eye, Ear, Nose 
and Throat Surgeon, 1929-193 1 ; Instructor, Nursing Principles and 
Practice, Montefiore Hospital School of Nursing, 1931-1932; Head Nurse, 
Woman's Clinic, The New York Hospital, 1932-1935; Assistant to Di- 
rector of Nurses, New Rochelle Hospital, 1936-1937; Instructor, Opera- 
tive Technique and Practice, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 
I 937S Supervisor, General Operating Rooms, The New York Hospital, 
I937-. 

Lucy J. Macdonald, R.N. 

Supervisor, Private Operating Room 

Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1927; 
Part-time Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1927; Head 
Nurse, Surgical Ward, The New York Hospital, 1927; Suture Nurse, 
Public Operating Room, ibid., 1 928-1 931 ; Supervisor, Private Operating 
Room, ibid., 1932; Head Nurse, Emergency Pavilion, ibid., 1932-1933; 
Supervisor, Private Operating Room, ibid., 1934-. 

[50] 



Ethel Oatman, R.N. 

Instructor and Night Supervisor, 
Psychiatric Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Butler Hospital School of Nursing, 1929; Part-time 
Student, Brown University, 1929-1930; Part-time Student, Syracuse Uni- 
versity, 1935-1936; Part-time Student, Hunter College, I937 _I 939; As- 
sistant Head Nurse and Head Nurse, Butler Hospital, 1929-1930; Pri- 
vate Duty, 1 93 1 ; General Staff Nurse, Syracuse Memorial Hospital, 1932- 
1936; Head Nurse, Payne Whitney Clinic, The New York Hospital, 
1936; Instructor, Psychiatric Nursing, The New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, 1937- ; Night Supervisor, Payne Whitney Clinic, The New 
York Hospital, 1937-. 

Madeleine O'Brien, R.N. 

Evening Supervisor, 
Private Patient Nursing Service 
Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1924; 
Charge Nurse, Men's Medical Pavilion, The New York Hospital, 1925; 
Private Nursing, 1926-1937; Evening Supervisor, Private Patient Nurs- 
ing Service, The New York Hospital, 1937-. 

Mabel W. Perry, B.S. 

Dietitian, Nutrition Clinic 

B.S. Battle Creek College, 1933; Dietetic Certificate, Montefiore Hospi- 
tal, 1934; Dietitian, Food Clinic, Boston Dispensary, 1934; Associate 
Dietitian, Food Clinic, Beth Israel Hospital, Boston, 1935; Research Die- 
titian, Diagnostic Hospital, New England Medical Center, Boston, 1935- 
1936; Dietitian, Burrough's Newsboys Foundation Health Education De- 
partment, Boston, 1934-1936; Dietitian, Nutrition Clinic, The New York 
Hospital, 1 936-. 

Edna E. Royle, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, 
Pediatric Nursing Service 
Diploma in Nursing, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia School of 
Nursing, 1931 ; Summer School and Part-time Student, University of 
Pennsylvania, 1934, 1937; Part-time Student, Teachers College, Columbia 
University, 1938; Head Nurse and Instructor, Milk Laboratory, Chil- 
dren's Hospital of Philadelphia, 1931 ; Assistant Educational Director, 
ibid., .1931-1937; Instructor, Pediatric Nursing, The New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1937- ; Supervisor, Pediatric Nursing Service. The 
New York Hospital, 1937-. 

Henderika J. Rynbergen, M.S. 

Instructor, Nutrition 
B.S. Simmons College, 1922; M.S. Cornell University Medical College, 
1938; Nutrition Worker Neighborhood Kitchen, Boston, 1922-1924; Food 

[51] 



Clinic Dietitian, Washington University Dispensary, Barnes and Allied- 
Hospitals, St. Louis, 1 924- 1 926; Head Dietitian, Sea View Hospital, New 
York, 1927; Ward Dietitian, Presbyterian Hospital, New York, 1927- 
1928; Food Clinic Dietitian, Vanderbilt Clinic, ibid., 1928-1929; Dieti- 
tian, American University Hospital, Beirut, Syria, 1929- 1934; Instructor 
in Nutrition, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1934-1938; 
Instructor of Chemistry, Physiology and Nutrition, ibid., 1938-. 

Mildred N. Stone, R.N. 

Instructor and Evening Supervisor,. 
Pediatric Nursing Service 

Student, University of Vermont, 1928-1929; Diploma in Nursing, The 
Children's Hospital School of Nursing, Boston, 1932; Part-time Student, 
Teachers College, Columbia University, 1936-1938; General Staff 
Nurse, Assistant Head Nurse and Head Nurse, Pediatric Service, The 
New York Hospital, 1932-1935; Evening Supervisor, ibid., 1935-1936; 
Head Nurse, ibid., 1936-1937; Instructor, Pediatric Nursing, The New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, 1937- ; Evening Supervisor, Pediatric 
Nursing Service, The New York Hospital, 1937-. 

Jeanette Walters, R.N. 

Instructor and Evening Supervisor, ObstetricaL 
and Gynecological Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Temple University Hospital School of Nursing, 
1923; Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, Summer 1924, 
Part-time Student, ibid., 1933, 1934, 1935; Part-time Student, New York 
University, 1937-1938; Post-Graduate Course, Obstetrics, Woman's Hos- 
pital, New York, 1932; Supervisor, Medical and Surgical Ward, Temple 
University Hospital, 1924- 1925; Supervisor, Babies' Hospital, Philadel- 
phia, 1926-1928 ; Assistant Superintendent, Columbia Hospital, 1928-1929; 
Supervisor, Obstetrical Department, Temple University Hospital, 1930; 
Instructor, Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing, The New York Hos- 
pital School of Nursing, 1932- ; Evening Supervisor, Obstetrical and Gyne- 
cological Nursing Service, The New York Hospital, 1932-. 

Margaret Wyatt, B.A., R.N. 

Instructor, Nursing Arts 

B.A. Meredith College, 1923; Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hos- 
pital School of Nursing, 1927; Student, Teachers College, Columbia 
University, Summers 1931-1935; Instructor and Assistant to the Dean of 
Women, Meredith College, 1923- 1924; Head Nurse, Surgical Ward, The 
New York Hospital, 1927- 1930; Instructor, Nursing Arts, The New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, 1930-. 



52] 



HEAD NURSES AND CHARGE NURSES 
ASSISTANT INSTRUCTORS 



Medical and Surgical Services 



Marjorie Arehart, R.N. 

Margaret Bissell, R.N. 

Mrs. Margit J. Brandt, R.N. 

Mrs. Ruth G. Brockman, R.N. 

Olga Chernek, R.N. 

Fern E. Christensen, R.N. 

Virginia Cockes, R.N. 

Barbara Derr, R.N. 

Isobel Donnelly, R.N. 

Mrs. Edna L. Eckel, R.N. 

Mrs. Eleanor Greenyvay Huested, R.N. 



Evelyn Kern, R.X. 
Mrs. Helen Helmus, R.N. 
Dorothy E. Meyer, R.N. 
Frances A. Morrison, R.N. 
Ruth Roberts, R.N. 
Emily Rogers, B.A., R.N. 
Charlotte Sowers, R. N. 
Charlotte Steuer, R.N. 
Eva V. Steinburg, R.N. 
Dorothy Vernstrom, R.N. 
Katherine Zorn, R.N. 



Out-Patient Service 



Mrs. Anne Beard, R.N. 
Evelyn S. Clark, R.N. 
Alcida H. Coulter, R.N. 
Irene Curley, R.N. 
Mrs. Katherine Drucklieb, 
Elsie M. Fiege, R.N. 
Mrs. Vivian B. Hyer, R.N. 



R.N. 



Lucile M. Lambert, R.N. 
Evelyn Liddle, R.N. 
Pauline M. Murphy, R.N. 
Mrs. Elsa Nussbaumer, R.N. 
Mrs. Celia Pehr, R.N. 
Margaret Rouchleau, R.N. 
Rebecca Talbott, R.N. 



Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic 



Stella Copley, R.N. 
Samuel Cloud, R.N. 
Inez Gnau, R.N. 
Martin Grothe, R.N. 
Enid Kircaldie, R.N. 
Mary Kutz, R.N. 



Grace Lundgren, R.N. 
Mrs. Beatrice McKee, 
Mrs. Blanche Skerky, 
Jessie Weaver, R.N. 
Arlene Wilson, R.N. 
Orpha Wood, R.N. 



R.N. 
R.N. 



Pediatric Service 

Norween K. Fisher, R.N. 
Margaret Kelly, R.N. 

Ruth 



Della Meachard, R.N. 
Margaret Schaub, R.N. 
Woodfall, R.N. 



Private and Semi-Private S 



er vices 



Elizabeth Bickford, B.A., R.N. 

Alma Blenkin, R.N. 

Alice Burlin, R.N. 

Mrs. Marie B. Clarke, R.N. 

Grace Coates, R.N. 

Mildred Harrington, R.N. 



R.N. 



Mrs. Geraldine H. Harris, R.N. 
L. Marguerite McGrath, R.N. 
Philomene M. Marshall, 
Jeanette Stone, R.N. 
Myrna E. Wight, R.N. 
Helen Yesulaitis, R.N. 



Woman's Clinic 



Henrietta Eppink, R.N. 
Dorothy S. Fisher, R.N. 
Edith Gaeckle, R.N. 
Beulah M. Hartman, R.N. 
Wilma C. Hawkinson, R.N. 
Virginia G. Henry, R.N. 

Ruth B 



Wilson 

[53] 



Eda E. Hoewischer, R.N. 
Mildred A. Jensen, R.N. 
Veronica Matus, R.N. 
Emily Mugford, R.N. 
Vera Rothenberger, R.N. 
Rose Valpreda, R.N. 
R.N. 



ASSISTANT HEAD NURSES 
DAY AND NIGHT SERVICES 



Medical and Surgical Services 



Mary Capuano, R.N. 
Martha Jane Demy, R.N. 
Beulah E. Detrick, R.N. 
Gertrude Eaman, R.N. 
Antoinette T. Fedorowicz, R.N. 
Theresa Folz, R.N. 
Christine Fritch, R.N. 
Cecelia Goral, R.N. 
Evelyn Harbig, R.N. 
Jessica Harsen, R.N. 
Mary Haver, B.A., R.N. 
Ruth Hoskins, R.N. 
Ruth Johnston, R.N. 
Cornelia Kittredge, R.N. 

Mrs. Eunice 



M. Elizabeth Landis, R.N. 
Evelyn S. Linton, R.N. 
Ruth Pauline Loucks, R.N. 
Mrs. Hazel Minarcek, R.N. 
Marion Pilling, R.N. 
Elizabeth H. Ray, B.A., R.N. 
Pauline Roberts, R.N. 
Mrs. Jean Robinson, R.N. 
Rosalind Seuberling, R.N. 
Beatrice Snyder, R.N. 
Carol Sturtevant, R.N. 
Mrs. Catherine Sullivan, R.N. 
Mrs. Elizabeth Taitot, R.N. 
Madeline Tracy, R.N. 
Volpe, R.N. 



Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic 



Gertrude Dale, R.N. 
Mary Goforth, R.N. 
Paul Hani.on, R.N. 
Elizabeth Hili.iard, R.N 
James MacLeod, R.N. 



Albert Payson, R.N. 
Mrs. Margaret Rath bone, R.N. 
Alice Thoreson, R.N. 
Agnes Troxell, R.N. 
Dorothy Wei. born, R.N. 
Faye Wise, R.N. 



Lucy Louise Church, 
Carietta Fox, R.N. 



Pediatric Service 



R.N 



Ola Macpherson, R.N. 
Agnes Rieman, R.N. 



Helen K. Berchtold, R.N 
Jean E. Blampied, R.N. 
Isabel A. Curry, R.N 
Agnes G. Damaska. R.X. 



Private and Semi-Private 

Meredith E. Keller, R.N. 
Mrs. Jessie Macintosh, R.N. 
Mrs. Virginia S. Sweeney, R.N. 
Lois Mary Tait, R.N. 



Bernice L. Thompson, R.N. 



Woman', 

Martha C. Aii.es, R.X. 
Esther L. Ambrose, R.N. 
Wilma V. Benner, R.N. 
Margaret L. Benson, R.N. 
Amelia Alice Bowman, R.N. 
Mrs. Hilda F. Brown, R.N. 
Selma F. Buchdahl, R.N. 
Helen Eleanor Burns, R.N. 
Mrs. Florence Campbell, R.N. 
Thelma Cobb, R.N. 

Lor Etta Ellen 



Clinic 

Marciana Cortes, R.N. 
Eunice Greenwood, R.N. 
Elizabeth J. Hazen, R.N. 
Elsie M. Johnston, R.N. 
Grace Dorothy Kingsley, R.N. 
Mary C. Littler, R.N. 
Florence J. Shive, R.N. 
Irene Stackhouse, R.N. 
Mrs. Marjorie Tyner, R.N. 
Louise Woermbke, R.N. 
Wright, R.N. 



54] 



STUDENT AND STAFF HEALTH 

Marian Tyndall, M.D Physician-in-Charge 

Mildred Evans, M.D. Consultant Psychiatrist 

Elsie Davies, R.X Supervisor, Infirmary 



ASSISTANTS IN ADMINISTRATION 

Flora Josephine Bergstrom, R.N Librarian 

Ella Bullen, B.A Secretary 

Helen Cleary .... Secretary 

Dorothy Jacobus, B.A Secretary-Registrar 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY MEDICAL COLLEGE FACULTY 
AND OTHERS PARTICIPATING IN INSTRUCTION * 

GUSTAV I. Steffen. Ph.D Assistant Clinical Pathologist 

Ralph G. Stillman, M.D Assistant Professor of Clinical Pathology 

W. R. Spoffard, Ph.D Instructor, Anatomy 

Chester Loomis Yntema, Ph.D Assistant Professor of Anatomv 



Eugene F. DuBois, M.D., and Staff Professor of Medicine 

Oskar Diethelm, M.D., and Staff Professor of Psychiatry 

George S. Heuer, M.D., and Staff Professor of Surgery 

Samuel Z. Levine, M.D., and Staff Professor of Pediatrics 

Henricus J. Stander, M.D., and Staff . Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology 



Fannie Bradshaw Director, Theatre Studio 

Camille Gaute Instructor of Massage 

R. C. Redden, M.D 

Mary T. Whitley, Ph.D 

Professor of Psychology. Teachers College, Columbia University 



MEMBERS OF AFFILIATING ORGANIZATION 

Hazel Corbin. R. X Maternity Center Association 

General Director 

Katharine Favell, M.A.. R.X Visiting Nurse Service, 

General Director of Xursing Henry Street Settlement 



* Arranged alphabeticallv. 

[55] 



•". 




ON THE WAY TO HOSPITAL 



THE SOCIETY OF THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 



THE 

NEW YORK HOSPITAL 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 



Supplementary Announcement 

GRADUATE COURSES 

1939—1940 



VOLUME VII NUMBER 1 




THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL— SOUTH VIEW 



GENERAL STATEMENT 

The New York Hospital School of Nursing offers to graduate 
nurses courses in Medical Nursing, Obstetrical and Gynecological 
Nursing, Psychiatric Nursing, Surgical Nursing and Operating Room 
Technique and Management. These courses are designed for nurses 
desiring a broader preparation in one specific branch of clinical 
nursing and for those who are seeking information and experience 
in the modern methods of care and treatment. 



College Credit 

Students who complete these courses with good standing and who 
meet other matriculation requirements for the Bachelor of Science 
degree at Teachers College, Columbia University, may receive credit 
toward that degree and also satisfy the requirement for advanced 
preparation in a clinical field which is a prerequisite for certain 
major programs in the Nursing Education Division. 

The Faculty and Facilities for Study 

Instruction is given by the faculties of the New York Hospital 
School of Nursing and the Cornell Medical College. The clinical 
departments of the New York Hospital, the Payne Whitney Psychi- 
atric Clinic and the Lying-in Hospital, integral parts of the New 
York Hospital, offer unusual opportunities for practice in the selected 
fields. The hospital has a capacity of nine hundred and eleven beds 
for acutely ill patients and one hundred and thirty-one bassinettes 
for newborn infants, with approximately one hundred and twenty- 
five operations weekly. An active out-patient department with a 
daily average of approximately 1100 visits provides for the study 
of ambulatory patients. 

The library of the school of nursing contains over fifteen hundred 
volumes besides pamphlets on medicine, nursing and allied subjects 
as well as current publications. The Cornell Medical College library 
is available to students of the nursing school. In addition to these 
main libraries, reference materials are available on the various floors 
of the hospital. 

en 



Matriculation Requirements 

An applicant for admission should be between the ages of twenty- 
two and thirty-five, a graduate of a high school of good standing and 
of an accredited school of nursing. She must also be a registered 
nurse and present evidence of personal and professional fitness for 
the special type of nursing for which she has applied. Arithmetic 
with emphasis upon ratio, percentage and the metric system should 
be reviewed before admission. 

In addition to the general requirements for admission, an applicant 
for the course in Operating Room Technique and Management will 
be required to present evidence of the following: 

1. Satisfactory completion of not less than six weeks' experience in a 
general operating room while an under-graduate student. 

2. At least six months' additional experience in an operating room as 
a graduate nurse. 

3. Experience of at least one year as a head nurse or an assistant head 
nurse. 

4. Graduation from a school of nursing within five years. 

Concerning Admission 

Applications for admission should be addressed to the Director 
of the School of Nursing, 525 East Sixty-eighth Street, New York, 
New York, and should be sent as early as possible preceding the 
term in which the applicant desires to enter the school. 

Registration is always on the day preceding the date of admission. 
All students will be expected to remain through the day of registra- 
tion for the succeeding term. 

Admission Dates 
1939 
September 1 

April 29, June 1 
September 1 
September 30, 
December 30 

June 1, September 30 



Medical Nursing 
Obstetrical Nursing 



1940 
August 31 

February 1, May 1 
June 1, August 31 
October 1, 
December 31 



Psychiatric Nursing 
Surgical Nursing 



June 1, September 30 



Operating Room Technique and Management- 

[2] 



February 1, June 1 
October 1 

February 1, June 1 

October 1 

-the first of each month 



Health Regulations 

Each applicant is required to present evidence of physical fitness 
before admission. A pulmonary x-ray within four months of admis- 
sion to the school is required for each graduate student except for 
those in Operating Room Technique and Management who must file 
their films one month before admission. Each student should have 
had smallpox vaccination within the past seven years and typhoid 
inoculation within the past three years. Each student registered 
for obstetrics is required to have had a negative Schick test and a 
report of a Dick test; immunization for positive Schick test is obliga- 
tory. An applicant registering for this course is also required to 
present a report of two successive negative throat cultures for strepto- 
coccus hemolyticus taken within two weeks prior to the date of ad- 
mission. Another throat culture will be taken on arrival at the school 
and subsequently as indicated. 

The school of nursing maintains a health service for all students 
Gratuitous infirmary care for graduate students will be limited to 
two weeks for a student in the school less than six months, and four 
weeks for those in the school six months or more. If infirmary 
care is required over these allotted times, it must be paid for at the 
rate of $1.00 per diem by the student. 

Free hospital service is not given graduate students. Arrangements 
for necessary hospitalization may be made through the hospital ad- 
missions office. Expenses for special nursing care and special ther- 
apies such as blood transfusions and medications must be borne by 
the student. 

Expenses 

Two plans for meeting the expenses of the courses are made de- 
pendent upon the choice of the student. 

For both plans the school of nursing provides each student with 
single room, board and laundry. 

Plan I. If the student registers for the course whose schedule is fifty- 
two hours per week, a monthly stipend of ten dollars is granted. 

Plan II. Students registering for the course whose schedule is 48 hours 
per week will not receive a monthly stipend. 

Maintenance and stipend are considered a working scholarship. 

[3] 



A matriculation fee of ten dollars, a health service fee of five 
dollars and a house activity fee of fifty cents for six months or less 
are required of each student at the time of registration. The students 
who register for the course under Plan II must also pay a tuition 
fee of forty dollars in addition to all other expenses. These fees 
are not refundable. 

Each student is required to purchase handbook, note-books, nursing 
manuals and metric system card costing approximately five dollars. 

Each student is also required to pay deposits for room, locker and 
post office keys amounting to twenty- five cents each. These fees 
are refundable at the completion of the course. 

Each student must provide her own uniform and should wear the 
graduate or the student uniform, with cap, of her own school. Low 
heeled white or black shoes with rubber lifts must be worn. 

Curriculum 

Each clinical course offered has a definite program of studies as 
described in the following pages. 

Two plans are offered. These differ only in relation to the amount 
of practice given by the student for which a difference in expense to 
the student has been noted. 

Plan I. The schedule includes theory and practice with conferences 
and case studies amounting to fifty-two hours per week. 

Plan II. The schedule includes theory and practice with conferences 
and case studies amounting to forty-eight hours per week. 

A maximum of four weeks of evening or night duty may be re- 
quired in both plans. 

Students are expected to attend classes regularly, to do assigned 
reference reading, to write case studies and term papers and to par- 
ticipate in class discussion. 

At the end of the course if the student has satisfactorily met all 
requirements a transcript of her record of scholastic achievement in 
class and nursing practice will be given to her. A fee of one dollar 
is charged for each additional transcript. 

£4] 



Medical Nursing 

Advisor: Bessie A. R. Parker, B.S., R.N. 
Head of Medical and Surgical 
Nursing Instruction and Services 

This course is designed for the graduate nurse who desires to 
broaden her background in medical diseases and to learn the newer 
methods used in the treatment and care of medical patients. 

The course is open to a limited number of students once a year. 

Lectures, clinics, demonstrations and conferences 90 hours 

Nursing 120. Medical Diseases _ 45 hours 

Nursing 121. Principles of Medical Nursing _ 30 hours 

Health Nursing 150. Social and Economic Aspects 

of Health and Disease _ 15 hours 

Nursing Practice 

Nursing 122. Practice in Medical Nursing _ _ 4 months 

Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing 

Advisor: Verda Hickcox, B.S., R.N. 
Head of Obstetrical and 
Gynecological Nursing 
Instruction and Service. 

Basic Course 

This course is designed for the graduate nurse who desires to 
learn newer methods in obstetrical and gynecological nursing and to 
increase her skill in the care of the obstetrical and gynecological 
patient and the newborn. 

Lectures, clinics, demonstrations and conferences 90 hours 

Nursing 130. Obstetrics and Gynecology 45 hours 

Nursing 131. Principles of Obstetrical and Gyne- 
cological Nursing 45 hours 

Nursing Practice 

Nursing 135. Practice in Obstetrical and Gynecological Nurs- 
ing and Care of the Newborn „...4 months 

[5} 



Advanced Course 

A limited number of students of at least one year's satisfactory 
experience in nursing, having personal qualifications of maturity, 
physical health and definiteness of purpose may register for a second 
period of advanced study upon recommendation of the faculty of the 
department. 

Lectures and conferences _ _ -..._ 60-75 hours 

Required : 

Nursing 190. Ward Management _....30 hours 

Nursing 191. Ward Teaching _ 30 hours 

Nursing 132. The Management of Obstetrical Units 

including bedside teaching 15 hours 

Applicants having completed the required units of study may elect 
from the following list up to a total of 75 hours: 

Electives : 

Health Nursing 150. Social and Economic Aspects of Health 

and Disease _ 15 hours 

Psychology 170. Elementary Psychology 30 hours 

(Available during Winter term only) 

Nursing 160. Psychiatry 45 hours 

Nursing Practice 

Nursing 136. Practice in Ward Management and Ward 

Teaching _ 4 months 

Psychiatric Nursing 

Advisor: Carolyne A. Sprogell, B.S., R.N. 
Director of Psychiatric Nursing 
Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic 

This course is designed for the graduate nurse who desires knowl- 
edge of the underlying organic, functional and social causes of mental 
illness and the opportunity to acquire an understanding of the teach- 
nique and skill in the care of mental patients. 

[6] 



Nurses who have had a previous affiliation in psychiatry may be 
accepted for the four month course upon the recommendation of 
the faculty of the department. Those who have had no previous 
affiliation in psychiatry will be required to enroll for the two four 
month courses. 

Previous course in Psychology recommended. 

The first four months: 

Lectures, clinics and conferences _ 90 hours 

Nursing 160. Psychiatry _ „ _ _..45 hours 

Nursing 161. Principles of Psychiatric Nursing.. 30 hours 

Nursing 163. Principles of Special Therapeutics 15 hours 

Nursing Practice 

Nursing 165. Practice in Psychiatric Nursing 4 months 

The second four months : 

Lectures, clinics and conferences 60 hours 

Health Nursing 150. Social and Economic Aspects 

of Health and Disease 15 hours 

Nursing 190. Ward Management _ 30 hours 

Nursing 167. Management of Psychiatric Units 15 hours 

Nursing Practice 

Nursing 165. Practice in Psychiatric Nursing 4 months 

Surgical Nursing 

Advisor: Bessie A. R. Parker, B.S., R.N. 
Head of Medical and Surgical 
Nursing Instruction and Services 

This course is designed for graduate students who desire a broader 
background in surgical nursing, and who wish to acquaint themselves 
with the more modern methods of surgical treatment of diseases. The 
course is limited to sixteen students admitted every four months. 

Lectures, clinics, demonstrations and conferences 90 hours 

Nursing 180. Surgery 40 hours 

Nursing 181. Principles of Surgical Nursing..- 35 hours 

Health Nursing 150. Social and Economic Aspects 

of Health and Disease 15 hours 

[7] 



Nursing Practice 

Nursing 182. Practice in Surgical Nursing 4 months 

Note: A period of two additional months practice may be arranged for a 
limited number of students who have demonstrated their interest and 
fitness for the field chosen. 

Operating Room Technique and Management 

This course, covering a period of six months, is planned to prepare 
a limited number of especially qualified nurses to become head nurses 
or assistant supervisors in a general operating room. 

Lectures, clinics, demonstrations and conferences 100-1 15 hours 

Nursing 191. Ward Teaching „ „ » 30 hours 

Nursing 184. Operating Room Management and 

Supervision „ 15 hours 

Nursing 180. Surgery „....40 hours 

Nursing 183. Operative Technique 15 hours 

Practice 

Nursing 183. Practice Teaching of Operative Tech- 
nique 1 5 hours 

(Available to a limited number of students, 
depending upon their interest and qualifi- 
cations) 
Nursing 185. Practice in Operating Room Technique and 

Management — 6 months 

Description of Courses 
Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing 

Nursing 130. Obstetrics and Gynecology 45 hours 

This course deals with the physiological and pathological changes during 
pregnancy, labor and the puerperium ; the care of the normal newborn ; 
the prevention of complications; the social significance of infant and 
maternal mortality; the relation of obstetrics to various gynecological 
conditions ; the results of infection and tumor growth and the required 
surgical interference and operative treatment. 
Lectures and clinics „....Dr. Stander and staff 

Nursing 131. Principles of Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing...45 hours 
This course emphasizes the importance of prenatal instruction, observa- 
tion, and care; the nutrition of mother and baby; obstetrical and 
gynecological nursing procedures with particular attention to infec- 
tions and their special therapy. 
Lectures, demonstrations and conferences, 

Miss Hickcox and staff ; Miss Rynbergen 

[8] 



Nursing 132. The Management of Obstetrical Units 

including bedside teaching _ „ _ — 15 hours 

This course deals with housekeeping and managerial problems. It in- 
cludes discussions related to ordering of supplies, care of equipment, 
organization of the department, estimations of needed personnel, ar- 
rangement of schedules and hours of work and assignment of duties. 
Conferences ~ Miss Hickcox and staff 

Nursing 135. Practice in Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing 4 months 

This consists of supervised practice in the nursing procedures involved 
in the care of mothers and infants in the pavilions, nurseries, labor 
and delivery rooms and the out-patient department. In connection 
with the practice the student will write case studies, prepare papers 
on special subjects and participate in conferences. 

Miss Hickcox and staff 

Nursing 136. Practice in Ward Management and Ward Teaching...4 months 

Supervised practice in assisting the head nurse in the administration of 

the pavilion and the conduct of the pavilion teaching program, with 

emphasis on the particular field in which the student expects to function. 

Miss Hickcox and staff 

Health Nursing 

Health Nursing 150. Social and Economic Aspects of Health and 

Disease 1 5 hours 

A course of study dealing with the prevention of sickness and the promo- 
tion of health with emphasis upon the social and economic factors in 
the home and in the community. 
Lectures and conferences Miss Frost 

Psychiatric Nursing 

Nursing 160. Psychiatry 45 hours 

This course deals with psychopathic conditions, their prevalence, social 

aspects, etiology, pathology, treatment and prevention. 
Lectures and clinics Dr. Diethelm and staff 

Nursing 161. Principles of Psychiatric Nursing 30 hours 

This course deals with the basic principles in the nursing care of 
psychiatric patients and the nursing procedures used in their treat- 
ments. Emphasis is placed upon the relation between mental and 
physical illness and the effects of child behavior on future adult life. 
Lectures, clinics, demonstrations and conferences. ..Miss Sprogell and staff 

Nursing 163. Principles of Special Therapeutics - 15 hours 

This course gives the student an understanding of the use cf occupa- 
tional therapy and physiotherapy in the care of mentally ill patients. 

[9} 



Lectures and conferences, 

Miss Gunderson, Miss Brindle, Mr. Lawson, and Mrs. Gaute 

Nursing 165. Practice in Psychiatric Nursing 8 months 

This course consists of supervised practice in the care of the psychiatric 
patient, which includes experience in the special departments as 
out-patient department, adults and children, occupational, recreational 
and hydrotherapy departments. It also includes a period of super- 
vised observation and practice in the Payne Whitney Nursery School. 

Miss Sprogell and staff 

Nursing 167. The Management of Psychiatric Units 15 hours 

This course deals with housekeeping and managerial problems. It in- 
cludes discussions related to ordering of supplies, care of equipment, 
organization of the department, estimations of needed personnel, ar- 
rangement of schedules and hours of work and assignment of duties. 
Conferences Miss Sprogell and staff 

Surgical Nursing 

Nursing 180. Surgery _ 40 hours 

This course includes a brief survey of a number of the special fields in 
surgery and the more recent developments in the surgical treatment 
of diseases. Emphasis is placed upon signs, symptoms and observa- 
tions which should be made both preceding and following operations 
as well as upon essential points related to the physical care of the 
patient. 
Lectures and clinics - - - _....Dr. Heuer and staff 

Nursing 181. Principles of Surgical Nursing _ 35 hours 

This course treats of the principles underlying the nursing care of 
surgical patients and affords an opportunity for observation and dis- 
cussion of new ways of applying these principles. It also includes 
the nutritional aspects of the care of surgical patients. 
Lectures, clinics, demonstrations and conferences, 

Miss Parker and staff ; Miss Rynbergen 

Nursing 182. Practice in Surgical Nursing _ _ ~...4 months 

Supervised practice is provided in the following services: general sur- 
gery, urology, out-patient, general operating room. 

Miss Parker, Miss Banfield and staffs 

Operating Room Technique and Management 

Nursing 183. Practice Teaching of Operative Technique 15 hours 

This course provides students with the opportunity to conduct classes 
following the preparation of an outline and lesson plans in connection 
with the course in ward teaching. 

Miss Kennedy, Miss Lyons and staff 

[10] 



Nursing 184. Operating Room Management and Supervision- 15 hours 

This course deals with the care and ordering of supplies and the care 
of rooms. It includes discussions related to organization of the 
department, estimations of needed personnel, arranging of schedules, 
of cases and hours of work, assignment of duties and participation 
in the plans for student teaching and the general supervision of the 
operating suite. 
Conferences Miss Parker, Miss Lyons and staff 

Nursing 185. Practice in Operating Room 

Technique and Management _ 6 months 

The practice in operating room management includes observation, cir- 
culation, assisting at the operating table, night service, and responsi- 
bility for one operating room. The student will also have experi- 
ence in assisting with the supervision of student practice and the 
general administration of all of the general operating rooms. 

Miss Parker, Miss Lyons and staff 

Nursing Education 

Nursing 190. Ward Management - 30 hours 

The practical aspects of ward administration are discussed. The first 
half of the course is devoted to the physical unit, its equipment, care 
and replenishment. The second half is concerned with the organiza- 
tion of personnel, relationships between co-workers and members of 
other departments, and social contacts with patients and visitors. 
Students make application of class room problems to the specific fields 
in which they are interested. 
Lectures and conferences _ Miss Kennedy 

Nursing 191. Ward Teaching „ 30 hours 

This course deals with the principles of learning and teaching and 
emphasizes learning activities and teaching methods. The conference 
method is analysed and studied as the chief method in ward teaching. 
Students prepare lesson plans and demonstrate this method of in- 
struction. 
Lectures and conferences Miss Kennedy 

Nursing 192. Supervision in Schools of Nursing 30 hours 

This course considers supervision from the administrative and educa- 
tional aspects. The principles of inspection, teaching, guidance, and 
research as they relate to supervision in schools of nursing are dis- 
cussed. The student plans programs of supervision in her special field 
and selects one project fcr special study to cover a four months period. 
(Open to a limited number of well qualified students during the spring 
term, February through May.) 
Lectures and conferences _ _ — .Miss Kennedy 

Cii] 



Medical Nursing 

Nursing 120. Medical Diseases „ _ 45 hours 

This course includes an introduction to general medicine, a survey of 
medical diseases, the latest and most approved methods of treating 
these conditions and the nurse's place in assisting in the recognition 
of symptoms and in supplying the physical and mental care incident 
to the disease. 
Lectures and clinics Dr. DuBois and staff 

Nursing 121. Principles of Medical Nursing 30 hours 

The principles underlying the nursing care of medical patients are 
presented and discussed with emphasis on their application in the 
newer methods of caring for these patients. This includes the tech- 
nique for medical asepsis and the nutritional aspects of the care of 
medical patients. 
Lectures, demonstrations and clinics, 

Miss Parker and staff ; Miss Rynbergen 

Nursing 122. Practice in Medical Nursing 4 months 

This includes practice in general medicine, communicable diseases and 
out-patient service. Communicable diseases may or may not include 
the exanthemata. 

Miss Parker, Miss Banfield and staffs 



[12] 



Administrative Officers of the School of Nursing 

Anna D. Wolf, MA., R.N. 

Director of the School of Nursing, 
Director of the Nursing Service, 

May Kennedy, M.A., R.N. 

Associate Director, School of Nursing, 
Director of Pedagogy. 

Harriet Frost, R.N. 

Associate Director, School of Nursing, 
Director, Public Health Nursing. 

Gertrude S. Banfield, B.A., R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing, 

Head of Out Patient Nursing Instruction and Services 

Verda F. Hickcox, B.S., R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing, 

Head of Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing Instruction and Services. 

Sarah E. Moore, R.N. 

Asisstant Director, School of Nursing, 
Administrative Assistant, Nursing Service. 

Bessie A. R. Parker, B.S., R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing, . 

Head of Medical and Surgical Nursing Instruction and Services. 

Agnes Schubert, M.A., R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing, 

Head of Pediatric Nursing Instruction and Service. 

Carolyne A. Sprogell, B.S., R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing, 
Director of Psychiatric Nursing, 
Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic. 



[13] 




AL129N 



authorNEW YORK HOSPITAL TRAILING 

SCHOOL FO R HUE :. __ 

Aimounceaerits, 1896-1939" 



TITLE 



Rr\oar\\Aitrtff, 



ALL29E 
im TORS UOSPZT^ TRAILING SCHOOL 
FOI- TORSES 

■Annotmcments, 1396-I939.